Author Topic: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)  (Read 5391 times)


adroth

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (by John Hopkins CSSE)
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2020, 02:03:50 PM »

adroth

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2020, 01:00:28 PM »

adroth

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2020, 01:04:13 PM »

adroth

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2020, 02:03:12 PM »
DOH confirms 3rd novel coronavirus case in the Philippines
Published February 5, 2020 1:51pm

https://www.gmanetwork.com/news/news/nation/724894/doh-confirms-3rd-novel-coronavirus-case-in-the-philippines/story/

The Department of Health on Wednesday confirmed the third case of novel coronavirus infection in the Philippines.

The patient was a 60-year-old who arrived in Cebu from Wuhan, China in January.

< Edited >

girder

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2020, 07:38:18 AM »
Study claiming new coronavirus can be transmitted by people without symptoms was flawed

Quote
A paper published on 30 January in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) about the first four people in Germany infected with a novel coronavirus made many headlines because it seemed to confirm what public health experts feared: that someone who has no symptoms from infection with the virus, named 2019-nCoV, can still transmit it to others. That might make controlling the virus much harder.

Chinese researchers had previously suggested asymptomatic people might transmit the virus but had not presented clear-cut evidence. “There’s no doubt after reading [the NEJM] paper that asymptomatic transmission is occurring,” Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told journalists. “This study lays the question to rest.”

But now, it turns out that information was wrong. The Robert Koch Institute (RKI), the German government’s public health agency, has written a letter to NEJM to set the record straight, even though it was not involved in the paper.

The letter in NEJM described a cluster of infections that began after a businesswoman from Shanghai visited a company near Munich on 20 and 21 January, where she had a meeting with the first of four people who later fell ill. Crucially, she wasn’t sick at the time: “During her stay, she had been well with no sign or symptoms of infection but had become ill on her flight back to China,” the authors wrote. “The fact that asymptomatic persons are potential sources of 2019-nCoV infection may warrant a reassessment of transmission dynamics of the current outbreak.”

But the researchers didn’t actually speak to the woman before they published the paper. The last author, Michael Hoelscher of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich Medical Center, says the paper relied on information from the four other patients: “They told us that the patient from China did not appear to have any symptoms.” Afterward, however, RKI and the Health and Food Safety Authority of the state of Bavaria did talk to the Shanghai patient on the phone, and it turned out she did have symptoms while in Germany. According to people familiar with the call, she felt tired, suffered from muscle pain, and took paracetamol, a fever-lowering medication. (An RKI spokesperson would only confirm to Science that the woman had symptoms.)
« Last Edit: February 08, 2020, 05:39:00 AM by girder »

adroth

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2020, 09:40:55 AM »

adroth

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2020, 01:34:01 PM »

girder

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2020, 02:44:18 PM »
A notable development has been the outbreak of the virus in Iran, with a deputy health official publicly known to have contracted the virus. Unfortunately the Iranian authorities have not learned the lessons of the Chinese in suppressing information leading to unrest and distrust among the populace.

This all raises the question if Filipino expatriates in Iran were previously included in the mandatory evacuation by the Philippine Navy prior to the outbreak. And if not, will they be required to take a repatriation flight like those evacuated from Wuhan and the Diamond Princess in Japan.

adroth

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adroth

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2020, 02:29:39 PM »

girder

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2020, 12:20:48 AM »
The Department of Health's local information page on COVID-19:
https://www.doh.gov.ph/2019-ncov
https://ncovtracker.doh.gov.ph/



Note, that the confirmed cases figure has not yet been updated with the most recently reported cases.

jetmech

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2020, 09:57:44 AM »
   To appease a perceived friend, instead being proactive from the start,  national leaders weakened the most effective defense of the Philippines against a pandemic, being an archipelago separated from mainland Asia. 

maverick2007

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2020, 01:49:11 PM »
   To appease a perceived friend, instead being proactive from the start,  national leaders weakened the most effective defense of the Philippines against a pandemic, being an archipelago separated from mainland Asia.

I don't think the Philippine Government missed something , the banned against the Chinese is timely a day diff from the US. Compared to other countries we are least affected .
https://www.interaksyon.com/politics-issues/2020/03/03/163342/who-philippines-new-coronavirus-doubts/

girder

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Re: 2019-nCov Global Cases (John Hopkins CSSE & World Health Organization)
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2020, 03:30:34 PM »
It should be noted that travel bans have mixed record  at best with regard to controlling the spread of disease. Especially with the extent of today's globalized world.

A travel ban would have to be completely enveloping to make any semblance of halting cross-border spread. But such policies for such would also likely then lead people to opt for indirect or  illicit means of travel, making it harder for authorities to keep track of cross-border flows. Not to mention the obvious social and economic disruptions caused by having to prevent both citizens and foreigners from crossing borders (both are equally capable of transmitting disease).

And in many cases this only buys some time as other trajectories for transmission (travel from non-travel banned countries) catch up. Other times (such as the African Ebola epidemic) it actually hindered efforts to control the disease for lack of logistical connections for needed personnel and materials.

Quote from: WHO
Recommendations for international traffic

WHO continues to advise against the application of travel or trade restrictions to countries experiencing COVID-19 outbreaks.

In general, evidence shows that restricting the movement of people and goods during public health emergencies is ineffective in most situations and may divert resources from other interventions. Furthermore, restrictions may interrupt needed aid and technical support, may disrupt businesses, and may have negative social and economic effects on the affected countries. However, in certain circumstances, measures that restrict the movement of people may prove temporarily useful, such as in settings with few international connections and limited response capacities.

Travel measures that significantly interfere with international traffic may only be justified at the beginning of an outbreak, as they may allow countries to gain time, even if only a few days, to rapidly implement effective preparedness measures. Such restrictions must be based on a careful risk assessment, be proportionate to the public health risk, be short in duration, and be reconsidered regularly as the situation evolves.

Travel bans to affected areas or denial of entry to passengers coming from affected areas are usually not effective in preventing the importation of cases but may have a significant economic and social impact. Since WHO declaration of a public health emergency of international concern in relation to COVID-19, and as of 27 February, 38 countries have reported to WHO additional health measures that significantly interfere with international traffic in relation to travel to and from China or other countries, ranging from denial of entry of passengers, visa restrictions or quarantine for returning travellers. Several countries that denied entry of travellers or who have suspended the flights to and from China or other affected countries, are now reporting cases of COVID-19.

Temperature screening alone, at exit or entry, is not an effective way to stop international spread, since infected individuals may be in incubation period, may not express apparent symptoms early on in the course of the disease, or may dissimulate fever through the use of antipyretics; in addition, such measures require substantial investments for what may bear little benefits. It is more effective to provide prevention recommendation messages to travellers and to collect health declarations at arrival, with travellers’ contact details, to allow for a proper risk assessment and a possible contact tracing of incoming travellers.

WHO. (2020 Feb 29). Updated WHO recommendations for international traffic in relation to COVID-19 outbreak.

Chinazzi, et. al. (2020.) The effect of travel restrictions on the spread of the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak. Medrxiv.org.

Tognotti. (2013 Feb.). Lessons from the History of Quarantine, from Plague to Influenza A. Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Thielking, M. (2020 Jan 31) Health experts warn China travel ban will hinder coronavirus response. STAT.

Baragona, S. (2020 Feb 3). Banning Travelers From China Won't Stop Virus, Experts Warn. VOA.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2020, 04:59:15 AM by girder »