Author Topic: Metro Manila Rail Commuter Maintenance Depot Construction Project (2001)  (Read 1246 times)

adroth

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https://www.jica.go.jp/english/our_work/evaluation/oda_loan/post/2001/pdf/e_project_46_all.pdf

The objective of this project was to construct a rolling stock maintenance depot for 90 diesel-electric locomotives in the Food Terminal Institute (FTI) area 18-km south of central Manila, thereby improving the rolling stock maintenance system which was causing services to deteriorate through delays and cancellations, etc.

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Efficiency

At the time of appraisal, the project was scheduled to be completed by February 1986, but was delayed by four years to February 1990. This delay was the result of the political confusion incidental to the change of authority that occurred in the Philippines during the same period and which led to shortages in local currency financing.
Moreover, changes were made to the initial plans meaning that 10 locomotives
1 Procurement of spare parts for rolling stock was for the first year after project completion only. 2
 
(DEL-5000 type) were procured in May 1992. Based on the introduction of these new locomotives, passenger transport volumes (people/kilometer) on Metro Manila commuter line services in 1993 were double the level of the previous year, indicating sweeping improvements. Such can be seen as the result of the procurement of locomotives, the shortage of which was acting as a major hindrance to the operation of Metro Manila commuter lines.

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« Last Edit: December 08, 2019, 03:20:12 AM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: Metro Manila Rail Commuter Maintenance Depot Construction Project (2001)
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2019, 03:22:02 AM »
2.5. Sustainability

PNR liabilities have continuously exceeded its assets since 1995, and the financial situation of the organization has been deteriorating steadily. One of the main reasons for the deficits is the large share of costs occupied by personnel expenses. The Philippine government has also reduced its subsidies to PNR and has requested the organization to slim down its operations. In fiscal 1999, personnel expenses accounted for over 85% of operating costs, and even in terms of the absolute amount, it was not possible to finance these expenses using operating profits. As mentioned above, budgetary shortfalls have led to shortages in spare parts and so on (Table 5 below).

In 1996, PNR had a total of 2,338 employees, but this number dropped steadily in the four years thereafter, and in August 2000 stood at 1,978. As of January 2001, the Rolling Stock Maintenance Department (RSMD), which is responsible for the maintenance of rolling stock, employed 394 people (21 managers, 38 engineers, 332 skilled workers, and 3 unskilled workers). Of this number, 77 people (against the
planned level of 60) are currently employed at the rolling stock maintenance depot that was newly constructed using ODA loan funds, 35 of whom are actually positioned in the department.

Since PNR is not hiring new staff, aging is advancing among personnel and many employees are in their forties and fifties. Given the fact that inspection and maintenance operations are not being conducted according to schedule, PNR has responded that it has secured sufficient employees in quantitative terms, however, it indicates qualitative problems, particularly among engineering staff. It is
also reported that insufficient training is giving rise to problems in that workers are not proficient in the operating methods of some of the inspection and maintenance equipment installed at the rolling stock maintenance depot. There are concerns about the sustainability of the project in light of the current circumstances within PNR including its deteriorating finances, the aging of personnel and the maintenance of skills levels.