Author Topic: China's indigenous aircraft carriers (Type 001A class, etc.)  (Read 650 times)

MCentaur

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China's indigenous aircraft carriers (Type 001A class, etc.)
« on: September 24, 2016, 09:23:18 AM »
This topic is not to be confused with the other thread on the currently active Liaoning, which was formerly the Russian-built Varyag.

China's first indigenous aircraft carrier nearing completion

IHS Jane's 360 - 17 August 2016

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The imagery shows that, with the addition of the bow section and other exterior components, the assembly of the Type 001A CV is nearly complete. Two of the component fabrication areas adjacent to the dry dock are largely clear of materials, indicating that work on the Type 001A hull is nearing an end. Few uninstalled components remain present, including the forward aircraft elevator.

<snipped>

Across the harbour from the Type 001A's dry dock, work on Dalian's three Type 052D DDG hulls is progressing. One hull remains in dry dock, with two pier side. The first hull is visibly complete and is undergoing sea trials, while the second hull, launched on 3 August 2016, awaits the installation of various components.

Berthed at the northern end of the ship yard, the second hull lacks many sensor and weapon fittings. Notably absent are the forward 130 mm gun, the forward vertical launch system, and various sensor fittings, including the Type 366 radar mounted atop the bridge.

Airbus Defence and Space imagery showing the Type 001A hull in dry dock at Dalian. The hull is largely complete, with just one aircraft elevator, superstructure, and some deck sections left to be added. Source: CNES 2016, Distribution Airbus DS/© 2016 IHS
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MCentaur

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Re: China's indigenous aircraft carriers (Type 001A class, etc.)
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2016, 11:02:24 AM »
Catobar for their third planned carrier?

China flight testing modified J-15 for CATOBAR operations

IHS Jane's 360 - 21 September 2016

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Expectations that China's third carrier, which is commonly referred to as the Type 002, will be equipped with catapults were reinforced in early August when images emerged on Chinese online forums showing the country's land-based aircraft carrier mock-up in Wuhan, Hubei Province, undergoing modifications.

Most significantly, the ski-jump section had been removed from the mock-up.



Airbus Defence and Space imagery showing a Chinese navy shore-based catapult test and training complex under construction at Huangdicun Airbase. Source: CNES 2016, Distribution Airbus DS / 2016 IHS
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MCentaur

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Re: China's indigenous aircraft carriers (Type 001A class, etc.)
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2016, 06:53:27 PM »
Navy Recognition

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China: Island Fitted to Second PLAN Aircraft Carrier "Type 001A"
 
Via our patner East Pendulum: Spotters photos taken in Dalian yesterday show that the second Chinese aircraft carrier, the Type 001A, has received its island. This is another step towards the launch of the vessel expected to happen by early 2017.

(...SNIPPED)
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dr demented

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Re: China's indigenous aircraft carriers (Type 001A class, etc.)
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2017, 12:34:05 PM »
http://cimsec.org/chinas-aircraft-carrier-dreadnought-or-doctrinal-dilemma/32736

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China’s Aircraft Carrier: ‘Dreadnought’ or ‘Doctrinal Dilemma’?
June 13, 2017

By Captain Gurpreet S. Khurana, PhD

Less than five years after the China commissioned its first Soviet-origin aircraft carrier Liaoning in September 2012, it launched its first-ever domestic carrier – the Type 001A – on 26 April 2017. The new carrier is likely to be commissioned in 2020 as Shadong. Even though the Liaoning and the Type 001A are medium-sized conventionally powered (non-nuclear) vessels equipped with aircraft ski-jumps (not catapults), and thus far less capable than the super-carriers operated by the United States, the occasion was celebrated in China as a major achievement symbolic of China’s ‘great power’ status. A report indicates that a larger, next generation Type 002 carrier equipped with a steam catapult has been under construction since March 2015, and its follow-on carriers may be nuclear powered. 

The launch of the Type 001A is, indeed, a milestone in the development of China as a major naval power. It reminds us of the famous battleship HMS Dreadnought commissioned into the Royal Navy in 1906. The Dreadnought was a highly successful warship induction marking the dawn of the 20th century warfare at sea. It became iconic of a transformative naval capability in a manner that the older existing warships of the world began to fade into obsolescence as pre-Dreadnoughts. The celebration in Beijing similarly justified, given the achievement of China’s defense-technological endeavor within a relatively short period of time. It stands out rather conspicuously in comparison to India, which has been operating aircraft carriers since 1961, but is yet to commission its first indigenous carrier named Vikrant.

Moving from ‘symbolism’ to ‘substance,’ such ‘flat-tops’ are indeed valuable platforms for maritime force-projection, which, for centuries, has been an important naval mission of all major power navies. However, given China’s maritime geography and the kind of insecurities it encounters today from vastly superior adversarial navies of the United States and Japan operating in the western Pacific Rim, the PLA Navy’s growing doctrinal reliance on carriers seems to be an aberration. It may have been more prudent for China to focus on bolstering its existing Anti-Access/ Area-Denial (A2AD) operational doctrine with the naval doctrine of ‘sea-denial’ – particularly given the PLA Navy’s traditional strengths in submarine, sea-mine and missile warfare – rather than diluting its naval doctrine by adding the carrier-based ‘sea-control’ doctrine.

Chinese carriers will also be highly vulnerable in the western Pacific Rim, not only to the advanced navies, but also to the many unfriendly airbases and submarine bases of the littoral countries dotting the periphery of the East and South China Seas. It is well known that even the smaller countries in the region are building potent sea-denial capabilities against China. The recent induction of the six advanced Russian Kilo-class submarines into the Vietnamese Navy is a case in point. If a maritime conflict breaks out in the area, the PLA Navy carrier would surely be a prime target and any such successful targeting would be a major symbolic blow to China’s morale, and thus its war effort.

The Chinese believe that ‘sea-control’ is necessary to assert its maritime-territorial claims in the China Seas. This could have been achieved effectively – and at reduced risk – by optimally using the air-bases in the Chinese mainland and the occupied islands, which China is expanding through reclamation. Ironically, China’s island-building activity in the South China Sea has caused a major damage to China’s claim to its ‘peaceful rise’ theory, which is now being aggravated by its own carrier-building program. Furthermore, the program lacks operational credibility, much into the foreseeable future. It would take the PLA Navy many years to operationalize a full-fledged Carrier Task Force, and possibly decades to make it effective enough to achieve sea-control against advanced navies. Meanwhile, the process could cause an indelible dent in China’s objective to propagate a ‘benign’ and ‘constructive’ image in the Indo-Pacific region, including through its ‘One-Belt-One-Road’ (OBOR) initiative.

Chinese strategists also believe that carrier-based sea-control is necessary to protect their Sea Lines of Communication (SLOCs) in the Indian Ocean, as indicated by China’s recently articulated strategy of “open-seas protection” in its 2014 Defense White Paper. However, this could have been achieved – again effectively, and at reduced risk – by deploying its warships in its naval bases at strategic locations such as Djibouti and Gwadar.

China is likely to have at least three aircraft carriers in commission at any given time in the future. The Chinese have clearly gone too far ahead for any reappraisal of its aircraft-carrier program, possibly lured into the ‘command of the seas’ gambit of the major western naval powers, without factoring their own geostrategic conditions and circumstances. One may therefore, expect that the PLA Navy’s ‘doctrinal duality’ in terms of primacy to both ‘sea control’ and ‘sea denial’ may become its dilemma in the coming years.

Captain Gurpreet S Khurana, PhD, is Executive Director at the National Maritime Foundation (NMF), New Delhi.

Ayoshi

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Re: China's indigenous aircraft carriers (Type 001A class, etc.)
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2017, 03:22:08 AM »
China’s first homemade aircraft carrier to enter mooring trials next month | chinamil.com.cn - Time
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China’s first homemade aircraft carrier will likely enter mooring trials next month ahead of schedule, said Hu Wenming, general director of construction of the aircraft carrier, CCTV.com reported on Aug. 3.

Hu introduced that construction of China’s second aircraft carrier, also the country’s first homemade one, is going well after it hit the water in Dalian on April 26 this year. Hu added that the carrier will likely start mooring trials next month ahead of schedule to test if its equipment is able to meet the requirements for further sea trial.

< snipped >

Hu also disclosed that a total of 412 state-owned enterprises, private enterprises, and scientific research institutions in China have contributed to its development, occupying 77.4 percent of the total, which indicates that its construction is the result of national collective efforts.

Ayoshi

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Re: China's indigenous aircraft carriers (Type 001A class, etc.)
« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2017, 01:46:37 AM »
Construction of China's 2nd Aircraft Carrier for PLAN Progressing Faster than Expected | Navy Recognition - 10 August 2017
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Story originally published in French by our colleagues from East Pendulum
The construction of the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) second aircraft carrier (the first built indigenously in China) is progressing at a good pace and is now ahead of schedule according to the program director. The information was revealed in an interview conducted by Chinese national television CCTV. The vessel was launched in April this year.

Program Director HU Wen Ming is also the CEO of the Chinese naval group CSIC, which owns the Dalian shipyard where the new aircraft carrier is under construction. HU says propulsion system tests are currently underway. The first and third boilers are already on, and the steam turbines will soon follow.

Dockside testing, one of the major milestones in the project with the Chinese aircraft carrier set to operate on its own generators, could start within the next month.


Black smoke at the chimneys was spotted for the first time on 18 May 2017, less than a month after the second Chinese aircraft carrier was launched (Photo: 西北狼 216)
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Studies of the flow of the aircraft carrier according to the roll level of the ship.

CCTV video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2RVtU4ki6o