Author Topic: F-35 Export  (Read 1587 times)

Ayoshi

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Re: F-35 Export
« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2017, 08:55:06 PM »
Israeli F-35s to be declared operational in December | IHS Jane's 360 - 22 June 2017
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The operational status will apply to the five F-35s already delivered to the IAF as well as all future jets on their arrival. Israel has ordered 50 jets to equip two full squadrons, with final deliveries expected in 2022.

Ayoshi

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Re: F-35 Export
« Reply #16 on: June 29, 2017, 10:19:58 PM »
Japanese MoD denies claims it is considering equipping F-35 with ASMs | IHS Jane's 360 - 29 June 2017
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The Tokyo-based Yomiuri Shimbun newspaper reported on 27 June that the air-launched Joint Strike Missile (JSM) being developed by Norwegian company Kongsberg "is a promising candidate" for the Japanese F-35As.

Responding to a question on the matter, Japanese defence minister Tomomi Inada said during a press conference on the same day, "Although the media report mentioned a study on the possibility of equipping the F-35 with an air-to-surface missile, we are not conducting such a study.

Ayoshi

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Re: F-35 Export
« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2017, 11:37:45 PM »
UK to decide on future F-35 variant 'at appropriate time' | IHS Jane's 360 - 13 July 2017
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Answering questions in Parliament, the Minister of State for Defence and Deputy Leader of the House of Lords, Earl Howe, said that while the UK had committed itself to its full quota of 138 aircraft, it had yet to decide on which variant these would be beyond the initial 48 F-35Bs that will be used to fly off the country's two new aircraft carriers.

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Of the three JSF variants – the conventional take-off and landing (CTOL) F-35A, the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) F-35B, and the carrier variant (CV) F-35C – the STOVL F-35B that the UK requires to operate off its 'ski-jump'-equipped Queen Elizabeth and Prince of Wales carriers, and the F-35C that the US Navy will fly from its catapult-equipped carriers, are the most expensive to procure by about USD10 million per aircraft.

Ayoshi

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Re: F-35 Export
« Reply #18 on: August 05, 2017, 02:35:39 AM »
Second Adir F-35I Squadron is on the horizon for Israeli Air Force | Air Recognition - 31 July 2017
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After seven months of integration and preparation for IOC (Initial Operational Capability), the second “Adir” F-35I Squadron is on the horizon as its establishment team is expected to begin working next summer

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Integrating this aircraft is extremely complex. It is a long maturation process and it is fundamentally different to the way we integrated other aircraft such as the ‘Sufa’ (F-16I) ‘Baz’ (F-15I) or the F-4 Phantom”, explained Lt. Col. Yotam. “In contrast to them, in this case we are integrating an aircraft that is still being developed. Earlier generation aircraft had software updates, but in the ‘Adir’, basic systems are updates as well as software. The F-35’s development process is completely different from any other aircraft’s”.


F-35I Adir. Israeli Air Force picture by Celia Garion

Ayoshi

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Re: F-35 Export
« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2017, 03:44:47 PM »
UK launches externally loaded F-35B from 'ski jump' for first time | IHS Jane's 360 - 13 August 2017
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The test, which took place in early August, saw a short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) F-35B loaded with a UK-specific mix of four Raytheon Paveway IV precision-guided munitions and two MBDA Advanced Short-Range Air-to-Air Missiles (ASRAAMs) take off from a launch ramp of the type that will be fitted to the United Kingdom’s two new Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers. As noted by BAE Systems in its Twitter announcement of the test, aircraft BF-02 was piloted by the company’s chief STOVL test pilot, Peter 'Wizzer' Wilson.

This test at Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River in Maryland is part of a wider campaign to validate for the F-35B the ‘ski-jump’ launch technique that was first developed by the United Kingdom to launch its Sea Harrier jets from the decks of through-deck cruise carriers in the late 1970s. This method enables the aircraft to take off with more fuel and/or weapons, and provides an extra safety margin compared with the US Marine Corps’ (USMC) system of launching from a flat deck. This is especially true during rough seas, when the ship will be pitching up and down.


An F-35B at the moment of launch from a 'ski-jump' test rig that has been set up at NAS Patuxent River. The aircraft is loaded out with a UK-specific mix of Paveway IV and ASRAAM weapons. Source: US Navy