Author Topic: George Floyd and the riots that came after  (Read 792 times)

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 12164
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
George Floyd and the riots that came after
« on: June 02, 2020, 03:16:27 AM »
8 Minutes and 46 Seconds: How George Floyd Was Killed in Police Custody

The Times has reconstructed the death of George Floyd on May 25. Security footage, witness videos and official documents show how a series of actions by officers turned fatal.

By Evan Hill, Ainara Tiefenthäler, Christiaan Triebert, Drew Jordan, Haley Willis and Robin Stein

    Published May 31, 2020
    Updated June 1, 2020, 1:25 a.m. ET

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/31/us/george-floyd-investigation.html

On May 25, Minneapolis police officers arrested George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, after a deli employee called 911, accusing him of buying cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill. Seventeen minutes after the first squad car arrived at the scene, Mr. Floyd was unconscious and pinned beneath three police officers, showing no signs of life.

By combining videos from bystanders and security cameras, reviewing official documents and consulting experts, The New York Times reconstructed in detail the minutes leading to Mr. Floyd’s death. Our video shows officers taking a series of actions that violated the policies of the Minneapolis Police Department and turned fatal, leaving Mr. Floyd unable to breathe, even as he and onlookers called out for help.

The day after Mr. Floyd’s death, the Police Department fired all four of the officers involved in the episode, and on Friday the Hennepin County attorney, Mike Freeman, announced murder and manslaughter charges against Derek Chauvin, the officer who can be seen most clearly in witness videos pinning Mr. Floyd to the ground. Mr. Chauvin, who is white, kept his knee on Mr. Floyd’s neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds, according to the criminal complaint against him. Our video shows that Mr. Chauvin did not remove his knee even after Mr. Floyd lost consciousness, and for a full minute after paramedics arrived at the scene.

< Edited >

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 12164
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: George Floyd and the riots that came after
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2020, 03:23:43 AM »
The death of George Floyd: What video and other records show about his final minutes

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/05/30/video-timeline-george-floyd-death/?arc404=true

< Edited >

Unrest has since erupted in Minneapolis, where protesters have set fire to buildings, and in several cities across the country. The police officer was fired and has been charged with third-degree murder. His attorney did not respond to requests for comment. Three other officers also have been fired.

< Edited >

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 12164
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: George Floyd and the riots that came after
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2020, 02:42:54 PM »
Goldfein: ‘Every American should be outraged’ at police conduct in death of George Floyd
Stephen Losey

https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2020/06/02/goldfein-every-american-should-be-outraged-at-police-conduct-in-death-of-george-floyd/

Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Dave Goldfein denounced the death of George Floyd and the conduct of the Minneapolis police who killed him in a strongly-worded memo Monday night.

In the memo, distributed to Goldfein’s wing commanders and other commanders and obtained by Air Force Times, Goldfein called Floyd’s death “a national tragedy.”

In the memo, distributed to Goldfein’s wing commanders and other commanders and obtained by Air Force Times, Goldfein called Floyd’s death “a national tragedy.”

“Every American should be outraged that the conduct exhibited by police in Minneapolis can still happen in 2020,” Goldfein said.

Goldfein’s memo was sent hours after his top enlisted advisor, Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Kaleth Wright, who is black, posted a lengthy Twitter thread about the deaths of black men at the hands of police that declared, “I am George Floyd.”

< Edited >

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 12164
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: George Floyd and the riots that came after
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2020, 04:16:01 PM »
Chief Wright: ‘I am George Floyd,’ promises review of Air Force justice system
Stephen Losey
3 days ago

https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2020/06/01/chief-wright-i-am-george-floyd-promises-review-of-air-force-justice-system/

Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Kaleth Wright on Monday announced an independent review of the service’s justice system after a series of scathing reports that showed it disproportionately punishes young black airmen.

And in a lengthy, passionate Twitter thread posted as the nation continued to be roiled by protests and fury over racism, police brutality and the deaths of George Floyd and other black men at the hands of police, Chief Wright — who is the second black man in history to be the Air Force’s top enlisted leader — invoked several of their names and expressed solidarity with them.

< Edited >

Wright described his outrage at “watching another Black man die on television before our very eyes" — and said that his rank and position would not necessarily be enough to spare him, either. Wright said that, “like most other Black men in America,” his heart starts racing when he sees blue police lights behind him.

< Edited >

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 12164
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: George Floyd and the riots that came after
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2020, 05:14:54 PM »
Here’s What The Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone Protesters Are Demanding
Jack Brewster
Jun 13, 2020,02:25pm EDT

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jackbrewster/2020/06/13/heres-what-the-capitol-hill-autonomous-zone-protesters-are-demanding/#195c817f36c5

< Edited >

KEY FACTS

The self-declared autonomous zone was established by protesters who barricaded the area around a Seattle police precinct on June 8 and since then, demonstrators have offered movie screenings, poetry performances, free food, medical supplies, and more in a makeshift camping area.

Sections of the sidewalk have been partitioned for a “Conversation Café” where a sign invites people to “talk about antifascism” and a “No-cop Co-Op” where free food is handed out.

The reason the protesters are there is clear — Floyd’s death ignited a spark that led to unrest that played out in cities across the country — but the demands of the protests are not, evident by the divergent messaging coming from people within the zone.

One wall inside the zone lists three demands — defund the Police Department; fund community health; and drop all criminal charges against protesters, the New York Times reports — while another fence lists five.

On Medium, the “Free Capitol Hill” movement published a list of 30 demands in a post that includes the “de-gentrification of Seattle, starting with rent control” and the “abolition of imprisonment,” while the Seattle Times reports that some protesters simply want to turn the police precinct into a community center.

Local Black Lives Matter leaders have said they will vacate the area once their demands have been met and have called the occupation “temporary,” but for now, the protest zone has won the tacit approval of the city’s government, the New York Times reports, and on Friday no police were visible in the area, according to the Wall Street Journal.

KEY BACKGROUND

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan has faced criticism from all angles. Carmen Best, the city’s police chief, said in a video statement on Youtube Thursday that the decision to leave the police station was not hers and that she was upset with how the situation has developed. “I’m angry about how all this came about,” she said. Meanwhile, some protesters have directed their rage at Durkan for not pushing through more reform, and for not responding more forcefully to the harsh crowd control tactics used by police to quell the protests. On Tuesday, protesters in Seattle took over City Hall for about an hour and demanded her resignation hours after a Black Lives Matter group sued the Seattle Police Department, alleging that the city has violated the constitutional rights of demonstrators by using rough crowd control tactics. Durkan and Police Chief Best have tweaked police tactics, including ordering officers to display badge numbers and banning the use of tear gas for at least 30 days. Durkan has also promised to invest at least $100 million into minority communities and to establish a community-driven Black Commission. The city council is looking into tweaking the police budget as well.

< Edited >


=====