Author Topic: A-10 Thunderbolt II (a.k.a “Warthog”)  (Read 4391 times)

Ayoshi

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A-10 Thunderbolt II (a.k.a “Warthog”)
« on: November 14, 2016, 01:21:24 AM »
From: military.com

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Affectionately called the “Warthog” for its aggressive look and often painted with teeth on the nose cone, the A-10 Thunderbolt II is the U.S. Air Force’s primary low-altitude close air support aircraft. The A-10 is perhaps best known for its fearsome GAU-8 Avenger 30mm gatling gun mounted on the nose. The GAU-8 is designed to fire armor-piercing depleted uranium and high explosive incendiary rounds.

The A-10 Thunderbolt II has excellent maneuverability at low air speeds and altitude, and is a highly accurate and survivable weapons-delivery platform. The aircraft can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time and operate in low ceiling and visibility conditions. The wide combat radius and short takeoff and landing capability permit operations in and out of locations near front lines. Using night vision goggles, A-10 pilots can conduct their missions during darkness.

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The A-10 has received many upgrades over the years. In 1978, the aircraft received the Pave Penny laser receiver pod, which sensed reflected laser radiation from a laser designator. Pave Penney has now been discontinued in favor more capable advanced targeting pods. The A-10 began receiving an inertial navigation system in 1980. Later, the Low-Altitude Safety and Targeting Enhancement (LASTE) upgrade provided computerized weapon-aiming equipment, an autopilot, and a ground-collision warning system.

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The Thunderbolt II can employ a wide variety of conventional munitions, including general purpose bombs, cluster bomb units, laser guided bombs, joint direct attack munitions or JDAM, wind corrected munitions dispenser or WCMD, AGM-65 Maverick and AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles, rockets, illumination flares, and the GAU-8/A 30mm cannon, capable of firing 3,900 rounds per minute to defeat a wide variety of targets including tanks.


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Photos taken from military.com
« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 12:18:53 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: A-10 Thunderbolt II (a.k.a “Warthog”)
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2016, 01:23:02 AM »
GAO warns of capability gaps after USAF A-10 retirement | IHS Jane's 360 - 26 August 2016
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Congressional auditors have raised concerns about potential for lost mission capability in a 24 August report about the US Air Force's (USAF's) plan to retire the Fairchild-Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II close-air support (CAS) aircraft.

The USAF "has not established clear requirements for the missions the A-10 performs and, in the absence of these requirements, has not fully identified the capacity or capability gaps that could result from the A-10 divestment," the US Government Accountability Office (GAO) said. "Without a clear understanding of the capability or capacity gaps and risks that could result from A-10 divestment, it is also unclear how effective or necessary the air force's and the department's mitigation strategies will be."

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U.S. Air Force Secretary: Service May Delay A-10 Retirement | aviationweek - Sep 16, 2016

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Although the U.S. Air Force has been fighting for years to sunset the A-10 attack plane so it can move resources to newer fighters, Secretary Deborah Lee James tells Aviation Week the air arm may once again delay plans to retire the Thunderbolt II.

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This photo of an A-10 sporting hundreds of bomb markings proves the Warthog has been pretty active fighting Daesh | The Aviationist - Nov 09 2016
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Since Nov. 17, 2014 when the U.S. Air Force moved a squadron-sized element of A-10C Thunderbolt aircraft from Bagram, Afghanistan, to Ahmed al Jaber airbase, in Kuwait, to join the fight against ISIS, the Hog (from various USAF units) has played an important role supporting Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR): it has carried out about one-third of the overall air strikes attacking the IS militants causing great losses and by deterring them from above using its GAU-8 Avenger a 30 mm hydraulically driven seven-barrel Gatling-type cannon and PGMs (Precision Guided Munitions).

Among the Thunderbolt units that have taken part to the air war against ISIS there is the 190th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, 124th Fighter Wing (Idaho ANG), from Gowen Field, Boise, Idaho.


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Image credit: 124th FW

Ayoshi

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Re: A-10 Thunderbolt II (a.k.a “Warthog”)
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2017, 08:41:16 PM »
30 A-10 Thunderbolt II Jets Take Part In Elephant Walk Exercise At Moody AFB | The Aviationist


Aircraft from the 23d Wing conducted a surge exercise May 22, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The exercise was conducted in order to demonstrate the wing’s ability to rapidly deploy combat ready forces across the globe. The 23d Wing maintains and operates A-10C Thunderbolt IIs, HH-60G Pave Hawks, and HC-130J Combat King II aircraft for precision attack, personnel recovery and combat support worldwide. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan)



Ayoshi

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Re: A-10 Thunderbolt II (a.k.a “Warthog”)
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2017, 12:05:26 PM »
Air Force could ground more than 100 A-10s as early as FY18 as life of wings runs out | Defense news
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Although the service plans to keep the majority of its A-10 fleet into the forseeable future, leaders have acknowledged that it will be forced to retire three Warthog squadrons unless it is given money for new wings. Currently, 109 out of 281 A-10s need their wings replaced to extend their lives to 16,000 flight hours.

But even if Congress funds the additional wingsets, the Air Force will not be able to hold a competition, award a contract and modify its A-10s with new wings before the service life of at least some of the the old wings runs out, said Gen. Ellen Pawlikowski, commander of Air Force Materiel Command.

As a stopgap measure, AFMC is considering harvesting wings from A-10s mothballed in the boneyards of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Arizona, refurbishing them and fitting them on Warthogs as their wings age out. But that “gives us a few more hours, not as many as new wings do,” Pawlikowski said, acknowledging that the situation was far from optimal.


Airman Akila Shrefler, A-10 Thunderbolt II crew chief with the 23rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, prepares an A-10 Sept. 13, 2017, for departure from Columbus AFB, Mississippi. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Gross)

Ayoshi

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Re: A-10 Thunderbolt II (a.k.a “Warthog”)
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2018, 10:10:51 AM »
USAF issues RFP to re-wing 112 A-10 aircraft | Janes - 29 May 2018
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The US Air Force (USAF) has issued a request for proposals (RFP) to re-wing about 100 of its Fairchild-Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II close air support (CAS) aircraft.

Released on 25 May, the RFP for the A-10 Thunderbolt Advanced Wing Continuation Kitting (ATTACK) programme calls for the re-winging of 112 aircraft over five annual ordering periods, with the option for two more years after that.

This ATTACK effort adds to the 173 aircraft that were upgraded under the previous Wing Replacement Program (WRP) that ran from 2007 through to 2018, with Boeing as prime contractor. Despite the USAF’s announcement midway through the WRP that it was to prematurely retire the A-10, it was deemed cheaper to continue with contracts awarded under the A-10 Thunderbolt Lifecycle Program Support (TLPS) than to cancel them.


With 173 A-10s having already received new wings under the WRP effort, the addition of 112 upgraded aircraft under the latest ATTACK programme will give the USAF the 285 platforms it intends to fly out into the 2030s. Source: US Air Force

Ayoshi

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Re: A-10 Thunderbolt II (a.k.a “Warthog”)
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2019, 03:53:35 AM »
https://www.shephardmedia.com/news/mil-log/usaf-10-completes-wing-replacement-programme/

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USAF A-10 completes wing replacement programme
15th August 2019 - 10:30 GMT

The US Air Force’s A-10 Thunderbolt II close air support aircraft has completed an eight-year wing replacement programme, with the last of 173 new wing sets having been installed at Ogden Air Logistics Complex at Hill AFB in Utah.

The ALC’s 571st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron (AXMS) swapped wings on 162 A-10s as part of the A-10Enhanced Wing Assembly replacement programme, while the remaining 11 were installed at Osan Air Base in South Korea.

In 2007, Boeing was awarded a $1.1 billion contract to build replacement wings for the aircraft at its Macon, Georgia plant that will facilitate the aircraft flying into the late 2030s.

The new wings are expected to last for up to 10,000 equivalent flight hours without a depot inspection, while a better wire harness design was introduced for easier wing removal and to lessen the chance of damaging the wing during this process.

Heavy stresses have been put on the wings throughout its lifetime, and given that the out of service date for the aircraft remains unknown, the wing replacement effort was an interim measure to ensure that the A-10 remains airworthy until this date.

Ayoshi

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Re: A-10 Thunderbolt II (a.k.a “Warthog”)
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2019, 02:46:54 AM »
https://www.shephardmedia.com/news/mil-log/boeing-contracted-more-10-wing-kit-work/

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Boeing contracted for more A-10 wing kit work
23rd August 2019 - 08:30 GMT

Worth a maximum of $999 million, the indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract award will result in Boeing being responsible for managing the production of up to 112 wing sets and spare kits, and an initial 27 wing sets were ordered at the point of contract award.

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Boeing will team with Korean Aerospace Industries and other suppliers to deliver the first wing sets to Hill Air Force Base in Ogden, Utah.

Under a previous contract, Boeing delivered 173 enhanced wing assemblies, deliveries of which it announced that it had completed in August 2019.


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Re: A-10 Thunderbolt II (a.k.a “Warthog”)
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2019, 02:40:18 AM »
https://www.janes.com/article/92127/usaf-awards-3d-audio-contract-for-a-10s

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USAF awards 3D-audio contract for A-10s
23 October 2019

Already operational on Royal Danish Air Force Lockheed Martin F-16 Fighting Falcon combat aircraft, the Terma 3D-audio system adds to what was previously just a simple visual warning on a cockpit control panel with a directional audible sound in the pilot's helmet, intuitively informing them where exactly the threat is coming from and enabling them to instinctively react to it.

According to Terma, applications for 3D-audio cueing include missile warning system threats; radar warner receiver threats; laser warner system threats; threats from small arms detection systems; indication of terrain obstruction warning and cueing; and applying direction to audio cues to aircraft subsystems to link display and auditory information.

There are about 350 A-10s in the inventories of the active USAF, Air Force Reserve, and Air National Guard, although a number have already been sent for mothballing at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Arizona. While the contract is for 328 3D-audio systems, the USAF has previously said it intends to upgrade between 150 and 200 of its A-10Cs with the capability.

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Re: A-10 Thunderbolt II (a.k.a “Warthog”)
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2020, 11:59:35 PM »
https://www.janes.com/article/94256/pentagon-budget-2021-us-air-force-again-pursuing-a-10-cuts

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Pentagon Budget 2021: US Air Force again pursuing A-10 cuts
12 February 2020

The US Air Force (USAF) is looking to reduce its Fairchild-Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II close air support (CAS) fleet again, this time by proposing to cut its non-active force fleet by 46 aircraft, or by 33%, in fiscal year (FY) 2021.

The USAF, according to its FY 2021 budget request released on 10 February, would keep its active force A-10 fleet at 143 aircraft but the service would slash its Air National Guard (ANG) fleet from 85 aircraft to 46 and also reduce its Air Force Reserve fleet from 55 aircraft to 48.