Author Topic: U.S Army Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV) Program  (Read 494 times)

Ayoshi

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See also: Next Generation Combat Vehicle: Abrams & Bradley replacement

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General Dynamics Griffin III tracked armored candidate to replace Bradley IFV of US Army OMFV program | Army Recognition - 06 May 2020 08:36

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In June 2018, in part due to congressional concerns, the U.S. Army announced a new modernization strategy and designated the Next Generation Combat Vehicle (NGCV) as the program to replace the M-2 Bradley. In October 2018, Army leadership decided to redesignate the NGCV as the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV) and to add additional vehicle programs to what would be called the NGCV Program.

On March 29, 2019, the U.S. Army issued a Request for Proposal (RFP)45 to industry for the OMFV. The Army has characterized its requirements as “aggressive” and noted industry might not be able to meet all requirements. Major requirements included the ability to transport two OMFVs in a C17 aircraft which will likely require the vehicle to have the ability to accommodate add-on armor; a threshold (minimum) requirement for a 30 mm cannon and a second generation forward looking infra-red radar (FLIR); and objective (desired) requirements for a 50 mm cannon and a third generation FLIR. By October 1, 2019, the industry was required to submit prototype vehicles to the Army for consideration and in the second quarter of FY2020 (Fiscal Year 2020), the Army planned to select two vendors to build 14 prototypes for further evaluation

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Despite numerous upgrades over its lifetime, the M-2 Bradley has what some consider a notable limitation. Although the M-2 Bradley can accommodate seven fully equipped infantry soldiers, infantry squads consist of nine soldiers. As a result, “each mechanized [ABCT] infantry platoon has to divide three squads between four Bradleys, meaning that all the members of a squad are not able to ride in the same vehicle.” 10 This limitation raises both command and control and employment challenges for Bradley-mounted infantry squads and platoons

Because the OMFV would be an important weapon system in the Army’s Armored Brigade Combat Teams (ABCTs), Congress may be concerned with how the OMFV would impact the effectiveness of ground forces over the full spectrum of military operations. Moreover, Congress might also be concerned with how much more capable the OMFV is projected to be over the M-2 Bradley to ensure that it is not just a costly marginal improvement over the current system. A number of past unsuccessful Army acquisition programs have served to heighten congressional oversight of Army programs, and the OMFV may be subject to a high degree of congressional interest.


On April 22, 2020, General Dynamics showed its Griffin III demonstrator, a candidate for the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV) Program of the U.S. Army. (Picture source Twitter account @nicholadrummond)
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Three vendors showcased prospective platforms in the fall of 2018 including Griffin III from General Dynamics Land Systems, CV90 from BAE Systems and KF41 from Rheinmetall. (Picture source Army Recognition)


Ayoshi

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Re: U.S Army Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV) Program
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2020, 10:29:19 AM »
Raytheon Rheinmetall Land Systems to re-compete with Lynx KF41 IFV modified for US Army OMFV program | Army Recognition - 06 May 2020 15:18
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The Lynx IFV will provide the Army a next-generation lethal, powerful, lifesaving and adaptable fighting vehicle that represents a true leap ahead capability compared to legacy vehicles. The Lynx can also be adapted to enable optional manning features, such as remote operation of the vehicle and Lance turret.

The modular survivability systems of the Lynx provide unprecedented flexibility for customers to cope with the wide variety of threats faced across the spectrum of conflict. The ballistic and mine protection packages can be easily exchanged, even in the field if needed, while the full spectrum of threats have been taken into account, including roof protection against cluster munitions. The Lynx KF41 with Lance 2.0 has been designed not only for passive and reactive systems, but also for an active protection system to defeat rocket-propelled grenades and antitank guided missiles.

The KF41 Lynx can be fitted with a new generation of turret that can be armed with an automatic cannon up to 50 mm caliber featuring hunter-killer, killer-killer, remotely controlled weapon station, dual multi-mission pods, fully integrated situational awareness sensor suite.


KF-41 Lynx tracked armored IFV Infantry Fighting Vehicle that was presented at AUSA defense exhibition (Picture source Twitter account Raytheon)