Author Topic: Panavia Tornado multirole aircraft  (Read 147 times)

Ayoshi

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Panavia Tornado multirole aircraft
« on: February 08, 2019, 04:39:40 AM »
Tornado Multirole Aircraft | airforce-technology.com
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The Tornado multirole aircraft is operational in five different forms: Tornado GR 1 interdictor strike aircraft for close air support; counter air attack and defence suppression; GR 1A tactical reconnaissance aircraft; Tornado GR 1B long-range maritime attack aircraft and Tornado F3 long-range air defence fighter. The GR 4 is a mid-life update of the GR 1.

The Tornado entered service in 1980 and ceased production in 1998. The Tornado was manufactured by Panavia, a consortium of BAE Systems, EADS (formerly Daimler-Chrysler Aerospace) and Alenia Aeronautica.


https://www.baesystems.com/en/product/tornado-gr4

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Tornado has been a vital part of air forces from the day it went in to service in 1979; through a combination of upgrade packages and capability improvements Tornado is just as important today as it was then. The aircraft is currently in active service for the RAF in Iraq and Syria.

Built as part of a consortium between the UK, Germany and Italy the Tornado is a formidable aircraft that is renowned for its ability to operate in any weather conditions, at low level at any time of the day or night.
 
With a max speed of 1.3 Mach and an expansive range of integrated weaponry including Paveway IV, Tornado is still the frontline aircraft for our customers, more than 30 years after its entry in to service.
 
As well as being in service for the three partner nations who developed Tornado, it was exported to the Royal Saudi Air Force, and is still in use by them today.


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Photos taken from airforce-technology.com
« Last Edit: February 08, 2019, 05:13:20 AM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: Panavia Tornado multirole aircraft
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2019, 04:51:44 AM »
https://combataircraft.keypublishing.com/2018/01/25/last-year-of-the-tornado-gr4/

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Having entered front-line service with the Royal Air Force in 1982, the Tornado GR has assembled an unparalleled service record. It has been in constant combat action since 1991, and these very same aircraft still provide the backbone of the RAF’s precision-strike force.

You’d be hard pressed to find a combat jet in any air force around the world that has offered the kind of value for money that the Panavia Tornado GR4 has for the RAF. The very same airframes that entered service as GR1s way back in 1982 are still right at the leading edge of British air-power projection all these years later in Operation ‘Shader’ in the Middle East. They’ve been upgraded heavily, and many of the early jets have now been retired — reduced to parts to help resource and maintain the dwindling remaining fleet — but around 30 aircraft still remain in service in three front-line squadrons.

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The fact is that when the British government calls for precision strike, combat ISTAR (intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance), or that ‘day-one’ entry into contested airspace, the Tornado GR4 has remained the platform of choice. The balance is tipping towards the swing-role Typhoon, and ultimately the new capabilities that will enable the Typhoon to replace the Tornado — MBDA Storm Shadow and Brimstone weapons — will be fielded at the end of this year. Until then, the Tornado remains the only UK platform capable of carrying and surgically employing the MBDA Storm Shadow stand-off cruise missile and the similarly world-beating Dual-Mode Seeker (DMS) Brimstone.

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No one can argue with the combat pedigree of the Tornado GR4: from Operation ‘Granby’ (the 1990-91 Persian Gulf War), through the following years of Iraqi no-fly zones, Operations ‘Jural’ and ‘Desert Fox’, Operation ‘Allied Force’ over Kosovo, Operation ‘Telic’ in 2003 and the enduring Iraq mission, Operation ‘Herrick’ in Afghanistan, Operation ‘Ellamy’ over Libya, Operation ‘Shader’ over Syria and Iraq today, not to mention various other vital missions. The Tornado has earned an unequalled place in the RAF history books.


Brimstones, Paveway IVs, Litening targeting pod and RAPTOR recce pod — the GR4s can carry a diverse range of stores. Jamie Hunter

Ayoshi

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Re: Panavia Tornado multirole aircraft
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2019, 05:02:09 AM »
RAF Tornados fly last mission | Janes - 06 February 2019
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A pair of aircraft flew an armed overwatch mission, each equipped with three Paveway IV dual-mode bombs, Litening III laser designator pods and 2,250-litre 'Hindenburger' fuel tanks, together with Saab BOZ and Terma AIRCM (Advanced Infrared Countermeasures) chaff/flare/decoy pods.

No weapons were dropped on the sortie, and the last weapon released by a Tornado on Operation 'Shader' was dropped on 28 January. The last mission using the Reconnaissance Airborne Pod Tornado (RAPTOR) was flown on 27 January.

The eight RAF Tornado GR4s that had been deployed to RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus, for Operation 'Shader' then returned to RAF Marham on 4 and 5 February.


On 31 January, the RAF conducted its last operational sortie with the Tornado GR4 (pictured: the last of the two aircraft to take off, bringing an end to four and a half years of the type’s involvement in Operation ‘Shader’). Source: Crown Copyright

Ayoshi

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Re: Panavia Tornado multirole aircraft
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2019, 03:20:33 PM »
UK: final flypast of RAF Tornado before retirement | Air Recognition - 15 March 2019 10:43
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The RAF Tornado has completed its final flight in a flypast over the disbandment parade for the jet's last two squadrons. The Tornado will retire at the end of March after almost 40 years in service. Members of the last two squadrons to operate the aircraft attended the parade in a hangar at the jet's home base of RAF Marham in Norfolk.

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After taking off for the first time in 1979 the jets have been used all over the world — most recently bombing ISIS with missiles to push the terrorist group back through Syria and Iraq.

The legendary planes are due to be replaced by Typhoons after four decades of service.


The last Tornado GR4 performing a final flypast over RAF Marham (Picture source: RAF )