Author Topic: "Abominable" and the 9-dashed-line  (Read 461 times)

adroth

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"Abominable" and the 9-dashed-line
« on: October 19, 2019, 12:04:14 AM »

adroth

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Re: "Abominable" and the 9-dashed-line
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2019, 01:21:08 AM »
Malaysia orders China map cut from 'Abominable' film as furor widens
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https://www.reuters.com/article/us-malaysia-southchinasea-film-idUSKBN1WW10K

KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - Malaysia’s film censors have ordered a scene removed from the animated movie “Abominable” which shows China’s “nine-dash line” in the South China Sea, an official said on Thursday, amid growing anger among countries with overlapping claims in the waterway.

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Malaysia’s Film Censorship Board said on Thursday it has given the green light for the movie to be screened in cinemas without the scene depicting the map.

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“The animated film titled “Abominable”... has been given approval for screening in Malaysia under the condition that the controversial map is removed from the film,” the board’s chairman Mohamad Zamberi Abdul Aziz said in an emailed statement to Reuters.

The film will be released in Malaysian cinemas on Nov. 7.

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girder

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Re: "Abominable" and the 9-dashed-line
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2019, 02:01:49 PM »
Dreamworks' 'Abominable' pulled from movie theaters in Vietnam over South China Sea map

Quote
(CNN)— Vietnam's largest cinema chain has pulled a new Dreamworks animated movie from theaters because it features a map asserting Chinese ownership over the South China Sea.

"Abominable" is an animated film about a young Chinese girl who embarks on an elaborate trip across China to return a magical Yeti, named Everest, to the Himalayas. The movie is a joint collaboration between Dreamworks Animation and Shanghai-based Pearl Studios in China, and is voiced predominantly by actors of Asian ancestry.

In a scene close to the start of the movie, the main character, Yi, goes to her rooftop hideout in which she has spread out a map of China.

Clearly visible on the map is a U-shaped dotted line stretching from China's southern coast and encircling almost all of the South China Sea.

adroth

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Re: "Abominable" and the 9-dashed-line
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2019, 09:34:57 AM »
Hollywood Is Paying an ‘Abominable’ Price for China Access
A kid’s movie has turned into a geopolitical nightmare for DreamWorks.
BY BETHANY ALLEN-EBRAHIMIAN | OCTOBER 23, 2019, 11:16 AM

https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/10/23/abominable-china-dreamworks-propaganda-hollywood/

Hollywood’s China reckoning has come. But unlike the NBA’s recent China debacle, this time it’s not the United States but China’s nearest neighbors who’ve had enough.

Vietnam, the Philippines, and Malaysia have all expressed outrage at a map of China that flickers across the screen in a new film released in late September. The animated film, Abominable, is a joint production of DreamWorks and Pearl Studios, which is based in Shanghai. The map includes China’s infamous “nine-dash line”—the vague, ambiguously marked demarcation line for its territorial claim over most of the South China Sea.

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But the Chinese government’s heavy-handed film regulation department seems to have gone a bridge too far. One scene in the movie includes a map of China on the young female protagonist’s wall. Nine slim dashes trace a U-shape around the South China Sea, a resource-rich body of water with numerous land features also claimed by the Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam, Indonesia, Taiwan, and Brunei.

China is the only country that recognizes this unusual map. The nine-dash line has no basis in international law, which does not recognize any country’s sovereignty over open waters. In 2016, an international tribunal in the Hague also rejected many of China’s assertions of sovereignty over the South China Sea. Beijing has never clarified the line’s legal definition or even its precise location, likely because to do so would open its vague claims up to further legal challenge.

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« Last Edit: October 27, 2019, 10:09:10 AM by adroth »