Author Topic: Military cellphones / smartphones  (Read 1004 times)

Ayoshi

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Military cellphones / smartphones
« on: December 24, 2016, 01:37:36 AM »
U.S. Marines will receive smart phones to call fire support | Army Recognition - 19 December 2016
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The U.S. Marines will receive smart phones that make calling for fire support easier, quicker and more accurate. The Target Handoff System Version 2 is a portable system designed for use by dismounted Marines to locate targets, pinpoint global positioning coordinates and call for close air, artillery and naval fire support using secure digital communications.

The system is an upgrade to the Corps’ current Target Handoff System and is made up of a laser range finder, video down link receiver and a combat net radio.

The THS V.2 also will allowed U.S. Marines to coordinate fire support missions more precisely, minimizing collateral damage.

The THS V.2 uses commercial off-the-shelf smartphones that reduce the system’s total weight from roughly 20 to 10 pounds, making it easier to transport. It also features new, more intuitive software. Information is transmitted via an encrypted combat net radio, ensuring mission security.

« Last Edit: January 28, 2017, 04:26:00 AM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: Military cellphones / smartphones
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2017, 04:28:57 AM »
Bittium to deliver Tough Mobile smartphones and related back-end system for the Finnish Forces | Army Recognition - 27 January 2017
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Bittium has signed a contract with the Finnish Defence Forces for the delivery of Bittium Tough Mobile LTE smartphones and related Bittium Secure Suite back-end system classified for Confidential level. The contract signifies a strategic decision to reinforce the information security of the wireless communications of the Finnish Defence Forces. Bittium Tough Mobile smartphones and the related back-end system will be used in different and diverse functions within the Finnish Defence Forces.

In order for a phone and a related back-end system to achieve the Confidential level classification, there are specific information security requirements regarding the processing of classified information, secure wireless transfer of files, and other possible communication, which need to be met. Bittium Tough Mobile LTE smartphone and its back-end system designed for this classification level include features that have been hardened based on the Katakri 2015 requirements, such as, hardened operating system, hardened user identification, and data transfer. In addition, the solution includes Digia Salpa, a mobile communications encryption product that provides strong encryption of both calls and messages. Katakri 2015 is a tool used by the Finnish authorities for security and information security audits. Bittium Tough Mobile and its back-end system together with Digia Salpa are currently being tested by the National Cyber Security Centre Finland, operating under the Finnish Communications Regulatory Authority, for getting the approval for the national classification level Confidential.

Bittium Tough Mobile designed for the classification level Confidential has a unique dual-boot functionality that makes Bittium Tough Mobile a device with two completely separate operating modes, Public and Confidential. This enables both professional use with high-level information security and personal use, e.g. using social media applications, with the same device. The user himself can switch between the two different modes.


Bittium Tough Mobile smartphone includes several innovative features designed for authorities where reliable and secure communication is needed. The device's structure is a combination of extreme durability and the usability of a modern smartphone. (Photo Bittium)

Ayoshi

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Re: Military cellphones / smartphones
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2018, 08:33:17 AM »
Smartphones to win a battle – US 10th Mountain fields new Field Artillery technology | Army Recognition - 05 May 2018 07:36
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U.S. soldiers work on improving their efficiency by using Field Artillery command and control capabilities via modernized software on Android-enabled smartphones. The upgrades, such as receiving digital maps to enhance the ability to send precision target coordinates, are part of the Army's modernization effort known as Precision Fires-Dismounted.

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PF-D reduces the required training time, compared with legacy systems, because of its revamped, intuitive user interface that is similar in functionality to commercial handheld devices. Also, the power-generation burden has decreased because PF-D is smaller, lighter and eliminates stand-alone hardware from the old system.

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The Army's Project Manager Mission Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, oversees PF-D's acquisition, integration, testing and fielding. At the program onset, PM Mission Command partnered with Program Executive Officer Soldier to integrate PF-D onto the Nett Warrior.

< snipped >

Several thousand PF-D systems will be deployed across the Army in the next few years.

Ayoshi

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Re: Military cellphones / smartphones
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2018, 01:51:42 AM »
The US Military Just Partially Banned Geolocatable Cellphones. That’s a Start. | defenseone - August 6, 2018
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In January, researchers discovered that Strava, a “social network for athletes,” enabled anyone to track users wearing a FitBit or similar IoT device. This is a potential threat to  individuals, but an even greater one to a military: by looking at Strava tracks around the globe, researchers could track large-scale troop movements and even identify secret military bases.

Now, it’s been revealed that the Polar fitness tracker was exposing user data as well. Researchers reportedly discovered 6,400 users in sensitive locations, “including the NSA, the White House, MI6 in London, and the Guantanamo Bay detention center in Cuba.” Even names were exposed, including officers at the French DGSE in Paris and the Russian GRU in Moscow. The researchers could even apparently trace—as explained in a disturbing report—the movement of a single intelligence officer to their home.

The Pentagon has begun to grasp the implications. On Aug. 3, Defense leaders issued a department-wide edict: “Effective immediately, Defense Department personnel are prohibited from using geolocation features and functionality on government and non-government-issued devices, applications, and services while in locations designated as operational areas.”