Author Topic: B-21 "Raider"/Northrop LRS-B/future USAF stealth bomber  (Read 1552 times)

MCentaur

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B-21 "Raider"/Northrop LRS-B/future USAF stealth bomber
« on: September 24, 2016, 09:06:54 AM »
Reuters

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U.S. | Mon Sep 19, 2016 | 1:13pm EDT
New B-21 bomber named 'Raider': U.S. Air Force

Northrop Grumman Corp's B-21 long-range bomber will be called "Raider," U.S. Air Force Secretary Deborah James said on Monday.

The estimated $80 billion program has been shrouded in secrecy since its inception for fear of revealing military secrets to potential enemies.

The bomber was named after the Doolittle raiders, who early in World War Two carried out bombing missions over Japan, James said while speaking at a conference.

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Ayoshi

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B-21 Raider / Long Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B)
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2016, 03:50:10 PM »
Previous topic: B-21 "Raider"/Northrop LRS-B/future USAF stealth bomber

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Air Force Awards Contract for Long Range Strike Bomber | defense.gov
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WASHINGTON, Oct. 27, 2015 — The Air Force announced today the contract award of engineering and manufacturing development and early production for the Long Range Strike Bomber, or LRS-B, to Northrop Grumman Corp.

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cal to National Defense

Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said the LRS-B is critical to national defense and is a top priority for the Air Force. “We face a complex security environment,” she said. “It’s imperative our Air Force invests in the right people, technology, capability, and training to defend the nation and its interests – at an affordable cost.”

The future threat will evolve through the introduction of advanced air defense systems and development of more capable surface to air missile systems. The LRS-B is designed to replace the Air Force’s aging fleets of bombers – ranging in age from 50+ years for the B-52 to 17+ years for the B-2 – with a long range, highly survivable bomber capable of penetrating and operating in tomorrow’s anti-access, area denial environment. The LRS-B provides the strategic agility to launch from the United States and strike any target, any time around the globe.



« Last Edit: September 20, 2017, 09:11:08 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: B-21 Raider
« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2016, 03:53:57 PM »
Air Force Unveils Name of Future Stealth Bomber as B-21 'Raider' | military.com
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The U.S. Air Force has unveiled the name of the future stealth bomber as the B-21 Raider.

Paying homage to the inspiration for the name, Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James handed the mic to World War II veteran Richard E. Cole, the 101-year-old retired lieutenant colonel and the last surviving "Doolittle Raider," to make the announcement on Monday at the Air Force Association's annual Air, Space & Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Maryland, just south of Washington, D.C.

Cole served as co-pilot to Lt. Col. James Doolittle, who led 16 B-25 bombers and 80 crew members from an aircraft carrier in the western Pacific Ocean on a strike to target factory areas and military installations in and around Tokyo on April 18, 1942 -- a successful mission that helped boost morale after the attacks on Pearl Harbor.


Artist's concept of the B-21 Bomber (U.S. Air Force image)

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Northrop Grumman beat Boeing for B-21 on cost | IHS Jane's 360 - 28 October 2016
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Cost was the deciding factor in the US Air Force's (USAF's) decision to award Northrop Grumman a development contract for the B-21 Raider bomber aircraft, a USAF acquisition official confirmed on 26 October.

Both Northrop Grumman's and Boeing's bids for the work met technical requirements, Lieutenant General Arnold Bunch said during a conference sponsored by the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). "If we weren't comfortable that technically it could be done then we would have done something different," the general said. "But we felt comfortable with the technical approach of both, that they could both do it; then it comes down to the cost."

He was referring to information in a new Government Accountability Office (GAO) bomber protest decision report released on 25 October. According to the GAO document, Northrop Grumman's offering came in at a lower total weighted cost and total estimated cost.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2016, 04:38:55 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: B-21 Raider / Long Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B)
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2017, 06:58:25 AM »
US Air Force could substantially increase B-21 buy | IHS Jane's 360 - 26 May 2017
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The US Air Force (USAF) could boost its recommended B-21 Raider Long-Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B) buy to as many as 145 aircraft, based on 25 May testimony from USAF officials.

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During the US House hearing, Mike Gallagher, representative from Wisconsin, cited a 2015 US Air Force Association study that found a fleet of 200 bombers, with an operational force of 150 to 160 aircraft, would be necessary for national leaders, for conventional and nuclear options, to deter and defeat any foe. The study recommended a modernised bomber force of approximately 200 aircraft to sustain leadership in long-range precision strike for years to come.

The study also said if the United States only procures 100 new bombers and keeps its existing force of 20 Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit bombers, its total bomber inventory will be 120 aircraft by 2045, with roughly 100 combat-coded bombers available for operations. The study also said the Boeing B-52 Stratofortresses and Rockwell B-1 Lancers currently in inventory will reach the end of their service lives by 2045, leaving the 20 B-2s.

Ayoshi

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Re: B-21 Raider / Long Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B)
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2017, 09:08:40 PM »
Rand ‘cautiously optimistic’ about B-21, looking to B-2 for lessons learned | Defense news
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Rand also said that the service and Northrop are working together to form an informal group to study the B-2 program for lessons that can be applied to the next-generation bomber.

“We’re already putting together a team to make sure that we do a deep dive” into the history of the B-2, which was also produced by Northrop. “What were the strengths? What were the weaknesses? Where could we have gotten better on our side? How could it have gotten better on their side?”

Perhaps the biggest lesson Rand has already taken from the B-2, whose production was famously curtailed at just 21 due to cost overruns and delays, is ensuring the program remains on track will be vital to any hopes of hitting a production minimum of 100 planes.

adroth

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Re: B-21 Raider / Long Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B)
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2017, 10:09:22 PM »
Rapid Capabilities Office Watching B-21 Stealth Costs ‘Closely’
By COLIN CLARK
on September 19, 2017 at 11:10 AM

https://breakingdefense.com/2017/09/rapid-capabilities-office-watching-b-21-stealth-costs-closely/

AFA: In what may be a hint of things to come, the head of the Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office says his office is keeping a close eye on the B-21 bomber’s stealth costs. While he didn’t indicate there were any cost overruns or scheduler problems, the fact that RCO Director Randall Walden mentioned this for the first time in public would seem to indicate a heightened level of interest.

Almost everything about the B-21 Raider is classified, except for its price, so mention of anything is worth noting. The Air Force plans to buy more than 100 of the long range strike aircraft and to pay Northrop $550 million a copy. The first 21 aircraft will comprise five batches of Low Rate Initial Production aircraft.

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Ayoshi

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Re: B-21 "Raider"/Northrop LRS-B/future USAF stealth bomber
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2017, 02:27:54 AM »
B-21 cost info to stay secret despite new Air Force leadership | Defense news
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Out of the Air Force’s top three acquisition priorities, the B-21 Raider is its most secretive, with only a few details disclosed to the public, such as the estimated price per aircraft and a list of the major contractors.

The service has taken a hard line against releasing the value of the development contract awarded to Northrop Grumman in 2015, with officials saying that doing so would give adversaries information that would allow them to extrapolate on the bomber’s design.

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Air Force leaders claim that the B-21 program is going swimmingly and has remained on budget and on schedule. Earlier this year, Gen. Stephen Wilson, the Air Force’s vice chief of staff, told lawmakers it had recently completed its preliminary design review.

The service plans to buy at least 100 Raiders — although that number could change as a result of the Trump administration’s defense strategy review and the Air Force’s bomber road map — at a price of about $550 million (in 2010 dollars) per copy.

The engineering and manufacturing development phase is being carried out under a separate, cost-plus contract that is estimated to amount to about $21.4 billion.

Ayoshi

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Re: B-21 "Raider"/Northrop LRS-B/future USAF stealth bomber
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2018, 08:59:54 AM »
The new B-21 Raider could hit a big milestone this year | Defense news
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Walden also acknowledged later that, while B-21 Raider production has not started, the office has begun component testing and put a subscale model of the bomber through wind tunnel tests.

He declined to detail the scale of the model or where it has been tested, but noted that there are relatively few wind tunnel facilities in the United States, such as the Propulsion Wind Tunnel Facility in Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee.

“Any aircraft program that’s going to go through development, you’re going to do wind tunnel testing, and we’re no different,” he said.

“You’re going to go from an estimate on a piece of paper and drawings to the right things that it would take to get you to build out the system, and wind tunnel testing is one of them. We’re following that logic because it makes sense from an engineering point of view.”

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The Air Force wants to buy at least 100 B-21s. It awarded Northrop Grumman a cost-plus engineering and manufacturing development contract in October 2015, which was estimated to have a value of a $21.4 billion in 2010 dollars. The service has said each aircraft is set to cost about $550 million in 2010 dollars, and it is using a separate fixed-price contract vehicle for the production phase.