Author Topic: Cyclone class PCs  (Read 2978 times)

Ayoshi

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Cyclone class PCs
« on: November 18, 2016, 01:45:11 AM »
navy.mil

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Patrol Coastal Ships - PC

Description
The primary mission of Patrol Coastal ships is coastal patrol and interdiction surveillance, an important aspect of littoral operations outlined in the Navy's maritime strategy. The Cyclone-class PCs are particularly suited for the maritime homeland security mission and have been employed jointly with the U.S. Coast Guard to help protect our nation's coastline, ports and waterways from terrorist attack; in addition, the ships have been forward deployed to the Gulf region in support of the war on terrorism.

Background

The Cyclone-class ships are assigned to Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Of the 13 ships, three operate out of Mayport, FL., and ten are forward deployed to Manama, Bahrain. These ships provide the U.S. Navy with a fast, reliable platform that can respond to emergent requirements in a shallow water environment. USS Cyclone was the lead ship of the Navy's Cyclone-class of patrol coastal boats. The ship was decommissioned and stricken from the Navy list on February 28, 2000, and was given to the U.S. Coast Guard the next day. There, the Cyclone was re-commissioned as USCGC Cyclone (WPC 1). Serving in this role for another four years, the ship was finally transferred to the Republic of the Philippines on March 8, 2004, where the Cyclone entered naval service as BRP Mariano Alvarez (PS 38). The Navy and Coast Guard signed an agreement in August 2004 that allowed five ships to be under the operational command of the Coast Guard beginning in October 2004. Two of five ships were returned to the Navy in 2008. The remaining three were returned in 2011. In 2009, the ships began a sustainment program to update their ships engineering, navigation, communication, combat and support systems.

U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility (March 17, 2014) The Cyclone-class coastal patrol ship USS Typhoon (PC 5) and other coastal patrol ships assigned to Patrol Coastal Squadron 1 (PCRON 1) transit in formation during a divisional tactics exercise. PCRON 1 is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Charles Oki/Released)


YouTube video: Quick Facts - Coastal Patrol Ships
« Last Edit: November 19, 2016, 08:51:15 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: Cyclone class PCs
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2016, 01:47:15 AM »
Griffin Missile Reaches Initial At Sea Operating Capability | usni.org - March 26, 2014
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The missile the U.S. Navy plans to use in early versions of the Littoral Combat Ship surface warfare mission package and on Cyclone class patrol craft has reached initial operating capability (IOC) for its first use at sea, missile maker Raytheon announced Tuesday.

The IOC of the MK-60 Patrol Costal Griffin Missile System follows a series of tests that began in March of 2012, including testing aboard Cyclone PCs.

YouTube videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HC9p7_JAXMA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSsXLc6T84M

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ok1Kh6_DWas
« Last Edit: November 18, 2016, 03:02:07 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: Cyclone class PCs
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2016, 01:48:10 AM »
US Navy ship fires warning shots after multiple ships 'harassed' by Iranian attack craft | business insider - Aug. 25, 2016
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Just one day after video emerged of Iranian ships swarming and harassing the USS Nitze, Business Insider has confirmed a separate incident on Wednesday involving the USS Squall, a coastal-patrol ship, in the northern Arabian Gulf.

<snipped>

The USS Tempest and USS Squall were "operating in international waters of the northern Arabian Gulf when three IRGCN [Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy] vessels approached at high speed." The vessels veered within 600 yards of the US Navy ships despite auditory and visual warnings from their crews.

Later on, Urban says a Naser-class fast-attack craft charged the Tempest and came within 200 yards. At this point the Tempest fired three flares at the Iranian vessel.

Crewmen of the USS Squall were forced to open fire at an Iranian navy boat that ignored repeated warning not to come close, the US Navy said. US Navy Photo / MCI Michelle Turner
« Last Edit: November 18, 2016, 01:51:29 AM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: Cyclone class PCs
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2017, 12:06:00 AM »
DARPA Testing TALONS Sensor Aboard U.S. Navy Patrol Vessel USS Zephyr | Navy Recognition - 16 August 2017
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DARPA’s Towed Airborne Lift of Naval Systems (TALONS) research effort recently demonstrated its prototype of a low-cost, elevated sensor mast aboard a commissioned U.S. Navy vessel for the first time. The crew of USS Zephyr, a 174-foot (53-meter) Cyclone-class patrol coastal ship, evaluated the technology demonstration system over three days near Naval Station Mayport, Florida.

TALONS demonstrated safe and routine operation from the ship’s deck under a variety of sea states and wind conditions without adversely affecting the ship’s operational capability. In tests, the system significantly improved the ship’s ability to detect, track, and classify contacts of interest. It also increased communications range between the ship and remote platforms such as the Zephyr’s rigid hull inflatable boats (RHIBs).

Towed behind boats or ships, TALONS could persistently suspend intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR) instruments and communications payloads of up to 150 pounds at altitudes between 500 and 1,500 feet above sea level—many times higher than current ships’ masts—greatly extending the equipment’s range and effectiveness.


DARPA’s Towed Airborne Lift of Naval Systems (TALONS) research effort recently demonstrated its prototype of a low-cost, elevated sensor mast aboard a commissioned U.S. Navy vessel for the first time. The crew of USS Zephyr, a Cyclone-class patrol coastal ship, evaluated the technology demonstration system over three days near Naval Station Mayport, Florida. Picture: DARPA


TALONS At-Sea Demo on USS Zephyr Patrol Coastal Ship

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Li9UKaz6p4w

Ayoshi

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Re: Cyclone class PCs
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2018, 01:30:54 AM »
US coastal patrol ships complete Griffin missile shoot | Janes - 21 September 2018
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The Mark 60 GMS comprises the Mk 4 battle management system, the Mk 208 Griffin launcher module, a laser targeting system (using the FLIR Systems’ BRITE Star II multi-sensor electro-optical turret), and the Raytheon BGM-176B Griffin B all-up-round. Using a combination of GPS-aided inertial guidance and a semi-active laser seeker for precision attack, the Griffin B missile is effective out to a range of 3 n miles (5.5 km). Both single and salvo launches can be performed.

Installation of the Mark 60 GMS on board the Cyclone-class ships was approved in June 2011 as a rapid deployment capability leveraging existing government off-the-shelf, commercial off-the-shelf and non-developmental items. Maritime testing for the system began in March 2012.


A Griffin missile is launched from the Cyclone-class patrol ship USS (PC 4) on 17 September as part of a fleet firing exercise in the Gulf. Source: US Navy

LionFlyer

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Re: Cyclone class PCs
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2020, 09:19:22 AM »
USS Shamal will be decommissioned on January 13, 2021. I believe rest of those based out of Mayport, Florida (Zephyr, Tornado) would also be decommissioned around the same time.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2020, 09:23:06 AM by LionFlyer »

LionFlyer

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Re: Cyclone class PCs
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2021, 11:39:48 PM »
https://news.usni.org/2021/02/18/navy-decommissions-3-cyclone-patrol-craft-looking-to-shelve-mark-vi-patrol-boat

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Navy Decommissions 3 Cyclone Patrol Craft; Looking to Shelve Mark VI Patrol Boat
By: Sam LaGrone
February 18, 2021 7:09 PM

The Navy began the latest round of decommissionings of its Cyclone-class patrol craft this week, with the service retiring three PCs in ceremonies at Naval Station Mayport, Fla.

USS Zephyr (PC-8), USS Shamal (PC-13) and USS Tornado (PC-14) were all ceremonially taken out of service before being officially placed into a new status in March. Zephyr and Shamal are set to be scrapped, while Tornado will be marked for potential foreign military sale.

The three PCs were used to train crews for the forward-deployed Cyclones that are based in U.S. 5th Fleet. Originally designed as transports for special operations forces, the 400-ton PCs were mostly used as counters against Iranian small fast attack craft in and around the Persian Gulf, as well-armed escorts for U.S. ships transiting the Strait of Hormuz.

In 2013, the Navy announced it was relocating 10 Cyclones to U.S. 5th Fleet to pick up missions from guided-missile destroyers that were flowing out of the region for other missions after the height of the naval buildup for the Iraq invasion.

As the remaining Cyclones are set to decommission over the next several years, U.S. 5th Fleet will fill in the gap with forward-deployed Littoral Combat Ships armed with a suite of surface warfare weapons designed to combat swarming boat threats and Coast Guard patrol boats, Navy surface warfare director Rear Adm. Paul Schlise said last month at the Surface Navy Symposium 2021, according to Naval News.

The Cyclone decommissionings come as the Navy is seeking to shed its 12 Mark VI patrol boats that were supposed to pick up from the PCs.

With limited operational time, the Navy wants to get rid of the Mark VI patrol boats as a cost saving measure, USNI News has learned.
According to a Feb. 5 General Administration message, “the Navy will inactivate the MK VI 78-foot Patrol Boat (MK VI) no later than (NLT) 30 September 2021 in accordance with approved budgetary decisions.”

The GENADMIN message was first reported by The War Zone.

A Navy spokesman told USNI News this week that the service would not address the disposition of the Mark VI boats as it was “pre-decisional” and contingent on the release of the Fiscal Year 2022 Navy budget.

Bristling with guns, the $15 million, 74-ton Mark VI arrived in 5th Fleet in 2016 but were not extensively used in the region. Sources familiar with the platform said the boats had suffered problems in their engineering plants and required extensive maintenance to keep them operational.

Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Tracy King, the director of expeditionary warfare on the chief of naval operations’ staff (OPNAV N95), said at SNA 2021 that the 12 MK VIs, “were very expensive to maintain