Author Topic: Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) - Independence variant  (Read 1556 times)


adroth

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Re: Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) - Independence variant
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2019, 02:55:07 PM »
https://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/photos/190227-N-WR119-0043.JPG

190227-N-FC670-475 PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 27, 2019) The Independence-variant littoral combat ships USS Independence (LCS 2), left, USS Manchester (LCS 14) and USS Tulsa (LCS 16) are underway in formation in the eastern Pacific. Littoral combat ships are high-speed, agile, shallow draft, mission-focused surface combatants designed for operations in the littoral environment, yet fully capable of open ocean operations. As part of the surface fleet, LCS has the ability to counter and outpace evolving threats independently or within a network of surface combatants. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Shannon Renfroe/Released)

« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 09:56:57 AM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) - Independence variant
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2019, 01:11:20 AM »
This is now a thread index.

adroth

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Re: Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) - Independence variant
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2019, 01:15:28 AM »
16 DECEMBER 2018
AUSTAL AWARDED LCS 36 AND 38

https://www.austal.com/news/austal-awarded-lcs-36-and-38

AUSTAL (ASX: ASB) is pleased to announce that the United States Department of Defence has awarded Austal USA a contract to build two additional Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) for the US Navy fleet. This brings the total of new LCS orders booked in calendar year 2018 to four ships.

For competition reasons the US Navy has not announced the actual contract value but has stated that award is under the congressional cost cap of US$584 million per ship.

“This latest order from the US Navy is a tremendous endorsement of Austal’s unique aluminium trimaran and further evidence of the important role Austal plays in building the United States Navy” Austal CEO, David Singleton said.

“We have been very successful, winning two Littoral Combat Ships per annum in competitions in each of the last three US Government financial years. This has been achieved as a result of a highly focused and successful program of production efficiency at our shipyard in Alabama and is a credit to that team”

“The award of LCS 36 and 38 will mean that Austal has a forward order book of a further ten ships to deliver in a continuous production program that now extends out to 2025. This strong order book creates continuity and certainty of workload for the Austal workforce in Alabama who have achieved so much. For our shareholders, the order book will drive continued growth in earnings over the next few years”

“Growth in the order book will also continue to drive ship support and sustainment revenues over the coming years adding further reliability to Austal’s earnings. This is an increasingly important part of the revenue base of the company and is likely to continue to grow significantly, well into the future, as ships are delivered and deployed around the world” he said.

With nine delivered, and a further ten vessels either under construction or awaiting construction (including the future USS Canberra) these two additional ships represent Austal’s eighteenth and nineteenth ships in the Independence Class.

The Littoral Combat Ship’s role continues to take shape as a key component of the Navy’s ability to gain sea control through distributed lethality. Austal continues to deliver these ships on-time and on-budget to support the needs of the fleet. The Independence-variant LCS, along with Austal’s highly successful EPF are designed, constructed and well positioned to meet the needs of the fleet today and into the future. The flexibility and capacity of the Austal USA shipyard to deliver the LCS and EPF are well suited to efficiently support the Navy’s desired fleet size of 355 ships with affordable solutions.

adroth

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Re: Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) - Independence variant
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2019, 01:53:43 AM »
Austal takes hit on LCS shock trials | IHS Jane's 360 - 5 July 2016
Quote
The initial results of the FSST has meant that design modifications and reworking of the overall design are in the process of being implemented for the nine remaining LCS vessels being constructed by Austal USA in order to meet shock standards and US Naval Vessel Rules.

According to the company, the "unique nature of the vessel has meant that there were minimal design reference points" to base the initial design on. USS Jackson is to be the only vessel that will be shock tested.

USS Jackson (LCS 6) undergoing shock testing. Source: US Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Bevan

adroth

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Re: Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) - Independence variant
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2020, 10:29:33 AM »
US Navy’s first 4 littoral combat ships to leave the fleet in 9 months
By: David B. Larter    
3 days ago

https://www.defensenews.com/naval/2020/07/01/the-us-navys-first-4-littoral-combat-ships-are-out-of-the-fleet-in-9-months/

WASHINGTON — The Navy’s first four littoral combat ships will be headed into mothballs next March, according to a June 20 message from the chief of naval operations.

The littoral combat ships Freedom, Independence, Fort Worth and Coronado will all be inactivated on March 31, 2021, with Coronado being commissioned just six years ago.

The Navy decided to cut the ships to save money on modernization efforts as it faces a mountain of shipbuilding bills and upgrade costs.

The ships were supposed to be used as test vessels for the continued standing up of the LCS class, but LCS 1 through 4 have just about reached the end of their usefulness as test vessels and are no longer worth a deeper financial investment, according to a February briefing by Rear Adm. Randy Crites, the deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for budget.

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