Author Topic: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer  (Read 17460 times)

adroth

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2018, 05:29:11 PM »
US Navy Accepts Delivery of New Stealth Destroyer

The second Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer was delivered to the U.S. Navy last month.
By Franz-Stefan Gady
May 04, 2018
 
https://thediplomat.com/2018/05/us-navy-accepts-delivery-of-new-stealth-destroyer/

The U.S. Navy has accepted delivery of the future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), the second ship of the Zumwalt-class – the U.S. Navy’s largest and technologically most advanced class of guided-missile destroyers — from shipbuilder General Dynamics Bath Iron Works (BIW) on April 24.

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The delivery follows the successful completion of acceptance trials conducted by the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey — the service’s principal entity inspecting and reporting on a ship’s readiness for active duty operations — in February 2018. As with the first-of-class USS Zumwalt, slated to achieve initial operational capability in 2020, the Monsoor was delivered to the Navy last month with HM&E systems installed. The installation and activation of the guided-missile destroyer’s combat systems will take place in San Diego, California throughout 2018 and 2019 and is expected to be concluded by 2020. The Monsoor will be commissioned at its homeport in San Diego in January 2019.

Zumwalt-class destroyers feature distinct wave-piercing tumblehome hulls and a stealth design meant to reduce the ship’s radar cross-section. The destroyers are equipped with eighty MK57 vertical launch tubes, each capable of accommodating one to four missiles including SM-1, SM-2 and SM-6 missiles or Tomahawk land-attack missiles. The warships will also be armed with new long-range anti-ship missiles such as the Maritime Strike Tomahawk following a change of the mission requirements of the Zumwalt-class from a land-attack platform to surface warfare in November 2017. (The SM-6 surface-to-air missile can also be deployed as an anti-ship missile.)

The Zumwalt-class still lacks a projectile for its two main guns to be able to execute land-strike missions–up until November 2017 its primary mission requirement–as I explained previously:

    With a cost of $800,000 to $1 million per Long Range Land Attack Projectile (LRLAP) round, the precision ammunition has become too expensive for the service. LRLAP is the only ammunition specifically designed to be fired by the USS Zumwalt’s two 155 millimeter/62-caliber Advanced Gun Systems (AGS), the main armament of the ship with an estimated range of up to 63 nautical miles (72 miles, 115 kilometers).

The U.S. Navy still has to select a replacement. The third ship of the class, the future USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG 1002), is currently under construction at BIW with delivery to the U.S. Navy scheduled for 2020.

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Ayoshi

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2018, 01:39:16 AM »
Shipbuilders replace stealthy US destroyer’s 15-ton turbine | Defense news
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BATH, Maine — Shipbuilder Bath Iron Works has replaced one of the massive turbines on the future USS Michael Monsoor, and the stealthy destroyer is scheduled to depart for San Diego in November.

The delicate operation involved lifting and maneuvering the 15-ton Rolls-Royce marine turbine out of the ship, and workers had to build a rail system to assist in the removal and installation of the replacement turbine in August, officials said.

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Shipbuilders noticed an unusual vibration during sea trials and discovered afterward that a foreign object had damaged some of the blades, Lesko said. Although the turbine still worked, the Navy decided to replace it rather than repair the unit.

The Zumwalt-class destroyers use two main turbines similar to ones used on Boeing 777 jetliners to produce electricity that powers the ship and its sophisticated systems. Combined with auxiliary turbines, the ship produces 78 megawatts of power, enough for a small- to medium-size city.


A crowd watches the christening ceremony for the Zumwalt-class guided missile destroyer Michael Monsoor on June 18, 2016 at Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine. (Joel Page/Portland Press Herald via AP)

Ayoshi

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #17 on: December 13, 2018, 04:30:14 AM »
Last Zumwalt-class ship launched as USN considers fate of destroyers’ guns | Janes - 11 December 2018
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The third and final planned Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer Lyndon B Johnson was launched on 9 December at General Dynamics' Bath Iron Works (BIW) shipyard.

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Part of the destroyers' combat system testing and certification includes intensive refitting for their new surface-attack role.

adroth

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #18 on: December 16, 2018, 10:34:04 AM »
https://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/zumwalt-inside-the-us-navys-new-first-its-kind-super-stealth-18065

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DDG 1000 Weapons

The ship is engineered to fire Tomahawk missiles as well as torpedoes, Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile and a range of standard missiles such as the SM2, SM3 and SM6.

The ship also fires Vertical Launch Anti-Submarine Rockets, or ASROCs. ASROCs are 16-feet long with a 14-inch diameter; a rocket delivers the torpedo at very high speeds to a specific point in the water at which point it turns on its sensors and searches for an enemy submarine.

The first weapons to fire from the Mk 57 vertical launch tubes will be the ship defensive weapons called the Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile and the Standard Missile 2, or SM-2.

The ship is also built with Mk 57 a vertical launch tubes which are engineered into the hull near the perimeter of the ship.

Called Peripheral Vertical Launch System, the tubes are integrated with the hull around the ship’s periphery in order to ensure that weapons can keep firing in the event of damage.  Instead of having all of the launch tubes in succession or near one another, the DDG 1000 has spread them out in order to mitigate risk in the event attack, developers said.

In total, there are 80 launch tubes built into the hull of the DDG 1000; the Peripheral Vertical Launch System involves a collaborative effort between Raytheon and BAE Systems.

Also, the launchers are especially designed with software such that it can accommodate a wide range of weapons; the launchers can house one SM-2, SM-3 or SM-6, ASROCs and up to four ESSMs due to the missile’s smaller diameter, Knudson added.

 “It has a common launcher to you can change the adapter or computer function which connects the ship to the missile,” he said.

The ship also has a 155mm long range, precision-capable gun called the Advanced Gun System made by BAE Systems. The weapon can, among other things, fire a munition called the Long-Range Land Attack Projectile which can strike target at ranges out to 64 nautical miles.

Most deck mounted 5-inch guns currently on Navy ships are limited to firing roughly 8-to-10 miles at targets within the horizon or what’s called line of sight. The Advanced Gun System, however, fires GPS-guided precision 155m rounds beyond-the-horizon at targets more than three times that distance.

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http://www.bluebird-electric.net/aircraft_carriers/Zumwalt_Stealth_Destroyer_Raytheon_21st_Century_Northrop_Grumman_General_Dynamics.htm

« Last Edit: December 16, 2018, 10:44:49 AM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #19 on: December 16, 2018, 10:54:46 AM »
161208-N-SI773-0401

PACIFIC OCEAN (Dec. 8, 2016) The guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), the Navy's most technologically advanced surface ship, is underway in formation with the littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2) on the final leg of its three-month journey to its new homeport in San Diego. Upon arrival, Zumwalt will begin installation of its combat systems, testing and evaluation, and operation integration with the fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Ace Rheaume/Released)

Flickr


adroth

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2018, 11:13:13 AM »
Taken on March 11, 2014 by Paul VanDerWerf. Posted on Flickr



adroth

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #21 on: December 16, 2018, 11:32:21 AM »
Taken on September 4, 2018 by Noah Snowdon. Posted on Flickr


adroth

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #22 on: December 16, 2018, 12:02:21 PM »
181117-N-TP834-0267 (Nov. 17, 2018) ATLANTIC OCEAN – Capt. Scott Smith, commanding officer of Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001), fires an M240B machine gun. The future USS Michael Monsoor is the second ship in the Zumwalt-class of guided-missile destroyers. Michael Monsoor is currently transiting to San Diego, and upon arrival, will begin a combat availability and then undergo a combat test period. The ship is scheduled to be commissioned into the Navy Jan. 26, 2019, in Coronado, Calif. (Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John Philip Wagner, Jr./Released)

Posted on Flickr

« Last Edit: December 16, 2018, 12:08:39 PM by adroth »

Ayoshi

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2019, 12:44:59 AM »
From: shephardmedia.com - 16th January 2019

Raytheon receives DDG 1000 contract modification
Quote
Raytheon has received a $72.1 million contract modification to provide integrated logistics support and engineering services for US Navy Zumwalt-class destroyer DDG 1000, the company announced on 14 January.

Through this modification, the US Navy is exercising options under a previously awarded contract.


Surface Navy 2019: Commonality demand drove DDG 1000 planar rethink
Quote
The planar array technology intended to be installed on Zumwalt-class guided missile destroyers will instead likely be fitted to future US Navy surface combatants, with systems similar to those found on Arleigh Burke-class destroyers now finding a place on the DDG 1000 series’ unique superstructure.

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The programme has suffered from cost overruns and budget pressures, with an original 32 hulls reduced to just three; USS Zumwalt, USS Michael Monsoor and the future USS Lyndon B Johnson.

All three ships are likely to be focused towards the Pacific theatre of operations.

Displacing around 16,000t, the destroyers will be among the largest surface combatants in the world and coming in at over $4 billion per ship they represent a considerable investment by the US Navy.

Ayoshi

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #24 on: January 26, 2019, 02:03:57 AM »
US Navy to commission DDG 1001 | Shephard Media - 25th January 2019 - 16:30 GMT
Quote
The US Navy is set to commission its second Zumwalt-class destroyer, USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001), at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California, on 26 January.

The future USS Michael Monsoor’s vertical launche system (VLS) features larger cells, allowing this class to fire larger and more advanced land and anti-ship missiles in the future.

adroth

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #25 on: March 13, 2019, 02:02:57 PM »
https://www.navy.mil/viewGallery.asp?id=0&page=12327&r=4

190308-N-ZZ513-1029 SAN DIEGO (March 8, 2019) The Guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) departs San Diego as part of an operational underway, March 8, 2019. The milestone demonstrates the U.S. Navy's commitment to advancing the lethality of its surface combatants by integrating cutting-edge technologies in Zumwalt's combat systems, weapons, and engineering plants. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Natalie M. Byers/Released)


adroth

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #26 on: March 14, 2019, 10:08:53 AM »
USS Zumwalt Arrives in British Columbia for Port Visit
Story Number: NNS190313-01Release Date: 3/13/2019 10:03:00
From U.S. 3rd Fleet Public Affairs

https://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=108888

ESQUIMALT, British Columbia (NNS) -- The namesake of the U.S. Navy’s newest class of guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), arrived in Esquimalt, March 11.

“We are excited for this opportunity to visit Canada and further strengthen the close partnership between our navies and communities,” said Capt. Andrew Carlson, Zumwalt’s commanding officer. “By working together with partners like the Royal Canadian Navy, we help ensure the security, stability and prosperity of the Indo-Pacific region.”

The visit is an opportunity for the crew to experience the hospitality of the Canadian port, as well as showcase the U.S. Navy’s newest class of destroyers.

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https://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/photos/190311-N-DA737-0005.JPG

190311-N-DA737-0005 PACIFIC OCEAN (March 11, 2019) Sailors stand watch on the bridge aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000). Zumwalt is conducting routine operations in the Eastern Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan Jiang/Released)

« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 11:47:03 AM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #27 on: March 28, 2019, 11:36:36 PM »
Navy's $7.8 Billion Destroyer Due for Delivery 5 Years Late
By Anthony Capaccio
March 27, 2019, 1:00 AM PDT Updated on March 27, 2019, 12:35 PM PDT

Article

The first ship in the U.S. Navy’s $23 billion program to build a new class of destroyers is scheduled for a September delivery -- more than five years later than originally scheduled and 10 years after construction began on the stealthy vessels built by General Dynamics Corp.

Delivery plans for the Zumwalt-class guided missile destroyer have been a roller-coaster of changing milestones, most recently moved from May of this year to September, according to budget documents confirmed by a Navy spokeswoman. The ship isn’t expected to have an initial combat capability until September 2021, at least three years later than planned.

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The program was reduced to just three vessels and the Navy planned to buy 2,400 projectiles -- raising the estimated cost for each munition to as much as $566,000, according to the Naval Sea Systems Command.

The price tag contributed to the Navy’s decision in December 2017 to change the destroyer’s mission from shore bombardment to surface warfare against other vessels, aimed with longer-range missiles. The Navy is still searching for options.

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« Last Edit: June 13, 2019, 12:00:50 PM by adroth »

Ayoshi

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #28 on: April 30, 2019, 12:08:42 AM »
US Navy to christen Zumwalt-class destroyer Lyndon B. Johnson | Navy Recognition - 26 April 2019 15:34
Quote
The third ship in the Zumwalt-class, DDG 1002 is named in honour of late President Lyndon B. Johnson, who served in office from 1963-1969 and will be the first ship to bear his name.

Lynda Johnson Robb and Luci Johnson, the two daughters of the former president, will serve as the ship's sponsors. In a time-honoured Navy tradition, the sisters will christen the ship by breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow. Robb will also serve as the principal speaker.


An artist rendering of the Zumwalt-class guided-missile destroyer USS Lyndon B. Johnson, DDG 1002 (Picture Source: U.S. Navy photo illustration by Lt. Shawn Eklund)


Ayoshi

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Re: DDG 1000 Zumwalt class destroyer
« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2019, 10:33:30 PM »
USS Zumwalt land-attack destroyer to fire new missiles and laser weapons | Navy Recognition - 17 May 2019 15:17
Quote
The U.S. Navy’s stealthy new first-of-its-kind destroyer surface warship will incinerate targets with lasers, fire advanced weapons to destroy moving targets at sea and use upgraded interceptor missiles to track and knock-out approaching enemy fire - all as part of a broader strategic shift to prepare the high-tech ship for massive, “blue-water” maritime warfare on the open seas. Kris Osborn of Warrior Maven reports.

The USS Zumwalt, now going through combat and weapons activation, will receive new Maritime Tomahawk missiles able to track and destroy moving targets at sea, SM-6 IA interceptors, long-range precision guns and laser weapons, says Capt. Kevin Smith. the Zumwalt-class destroyer program manager. “We are no longer what is called a land attack that operates in the littorals. We are now an offensive surface strike platform for blue water. The Navy made a decision to go that way - for good reason,” Smith said. The Zumwalt, he said, is engineered with space, weight, and power configurations able to accommodate a new generation of weapons. It uses an electric drive with an integrated power system engineered to propel the ship as well as generate enormous volumes of onboard electrical power for computing, maintenance, and advanced weapons like high-energy lasers.