Author Topic: General Atomics railgun  (Read 3512 times)

adroth

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General Atomics railgun
« on: November 26, 2016, 04:17:28 AM »
https://youtu.be/NWZPp3aEjuM

https://youtu.be/Ev0G49jXJX0

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General atomics railgun has successful tests which will lead to army truck based railgun system

http://www.nextbigfuture.com/2016/05/general-atomics-railgun-has-successful.html

General Atomics Electromagnetic Systems (GA-EMS) officials demonstrated its Blitzer electromagnetic railgun system at the U.S. Army's Fires Center of Excellence annual Maneuver and Fires Integration Experiment (MFIX)last month at Ft. Sill in Lawton, Oklahoma.

There were eleven firings of the Blitzer railgun during the MFIX event, all at a target with a range that was greater than previous Blitzer firings. At the end of MFIX, GA-EMS' Blitzer railgun system will be transported back to Dugway Proving Ground in Utah for more testing later this year.

< Edited >

General Atomics Electromagnetic Systems (GA-EMS) tested their hypersonic projectiles with prototype components for their Guidance Electronics Unit (GEU) successfully performed programmed actions and communicated component performance to a ground station via a telemetry link in tests carried out in 2016. The GEU, housed in the aerodynamically stable test projectile consists of a number of components, including integrated navigation sensors and processors for guidance, navigation and control.

< Edited >
« Last Edit: November 26, 2016, 04:39:32 AM by adroth »

Ayoshi

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Re: General Atomics railgun
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2017, 03:47:33 AM »
USN recharges railgun science and technology effort | IHS Jane's 360 - 06 June 2017
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The US Navy (USN) did not request any funding in its fiscal year 2018 (FY 2018) budget to transition the electro-magnetic railgun (EMRG) onto a ship, but the service would continue to fund research and development (R&D) efforts with the goal of fielding a prototype for testing in FY 2019.

In its FY 2018 budget the USN requested USD93 million for research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E) of several Innovative Naval Prototypes (INPs) that include the EMRG. It is unclear how much would be allocated for railgun because the navy does not publish specific numbers just for EMRG research and development.

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Whatever funds are designated for EMRG would be used to continue progressing towards a 32 megajoule (MJ), 10 round per minute railgun capability with a long-life barrel, Tom Boucher, Office of Naval Research (ONR) programme manager for the EMRG, told Jane's.

The programme office is focused on several areas: achieving a repetition rate of 10 rounds per minute; finding materials that can be used to extend the EMRG's bore life; managing thermal properties within the gun; and designing a power system for the gun.


The ONR is continuing risk reduction work to improve the EMRG's bore life as well as demonstrate the ability to shoot 10 rounds per minute. Source: John Williams/USN

Ayoshi

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Re: General Atomics railgun
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2019, 02:54:02 AM »
Quote
US Navy’s Railgun Entering New Testing Phases | The Diplomat - June 29, 2019

U.S. Navy environmental impact documents and government testing officials indicate that the navy’s electromagnetic railgun prototype is progressing toward eventual at-sea testing.

Railguns use bursts of massive electromagnetic energy to push solid projectiles at high speeds over great ranges without using gunpowder or chemical propellants. The U.S. Navy prototype is designed to push projectiles at six or seven times the speed of sound up to 100 nautical miles, far in excess of current navy cannon, which can shoot out to about 13 nautical miles.

Earlier this year it was reported that the railgun’s development was a declining priority for the Pentagon and emphasis would instead be put on developing its associated high-velocity projectile for use by conventional cannon, which could fire it at twice or three times the range of conventional explosive projectiles currently in use.

The new testing developments suggest that the railgun’s development remains on track.

Until now the Navy’s railgun had been under development and testing at a U.S. Navy facility in Dahlgren, Virginia, but it lacks the range to test the weapon’s full potential. Last month a U.S. Navy railgun prototype completed installation and “shakedown” at the White Sands Missile Range, a 3,000 square mile testing site in the New Mexico desert that also hosted the first atomic bomb test during World War II.

https://thediplomat.com/2019/06/us-navys-railgun-entering-new-testing-phases/