Author Topic: B1-B Lancer  (Read 2559 times)

Ayoshi

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B1-B Lancer
« on: November 06, 2016, 02:51:44 AM »
af.mil

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Background

The B-1A was initially developed in the 1970s as a replacement for the B-52. Four prototypes of this long-range, high speed (Mach 2.2) strategic bomber were developed and tested in the mid-1970s, but the program was canceled in 1977 before going into production. Flight testing continued through 1981.

The B-1B is an improved variant initiated by the Reagan administration in 1981. Major changes included and additional structure to increase payload by 74,000 pounds, an improved radar and reduction of the radar cross section by an order of magnitude. The inlet was extensively modified as part of this RCS reduction, necessitating a reduction in maximum speed to Mach 1.2.

The first production B-1 flew in October 1984, and the first B-1B was delivered to Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, in June 1985. Initial operational capability was achieved on Oct. 1, 1986. The final B-1B was delivered May 2, 1988.

The United States eliminated the nuclear mission for the B-1 in 1994. Even though the Air Force expended no further funding to maintain nuclear capabilities, the B-1 was still considered a heavy bomber equipped for nuclear armament until 2007. The conversion to conventional only began in November 2007 under the original START treaty and was completed in March 2011 under the New START treaty. To make that conversion possible, two steps were taken:
During the first step a metal cylindrical sleeve was welded into the aft attachment point of each set of B-1 pylon attachments. This prevented installing B-1 Air Launched Cruise Missile pylons.

During the second step two nuclear armament-unique cable connectors in each of the B-1 weapons bays were removed. This prevented the pre-arm signal from reaching the weapons.

The B-1B holds almost 50 world records for speed, payload, range, and time of climb in its class. The National Aeronautic Association recognized the B-1B for completing one of the 10 most memorable record flights for 1994. The most recent records were made official in 2004.

The B-1B was first used in combat in support of operations against Iraq during Operation Desert Fox in December 1998. In 1999, six B-1s were used in Operation Allied Force, delivering more than 20 percent of the total ordnance while flying less than 2 percent of the combat sorties.

During the first six months of Operation Enduring Freedom, eight B-1s dropped nearly 40 percent of the total tonnage delivered by coalition air forces. This included nearly 3,900 JDAMs, or 67 percent of the total. In Operation Iraqi Freedom, the aircraft flew less than 1 percent of the combat missions while delivering 43 percent of the JDAMs used. The B-1 continues to be deployed today, flying missions daily in support of continuing operations.


Photos taken from military.com

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http://www.boeing.com/defense/b-1b-bomber/

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B-1B Lancer Milestones

April 30 2015   Boeing Upgrades to Keep B-1 Bomber Soaring for Decades to Come
Jan 22 2014   US Air Force Receives 1st B-1 Equipped with Boeing Integrated Battle Station
July 20 2012   Boeing Receives Lot 2 Production Contract Award for B-1 Integrated Battle Station
April 09 2012   Boeing to Upgrade B-1 Navigation System for US Air Force
Feb 27 2012   Boeing B-1 Bomber Completes 10,000th Combat Mission
« Last Edit: November 19, 2016, 07:10:06 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: B1-B Lancer
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2016, 02:54:06 AM »
For the first time in 10 years a B-1 bomber conducted CAS training “in the vicinity of Australia” | The Aviationist - Nov 04 2016
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On Oct. 25, a U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer assigned to the 34th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron and deployed to Guam from its homebase at Ellsworth AFB, S.D., conducted integration training with Royal Australian Air Force JTACs (joint terminal air controllers.)

Role of the JTACs, previously known as FACs (Forward Air Controllers), is to provide precision terminal attack guidance of CAS (close air support) assets from a forward position.

Indeed, their role is to act as a sort of “broker” between the commander of the troops on the ground and the pilot, working embedded on a patrol, in the vicinity of the enemy, in an armored vehicle, or from the Tactical Operations Center of a Forward Operating Base.

Through the  ROVER (Remote Operations Video Enhanced Receiver) system made available by the pods carried by several aircraft (such as the Advanced Targeting Forward Looking Infrared – ATFLIR – pod that the F-18s carry on the left side of the fuselage or the Sniper pod in case of the B-1), the JTACs are able to receive realtime footage from above on a portable terminal similar to a Playstation. Such live video streaming is used to determine whether the pilot is cueing the weapons to the correct ground target (and avoid friendly fire or collateral damage).

adroth

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Re: B1-B Lancer
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2016, 10:37:31 PM »
Photo c/o USAF


Ayoshi

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Re: B1-B Lancer
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2017, 11:57:26 PM »
US B-1B Lancers conduct joint drills with RoKAF | IHS Jane's 360 - 11 July 2017
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Two US Air Force (USAF) Boeing (Rockwell) B-1B Lancer strategic bombers conducted joint drills with the Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) on 7 July in a show of force directed at North Korea following Pyongyang’s test-launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) three days earlier.


Two USAF B-1B Lancers assigned to the 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron fly with South Korean F-15 and USAF F-16 fighters over the Korean Peninsula on 7 July. Source: US Air Force

adroth

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Re: B1-B Lancer
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2017, 03:42:57 PM »

Ayoshi

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Re: B1-B Lancer
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2018, 01:38:28 AM »
Lockheed Martin hands over first AGM-158C missiles to USAF operational units | Air Recognition - 19 December 2018 12:16


A Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) launched from a US Air Force B-1B Lancer during flight testing in August 2013 (Credit: DARPA)

Ayoshi

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Re: B1-B Lancer
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2019, 04:31:52 AM »
https://www.janes.com/article/91388/afa-2019-us-air-force-considering-divesting-b-1bs-in-favour-of-b-21s-other-bomber-improvements

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AFA 2019: US Air Force considering divesting B-1Bs in favour of B-21s, other bomber improvements
18 September 2019

The USAF is therefore considering retiring those B-1Bs that could not be returned to fully operational status and diverting that money to bomber portfolio improvements including long-range precision strategic weapons and Boeing B-52 Stratofortress re-engining. New B-52 engines would not only keep the aircraft viable but would also decrease the service's aerial refuelling tanker requirement, Gen Goldfein said. This will be important as the USAF will need to tackle the vast distances of the Pacific in near-peer competition in the region.


The Rockwell B-1B with its wings swept forward. The US Air Force’s top officer said this configuration, in addition to flying at slow speeds and medium altitude, has led to significant structural deficiencies with the platform. Source: IHS Markit/Patrick Allen