Author Topic: Oplan Merdeka / Jabidah Massacre  (Read 4965 times)

Ayoshi

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Oplan Merdeka / Jabidah Massacre
« on: March 23, 2018, 11:51:11 AM »
Jabidah and Merdeka: The inside story | Rappler
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The officers who participated in the Jabidah massacre have not fully come clean. In the end, it may have left a legacy of lying and cover-up in the military.

MANILA, Philippines – As it was a special government operation, details of Oplan Merdeka were known only to a few people. But the general concept was explained to the officers who were involved in it. The Philippines was to train a special commando unit – named Jabidah – that would create havoc in Sabah. The situation would force the Philippine government to either take full control of the island or the residents would by themselves decide to secede from Malaysia. Many Filipinos from Sulu, Tawi-Tawi, and parts of Mindanao had migrated to Sabah. Oplan Merdeka was banking on this large community to turn the tide in favor of secession.

About 17 men, mostly recruits from Sulu and Tawi-Tawi, entered Sabah as forest rangers, mailmen, police. The Filipino agents blended into Sabah's communities. Their main task was to use psychological warfare to indoctrinate and convince the large number of Filipinos residing in Sabah to secede from Malaysia and be part of the Philippines. Part of their job was to organize communities which would support secession and be their allies when the invasion took place. They also needed to reconnoiter the area and study possible landing points for airplanes and docking sites for boats.

https://www.rappler.com/newsbreak/24025-jabidah-massacre-merdeka-sabah

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Covering Jabidah Massacre commemoration circa 1988 | Mindanews - March 19, 2018
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Iligan City (MindaNews / 18 March) – Thirty years ago, when I was a newbie promdi journalist, I got invited to cover the commemoration of the Jabidah Massacre, that story of Moro fighters secretly trained, then massacred, on Corregidor Island in the Philippine government’s covert attempt to retake Sabah.

The Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) also considers March 18 as its founding day.


Tausug warriors of the MNLF’s National Security Command during the March 18, 1988 commemoration of the Jabidah Massacre somewhere in Calanogas, Lanao del Sur. MindaNews file photo by Bobby Timonera

http://www.mindanews.com/top-stories/2018/03/covering-jabidah-massacre-commemoration-circa-1988/
« Last Edit: March 23, 2018, 04:35:31 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: Oplan Merdeka / Jabidah Massacre
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2018, 11:55:41 AM »
Is ‘Jabidah Massacre’ a myth? | Inquirer.net - March 26, 2013
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In his speech last March 18 at the 45th anniversary of the so-called “Jabidah Massacre,” President Aquino stood at loggerheads with his father, the late former senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr., in their presentations of the event that triggered the Moro secessionist wars in the Philippines.

“It has been four and a half decades since the bloody events here in Corregidor,” the President said. “Members of the Jabidah unit were slain, and on top of that the ordeal has almost been forgotten. To this day the government has yet to officially recognize it.”

Apparently without fully realizing the import of his statement, the President stood on its head his father’s version of the tragedy. In his privilege speech at the Senate on March 28, 1968, Ninoy Aquino derided the Jabidah operation as having “all the trappings of a James Bond fiction.” Jabidah, said Ninoy, “is an operation so wrapped in fantasy and fancy … it is not at all funny.”  It is extremely important to draw on this privilege speech to determine whether the “Jabidah massacre” was a myth or an invention of an overactive  imagination. Ninoy said the story came to his attention six weeks before he exposed it in his privilege speech. Some Muslim leaders informed him of  “clandestine recruitment going on in the Sulu archipelago.” His  sources posed a number of questions to him: Why are our boys being recruited? Why are they leaving their homes? What is their mission in President Ferdinand Marcos’ service? Is the President organizing his own private army  to strike and seize the country if he senses, as he might be sensing, he will lose the 1969 polls?

Four weeks before the exposé, according to Ninoy, “a former head of the country’s intelligence service informed me of a plot hatched by President Marcos himself,” which struck him “as a gamble that would violate Constitution.” He refused to give it credence, as “it sounded so bizarre, so fantastic, so imaginative,” that he was moved to start an inquiry that led him to Sulu. His inspection in Sulu unveiled the existence of a secret training camp of the Jabidah project on Simunul island. Recruitment of Muslim youths began in September and ended in mid-December 1967. On Dec. 30, 135 recruits boarded a Navy ship that was to take them to Corregidor island. They arrived there on Jan. 3, 1968, for training as commandos to be integrated into the army’s regular forces.

According to Ninoy, Jabidah was the “code name of a supposedly super-secret operation of President Marcos to wipe out the opposition—literally, if need be—in 1969 and to set on a high foreign adventure. It is the code name … for Mr. Marcos’ special operation to ensure his continuity in power and achieve territorial gains.”

http://opinion.inquirer.net/49557/is-jabidah-massacre-a-myth

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‘Jabidah’ was a big hoax | Manila Times - March 22, 2015
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The so-called “Jabidah massacre” has been the biggest hoax foisted on this nation.

It was a yarn spun  in 1968 by treasonous politicians of the Liberal Party at that time as a propaganda weapon intended to deal what they thought would be a fatal blow to  then President Marcos’ bid for reelection the next year.

In another demonstration of the law of unintended consequences, the just organized Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) then used the allegation to rouse Muslim youth’s anger so they would rally to the fledgling organization, which the more powerful Muslim traditional politicians refused to support.

http://www.manilatimes.net/jabidah-was-a-big-hoax/171247/

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Editorial: Resurrecting the Jabidah Massacre | Sunstar - March 19, 2018
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Given our blood-saturated past, a person might wince at “another” unresolved massacre, distinguishable perhaps only by variations in the accompanying proper noun: Balangiga Massacre (1901), Patikul Massacre (1977), Escalante Massacre (1985), Mendiola Massacre (1987), Ampatuan Massacre (2009), Mamasapano Massacre (2015), the ongoing War on Drugs Massacre…

The ribbons one at first took as decor have become a rebuke about forgetting and a reminder of the dangers of apathy. What was the Jabidah Massacre? “Considered by many as the founding moment of Muslim separatism in Mindanao, the Jabidah massacre, which took place on Corregidor Island, involved the killing of Muslim trainees who were being prepared by the Philippine military in 1967 and 1968 to infiltrate and sabotage neighboring Sabah,” wrote Syed Muhd Khairudin Aljunied and Rommel A. Curaming in their paper, “Mediating and consuming memories of violence,” published in the March 3, 2012 issue of Taylor and Francis Online.

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/cebu/opinion/2018/03/19/editorial-resurrecting-jabidah-massacre-594306
« Last Edit: March 23, 2018, 12:16:19 PM by Ayoshi »

masq

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Jabidah massacre commemorated in 80-km caravan
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2021, 12:23:36 AM »
Jabidah massacre commemorated in 80-km caravan for extension of Bangsamoro transition
https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1408609/jabidah-massacre-commemorated-in-80-km-caravan-for-extension-of-bangsamoro-transition

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Peace advocates held a caravan on Thursday (March 18) to commemorate the 53rd anniversary of the Jabidah massacre on Corregidor island which triggered a Moro rebellion that erupted into a secessionist war that started in 1972.

The Jabidah massacre referred to the mass killing on March 18, 1968 of Moro recruits in training in Corregidor to infiltrate Sabah under a secret plan given the code name Jabidah. The Moro trainees were killed by Philippine government soldiers after they mutinied upon learning of the real purpose of their training. Accounts varied on the number of dead in the massacre from as few as 11 to as many as 68.

The day was also observed as Bangsamoro Freedom Day, a special nonworking holiday in the autonomous region.