Author Topic: Deepfake Technology  (Read 192 times)

Ayoshi

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Deepfake Technology
« on: January 08, 2020, 04:03:04 AM »
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There's a terrifying trend on the internet that could be used to ruin your reputation, and no one knows how to stop it
Jul 10, 2019, 11:01 PM

* The rise of deepfakes, or videos created using AI that can make it look like someone said or did something they have never done, has raised concerns over how such technology could be used to spread misinformation and damage reputations.

* High-profile figures such as Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, former President Barack Obama, and "Wonder Woman" actress Gal Godot have all appeared in deepfake videos in recent years.
Congress has been discussing legal measures that could be taken to mitigate the potential damage inflicted by deepfake video content, but doing so without impacting free speech could prove challenging.

* Using algorithms to identify deepfakes could also be difficult considering those who are creating such videos will likely find ways to circumvent such detection methods, experts say.

< snipped >

It's unclear precisely when deepfakes were invented, but the trend began to gain widespread attention in late 2017 when a fake porn video purporting to feature "Wonder Woman" actress Gal Gadot was published on Reddit by a user who went by the pseudonym "deepfakes," as Vice reported at the time.

Since then, a range of doctored videos featuring high-profile celebrities and politicians have appeared online — some of which are meant to be satirical, others which have portrayed public figures in a negative light, and others which were created to prove a point. Videos of famous movie scenes that had been digitally altered to feature actor Nicholas Cage's face went viral in early 2018, representing the lighter side of the spectrum showing how such tools could be used to foster entertainment.

https://www.businessinsider.com/dangerous-deepfake-technology-spreading-cannot-be-stopped-2019-7


Ayoshi

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Re: Deepfake Technology
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2020, 04:06:05 AM »
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Politics, porn and toxic world of deepfake
15 Dec 2019 12:09

Deepfakes are videos produced through the use of artificial intelligence. Melding images and sound, using things like face grafts, body transfers or voice imitations, they make people appear to say things they never said and do things they never did. They appear so real it is often difficult to tell if they are fake.

For now, the vast majority of deepfakes, 96 percent to be more precise, target women, mostly celebrities, where one woman's face is placed to appear on another's body, many times in the making of fake pornographic videos.

Bill Posters, digital artist and researcher, explained to The Listening Post's Tariq Nafi that: "It's women's bodies, identities and rights that are being transgressed and oppressed basically by quite a small but quite a prolific body of actors that are taking famous celebrity female actor's faces and transplanting those into pornography scenes, and there are huge websites that profit millions of dollars from displaying and sharing and streaming these kinds of deep fake pieces of pornography."

The bigger concern is this: Deepfakes could be used to spread misinformation, mess with politics, and manipulate electorates by fooling journalists and voters. And there are real-life examples already playing out across the world.

https://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/listeningpost/2019/12/politics-porn-toxic-world-deepfake-191215101055666.html


Ayoshi

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Re: Deepfake Technology
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2020, 04:11:05 AM »
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/611146/the-us-military-is-funding-an-effort-to-catch-deepfakes-and-other-ai-trickery/

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The US military is funding an effort to catch deepfakes and other AI trickery
May 23, 2018

The Department of Defense is funding a project that will try to determine whether the increasingly real-looking fake video and audio generated by artificial intelligence might soon be impossible to distinguish from the real thing—even for another AI system.

This summer, under a project funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the world’s leading digital forensics experts will gather for an AI fakery contest. They will compete to generate the most convincing AI-generated fake video, imagery, and audio—and they will also try to develop tools that can catch these counterfeits automatically.

The contest will include so-called “deepfakes,” videos in which one person’s face is stitched onto another person’s body. Rather predictably, the technology has already been used to generate a number of counterfeit celebrity porn videos. But the method could also be used to create a clip of a politician saying or doing something outrageous.

DARPA’s technologists are especially concerned about a relatively new AI technique that could make AI fakery almost impossible to spot automatically. Using what are known as generative adversarial networks, or GANs, it is possible to generate stunningly realistic artificial imagery.

https://techcrunch.com/2020/01/07/facebook-bans-deceptive-deepfakes-and-some-misleadingly-modified-media/

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Facebook bans deceptive deepfakes and some misleadingly modified media

Facebook  wants to be the arbiter of truth after all. At least when it comes to intentionally misleading deepfakes and heavily manipulated and/or synthesized media content, such as AI-generated photorealistic human faces that look like real people but aren’t.

< snipped >

While still relatively nascent as a technology, deepfakes have shown themselves to be catnip to the media which loves the spectacle they create. As a result, the tech has landed unusually quickly on legislators’ radars as a disinformation risk — California implemented a ban on political deepfakes around elections this fall, for example — so Facebook is likely hoping to score some quick and easy political points by moving in step with legislators even as it applies its own version of a ban.

Bickert’s blog post also fishes for further points, noting Facebook’s involvement in a Deep Fake Detection Challenge which was announced last fall — “to produce more research and open source tools to detect deepfakes”.

While says Facebook has been working with news agency Reuters  to offer free online training courses for journalists to help reporters identify manipulated visuals.


Ayoshi

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Re: Deepfake Technology
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2020, 04:13:03 AM »
You Won’t Believe What Obama Says In This Video!
BuzzFeedVideo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cQ54GDm1eL0