Author Topic: Armidale class patrol boat  (Read 2755 times)

Ayoshi

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Armidale class patrol boat
« on: May 26, 2017, 04:50:03 PM »
Naval Technology
Quote
Armidale Class patrol boats were commissioned and built for the Royal Australian Navy to provide naval support for civilian authorities in missions such as fisheries protection, custom patrols and in protection against illegal immigration.

The Armidale class patrol boats were introduced to replace the 15 Freemantle Class large patrol vessels that entered service between 1980 and 1984 and approaching the end of their operational life.

In December 2003, the Australian Ministry of Defence awarded the prime contract to Defence Maritime Services (DMS) for the supply and support of 12 Armidale Class patrol boats. The Australian Government subsequently ordered two additional Armidale vessels in June 2006.

DMS subcontracted the design and construction of the patrol boats to Austal and they were built at Austal's Henderson shipyard near Freemantle. The $553m contract covers the design, build and supply of the patrol boats and support and maintenance for 15 years. DMS, formed in 1997 by P&O Maritime and Serco Australia, guarantees the availability of the patrol boats at 3,000 patrol days a year.

Armidale Class patrol boats

The construction of the first of class HMAS Armidale (83) began in May 2004. Armidale was launched in January 2005 and entered service in June 2005. The other ships of the class are:

HMAS Larrakia (84), commissioned February 2006
HMAS Bathurst (85), commissioned February 2006
HMAS Albany (86), commissioned July 2006
HMAS Pirie (87), commissioned July 2006
HMAS Maitland (88), commissioned September 2006
HMAS Ararat (89), commissioned November 2006
HMAS Broome (90), commissioned February 2007
HMAS Bundaberg (91), commissioned March 2007
HMAS Wollongong (92), commissioned June 2007
HMAS Childers (93), commissioned July 2007
HMAS Launceston (94), commissioned September 2007
HMAS Maryborough (95) commissioned December 2007
HMAS Glenelg (96), commissioned in February 2008


Photo taken from navy.gov.au
« Last Edit: November 24, 2019, 10:33:30 AM by adroth »

Ayoshi

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Re: Armidale class patrol boat
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2017, 04:52:28 PM »
Australian Navy visits Cebu for naval exercise
By: Norman V. Mendoza
@cebudailynews
10:00 PM October 14th, 2016

TWO patrol boats of the Royal Australian Navy arrived at the Naval Forces Central (Navforcen) port in Barangay Lo-oc, Lapu-Lapu City on Thursday as part of Exercise Lumbas 2016.

The two Armidale-class patrol boats, HMAS Glenelg (ACPB 96) and HMAS Larrakia (ACPB 84) will be in Cebu until October 21 for the naval exercise.

The patrol boats will be used as floating assets for different trainings, which the two navy groups will jointly undertake.

The annual exercise between the Philippine Navy and Royal Australian Navy that started in 1998 in the Philippines. It aims to strengthen relationship, inter-operability and enhance mutual cooperation between the two countries.

http://defenseph.net/drp/index.php?topic=409.msg801#msg801

Ayoshi

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Re: Armidale class patrol boat
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2017, 04:52:53 PM »
Australian Navy patrol boat catches fire at sea | Naval Today - May 26, 2017
Quote
The ship’s crew reported the fire in the engine room of HMAS Maryborough broke out as the ship was operating north east of Darwin.

According to the department of defense, the crew extinguished the fire in accordance with procedures and no crew members were injured in the incident.

< snipped >

HMAS Maryborough is an Armidale-class patrol boat in service with Royal Australian Navy. The ship entered service in December 2008.


Australian Navy file photo of HMAS Maryborough
« Last Edit: May 26, 2017, 04:55:28 PM by Ayoshi »

adroth

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Re: Armidale class patrol boat
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2019, 10:30:12 AM »
Given that Austal has offered the Cape class to the PN for its OPV requirements, it would be useful to understand how the Cape class differs from the older -- but outwardly very similar - Armidale class boats.

===

https://news.navy.gov.au/en/Dec2015/Fleet/2540/Cape-Class-ships-join-the-Fleet.htm#.Xdnrk-hKjD4

“The Cape Class boats are a more incremental change, with a number of subtle changes in the way things are configured and how the ship is setup – changes that have occurred as a result of lessons gained from several years use of the Armidale Class.
 
“Some of the differences are less subtle – the Cape Class boats have retained their blue colour scheme from Border Force, so outwardly the boats look different. Underneath, however, the work and the people are the same as on other Navy platforms,” Petty Officer Duncan said.
 
< Edited >
 
“The Cape Class brings improvements on the Armidale class in terms of design improvements, system technology and general crew comfort.
 
< Edited >

adroth

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Re: Armidale class patrol boat
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2019, 10:59:25 AM »
Navy's asylum seeker patrol boats docked in Darwin after large cracks found
Updated 4 Mar 2014, 5:25pm

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-03-04/navy-patrol-boats-docked-in-darwin-after-cracks-found/5297584

At least six patrol boats used by the Royal Australian Navy to intercept asylum seekers have been docked at the Darwin Naval Base amid concerns over structural cracks.

The large cracks were found near the engine room of one of the Armidale-class patrol boats about 10 days ago, according to a report in The Australian newspaper.

It is not the first time cracks have been found in the boats.

The Navy ordered a review of the Armidale class in August 2012 to assess whether the cracks were part of a fleet-wide design problem.

A spokesman for Immigration Minister Scott Morrison says the "maintenance issues" are being addressed.

< Edited >


=====


The navy's patrol boat fleet is over worked and under maintained according to a new report
AS much as the Government likes to say it's tough on asylum seekers and people smugglers, the stress on our patrol boat fleet is starting to show.

By IAN McPHEDRAN National Defence Writer
News Corp Australia Network
JANUARY 3, 20149:22PM

https://www.news.com.au/national/the-navys-patrol-boat-fleet-is-over-worked-and-under-maintained-according-to-a-new-report/news-story/220afafcf08f056b08cde70f52589524

EVERY time one of the navy's Armidale Class Patrol Boats departs from its Darwin base for a people smuggling patrol around Christmas Island the vessel and its crew face a 3000km journey simply to get to work.

That means 136 hours or 5.6 days of steaming time from HMAS Coonawarra before the small warship and her 25-strong crew even begin the arduous task of dealing with groups of desperate people who may have invested their life savings in a one-way ticket to Australia in a leaky Indonesian fishing boat.

< Edited >

The stresses on the sailors involved are well documented, but the strains on the 57-metre aluminium alloy boats built by Austal at its Henderson yard near Perth in WA are growing increasingly obvious as each week passes under Operation Resolute.

< Edited >

A secret report commissioned by Navy Chief Vice-Admiral Ray Griggs and seen by News Corp Australia, paints a gloomy picture of the impact that the high operational tempo and lack of maintenance are having on the boats.

The report by Army Major General Greg Melick focused on a near fatal gassing incident in August 2006 when four sailors were gassed by Hydrogen Sulphide, Chlorine and Carbon Monoxide generated by untreated sewage on board HMAS Maitland off Darwin.

A previous inquiry uncovered a litany of design flaws that were judged responsible for the incident that left one sailor, former Chief Petty Officer Kurt Mackenzie, near death and unable to ever work again.

< Edited >

The 14 Armidale Class vessels have been dogged by structural problems, contaminated fuel and toxic fume risks due to design deficiencies in the $30 million boats.

< Edited >

Following the 2006 gassing of four sailors in the reserve accommodation compartment (the Austere Compartment) at the stern of HMAS Maitland another sailor was gassed in the same area of another vessel in 2009. According to insiders the gassing risk still exists when the boats are cruising above 12 knots and under certain wind conditions hence the Austere compartment remains out of bounds.

The boats have also suffered from fuel contamination and structural cracking in the aluminium hull and their service lives have been cut short by the intense workload.

< Edited >

Two sober conclusions can be drawn from this sorry tale.

1. Had the vessel been designed, built and operated correctly Kurt Mackenzie would still be a functioning member of the Royal Australian Navy.

2. Had the Armidale Class Patrol Boats been correctly maintained and operated within their limits they would not have needed replacing years ahead of schedule.

< Edited >
« Last Edit: November 24, 2019, 01:55:03 PM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: Armidale class patrol boat
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2019, 01:48:45 PM »
Navy patrol boat repairs blow out by $45m
CAMERON STEWART
WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT
@camstewarttheoz

12:00AM JANUARY 6, 2016

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/defence/navy-patrol-boat-repairs-blow-out-by-45m/news-story/4d46bf79263096118475982d1f873b8d

The repair bill for the navy’s troubled patrol boats could blow out by up to $45 million as the damage to the overworked fleet becomes apparent from the ­asylum-seeker crisis of the Rudd-Gillard era.

The Australian understands that the start of a major refit for the 13 Armidale-class patrol boats has uncovered more damage than was expected, doubling the cost of repairing the first two boats and raising doubts over their durability.

The navy’s patrol boat fleet has suffered from a perfect storm of design faults, poor maintenance and the mission to intercept more than 50,000 asylum-seekers between 2008 and 2013, often in rough seas for which the boats were not designed. This has left the fleet in poor condition, with the government this year fast-tracking a replacement fleet of offshore patrol vessels, to be known as Corvettes, with construction to begin in 2018.

To keep the Armidale fleet afloat until the OPVs are ready in the early 2020s, the patrol boats are undergoing a progressive mid-life refit in Singapore rather than in Cairns or Darwin, where the navy has been disappointed in the quality and speed of repairs.

< Edited >

To supplement the remaining Armidales while two boats are progressively in refit, the Australian Border Force has temporarily transferred two Cape-class offshore patrol vessels to the navy to enable it to meet its border security obligations.

< Edited >

The Armidale-class fleet was built in Western Australia between 2004 and 2007 under order to civilian rather than military specifications, meaning they were ill-suited to operate regularly in high seas. This meant the aluminium alloy-hulled vessels were poorly equipped for the mission of intercepting and sometimes ­rescuing hundreds of asylum-seeker boats in rough weather as they made passage from Indonesia or Sri Lanka to Christmas Island between 2008 and 2013.

In March last year, a re-emergence of structural cracks in the boats caused almost half the fleet to be confined to port. This caused the navy to lose patience with the fleet and it asked the government to fast-track the construction of steel-hulled, rather than aluminium alloy-hulled boats, to make them more resistant to rough seas and poor weather. Although there have been turn-backs of asylum-seeker boats since 2013, the lull in boats seeking to make the crossing has allowed the navy to develop deep maintenance and refit programs to keep the Armidale-class fleet afloat.

< Edited >