Author Topic: USAF light attack aircraft requirement  (Read 3399 times)

Ayoshi

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USAF light attack aircraft requirement
« on: February 28, 2017, 07:56:20 AM »
USAF seeks two new close-air support aircraft | flight global - 24 July, 2016
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In a recent briefing, air force officials laid out their plan for the light-attack OA-X and the A-X2, a short-term replacement for the A-10. The service is looking at an initial order of about 20 aircraft for the OA-X mission a early as next year, with serious procurement launching in Fiscal 2018, Dan Goure, an analyst at the Lexington Institute, tells FlightGlobal. To meet that rapid need, the service is examining two fully developed aircraft, Beechcraft’s AT-6 and Embraer’s A-29 Super Tucano, and are planning a “fly off” for this fall.

The air force has excluded Textron AirLand’s Scorpion, a dual light attack fighter and trainer aircraft still in its development phase, as an option for OA-X.

« Last Edit: February 13, 2020, 12:08:16 AM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: OA-X program
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2017, 07:59:39 AM »
US Air Force Chief Lends Support to Light Attack Aircraft Buy | defense news - January 18, 2017
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“The Air Force should embrace a 'high/low mix' of fighter aircraft. Very expensive fifth-generation technology is not needed in every scenario,” McCain wrote in the paper. If the Air Force purchased additional planes to supplement its current inventory, “these aircraft could conduct counterterrorism operations, perform close air support and other missions in permissive environments, and help to season pilots to mitigate the Air Force’s fighter pilot shortfall.”

Independent of Congress, the Air Force has been internally debating whether to purchase additional light attack aircraft since mid-2016. The proposed initiative, which goes by the moniker OA-X, is seen by its supporters as a way to accomplish the fight against militant organizations like the Islamic State group at a lower cost per flight hour, while freeing up other assets for training for battles in nonpermissive environments.


ACC chief: New light-attack aircraft must address future threats | IHS Jane's 360 - 27 February 2017
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The US Air Force (USAF) is to soon consider buying new light-attack aircraft, but General Herbert Carlisle, head of Air Combat Command (ACC), warned that such a platform must be capable of operating in future, potentially more dangerous, environments.

The USAF plans to request a new exercise, to be bankrolled in a fiscal year 2017 (FY 2017) supplemental budget, which will explore potential light-attack solutions, General David Goldfein, USAF chief of staff, said on 23 February.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 11:26:52 AM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: USAF OA-X program
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2017, 11:29:37 AM »
Senate panel approves $1.2B to start US Air Force OA-X aircraft procurement | Defense news - June 29, 2017
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WASHINGTON — If the U.S. Air Force determines it needs an OA-X light attack aircraft this summer, it will find strong support in the Senate Armed Services Committee, which has already authorized $1.2 billion to begin buying new planes.

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Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain, who chairs SASC, was an early supporter of OA-X. In a white paper published this January, McCain called for buying 300 low-cost, off-the-shelf light attack aircraft. Two hundred of those planes should be procured by fiscal 2022 to meet current operational demands, he said.

“The Air Force should embrace a 'high/low mix' of fighter aircraft. Very expensive fifth-generation technology is not needed in every scenario,” McCain wrote. “These aircraft could conduct counterterrorism operations, perform close air support and other missions in permissive environments, and help to season pilots to mitigate the Air Force’s fighter pilot shortfall.”

Although the Air Force has not confirmed the full list of participants in the light attack demo, several companies have disclosed their plans to take part. Sierra Nevada Corp. and Embraer have teamed up to offer the A-29, which the service is already purchasing for Afghanistan’s Air Force.

Textron will fly two planes, the turboprop AT-6 and the Scorpion jet. Like the A-29, the AT-6 has been positioned as a low-cost attack aircraft optimized for low-end missions. The more expensive Scorpion jet offers more sensor capability and could be a more attractive option if the Air Force decides it needs higher performance.

Industry officials see the recent actions by the House and Senate defense committees as a sign of support for a future OA-X program.

Ayoshi

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Re: USAF OA-X program
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2018, 08:35:57 AM »
USAF axes planned light attack combat demo | Janes - 04 February 2018
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Phase 1 for OA-X took place in August 2017, and involved the AT-6B Wolverine, A-29 Super Tucano, Textron Scorpion, and L3 Technologies-Air Tractor AT-802L Longsword. As the official noted, the first two platforms were designated as Tier 1 for meeting all of the USAF’s requirements, while the latter two were classed as being Tier 2 for meeting some of them. During this phase, USAF officials as well as those from Australia, Canada, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Uruguay assessed the aircraft through a series of representative close air support (CAS) tasks that involved machine gun strafing as well as freefall and guided-munition drops.

The secretary’s comments came about three months after a senior USAF official, speaking to Jane’s and other defence media under the Chatham House rule, said the planned combat demonstration was to take place as part of Phase 2 of OA-X.

Ayoshi

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Re: USAF OA-X program
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2018, 04:25:25 PM »
US Air Force releases timeline for light attack aircraft procurement | Janes - 07 August 2018
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The USAF anticipates a request for proposal (RFP) by December and a contract award by September 2019, according to a notice posted on the Federal Business Opportunities (FBO) website. The service suggested that Sierra Nevada Corp (SNC) and Textron Aviation were the only companies that appear to possess the capability of meeting the requirement within the USAF’s timeframe without causing a delay in meeting the needs of the warfighter.

SNC and Textron Aviation were the two companies that participated in the short-lived Light Attack Experiment (LAE), previously known as OA-X. LAE started in early May, but ended in early July after a fatal crash on 22 June. Navy Lieutenant Christopher Short died when the Embraer/SNC A-29 Super Tucano he was piloting crashed while over the Red Rio Bombing Range. Textron Aviation’s AT-6 Wolverine also participated in the flying portion of the LAE.

In addition to SNC and Textron Aviation, Aero Vodochody of the Czech Republic intends bid for the light attack procurement. The company said in mid-July at the Farnborough Airshow in the United Kingdom that it would offer its F/A-259 Striker aircraft. Aero Vodochody said it could not comment by the time of publication.


Aero Vodochody said it wants to offer its F/A-259 Striker for the USAF's light attack aircraft procurement. Source: Aero Vodochody via IHS Markit/Gareth Jennings

Ayoshi

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Re: USAF light attack aircraft requirement
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2020, 12:12:16 AM »
See also:
* EMB-314 Super Tucano (A-29) trainer / light attack aircraft
* PAF Close Air Support Aircraft Acquisition Project
* Textron Scorpion Light Attack / Recon Jet
* IOMAX Archangel
* Air Tractor AT-802L

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https://www.janes.com/article/94253/pentagon-budget-2021-us-light-attack-aircraft-requirement-moves-from-usaf-to-ussocom

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Pentagon budget 2021: US light attack aircraft requirement moves from USAF to USSOCOM
12 February 2020

According to the Department of Defense's (DoD) fiscal year (FY) 2021 budget documents released on 10 February, the USSOCOM is requesting deployable and sustainable "Armed Overwatch" aircraft to provide its special operations forces (SOF) with close air support (CAS); precision strike; and intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities. A recently issued request for information (RFI) noted that 75 fixed-wing aircraft are being sought for this requirement.

While the RFI did not name potential platforms, the likely candidates will include the Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC)-Embraer A-29 Super Tucano, Textron AT-6B Wolverine, Textron Scorpion, IOMAX Archangel, Air Tractor AT-802U, and L3 Technologies-Air Tractor AT-802L Longsword.

< snipped >

The USAF's efforts to field a light attack capability are long and protracted, dating back to a 2007 white paper that called for the establishment of a wing of aircraft dedicated to fighting 'irregular warfare'. This paper envisaged a force of helicopters, heavy propeller transports, and light turboprop strike aircraft to provide "assistance to partner nations across the full spectrum in development and employing indigenous air and space power to defeat irregular internal threats".


The A-29 Super Tucano is one of several platforms that would satisfy the new Armed Overwatch requirement of the USSOCOM. Source: US Air Force