Author Topic: ROCAF F-16  (Read 6044 times)

Ayoshi

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ROCAF F-16
« on: January 28, 2019, 08:34:28 AM »
From: f-16.net

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Peace Fenghuang

In November 1992, representatives of Taiwan and the United States signed an agreement for the sale of 150 F-16A/B aircraft (120 A-models and 30 B-models) to Taiwan under the Peace Fenghuang Foreign Military Sales program. This large order (which coincided with an order for 60 Mirage 2000-5 aircraft, as well as a planned production run of 130 IDF (Indigenous Defensive Fighter) aircraft was meant to replace Taiwan's aging fleet of F-104 and F-5E aircraft. The air force inventory modernization program fits in a general military modernization program, spurred by China's move to upgrade its military hardware.

The F-16s are F-16 block 15OCU's built to MLU specifications (but designated F-16 Block 20 however). By the start of 1997, 5 aircraft had already been built and were formally handed over to Taiwan. Total cost of the deal is supposedly USD $6 billion.

< snipped >

Block 52 Order

In May 2006, Taiwan announced it was interested in purchasing an additional 66 F-16 aircraft. Taipei's first choice was to purchase the F-35 Joint Strike Fighters - which will come into service in the next few years - but the US has refused to offer Taiwan its newest fighters. Taiwan is buying the F-16 fighter jets to upgrade its aging air force fleet and counter what it perceives as a growing military threat from China.

On July 17th, 2006, the United States agreed to sell Taiwan 66 F-16 fighter jets in a deal worth over US $3 billion, the biggest arms deal the United States has offered Taiwan since 2001. In that year the US provided Taiwan with eight diesel-powered submarines, 12 P-3C submarine-hunting aircraft and PAC-3 Patriot missiles.

The new planes are aimed at replacing the ageing fleet of 60 Taiwanese F-5 aircraft who are serving for almost 30 years now. The deal is part of the Taiwanese Relations Act but is still a shift in US policy. Back in 1992, the US agreed to sell Taiwan 150 less sophisticated F-16A/Bs, but refused to provide F-16C/Ds which have a longer range and powerful ground attack capability.


ROCAF F-16A block 20 equipped with AIM-9 Sidewinder, AIM-7 Sparrow, plus Sharpshooter targeting and Pathfinder navigation pods [Photo by Johnstine]


Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2019, 08:46:08 AM »
Taiwan Gives Up On F-35, Turns to F-16V Option | nationalinterest.org

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The new proposal will push for the release of sixty-six F-16V Block 70 fighters, with an additional six aircraft to replace crashed F-16A/B Block 20s (seventy-two total aircraft).

This is, in part, a resurrection of an abandoned effort to procure sixty-six F-16C/D Block 50/52s killed by the Obama administration due to Chinese pressure. Beijing had dubbed the sale of new F-16s to Taiwan a “red line” and has repeatedly threatened to invade the self-ruled island.

The new campaign will also request co-production and performance-based logistics (PBL) as part of the overall package. PBL would improve combat effectiveness by 80 percent, say Taiwan defense industry sources.

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/taiwan-gives-f-35-turns-f-16v-option-37332

Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2019, 08:50:22 AM »
Taiwan gets first F-16 Viper, maintenance center planned | atimes - October 22, 2018 5:50 PM (UTC+8)
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The retrofitted fighters will have a helmet-mounted cue system, which can be linked to AIM-9X Sidewinder heat-seeking missiles and will enable pilots to actually see and shoot at targets.

The Taiwanese military is the first customer to get the F-16V after the self-governed island set aside NT$129.6 billion (US$4.2 billion) out of its tight defense budget to upgrade its existing 144 F-16A/B fighters to the latest configuration. The program will span five years until 2023, with 20 to 24 jets to be outfitted each year.

Taiwan bought its first F-16 in 1992 and the jets now make up the bulwark of the island’s air force against threats from the People’s Liberation Army on the opposite side of the Taiwan Strait.

The first F-16V received on Saturday underwent hardware and software upgrades in June, and was first spotted by aviation enthusiasts after it began flight tests in Texas at the end of August.

< snipped >

Regional maintenance base also planned

Meanwhile, Taiwan also hopes that the creation of an indigenous center for F-16s will make the island a base for F-16 maintenance in the Asia-Pacific, as air forces in Thailand, Indonesia, South Korea and Singapore have considerable fleets of the supersonic multirole aircraft.

A defense official revealed that Taiwan and Lockheed Martin had agreed to prioritize the development of an indigenous depot-level maintenance and repair center for F-16s. The aim would be to meet the F-16Vs’ maintenance needs, as opposed to shipping them back to the US for major repairs.

Taiwan in May began the initial evaluation for building an F-16 sustainment support center, with a total investment projected at US$500 million.

Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2019, 08:52:32 AM »
Taiwan Receives First F-16V Upgrade | ainonline - October 23, 2018, 5:06 AM
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The first four F-16A/B Block 20s began refurbishment at the state-owned Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation (AIDC) facility in Taichung in January 2017, and 6626 entered flight test in August this year, flown by Lockheed Martin test pilots. 

Under Project Rising Phoenix the island state is upgrading 144 F-16A/Bs with the Northrop Grumman AN/APG-83 active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, new mission computer, embedded inertial navigation system/global positioning system, and the Terma ALQ-213(V) electronic warfare management units. The upgraded jets will also be certified for the AIM-9X Sidewinder air-to-air missile, AGM-154 joint standoff weapons, and the AGM-88B anti-radiation missile.

Modifications will proceed at a rate of 20 to 23 aircraft annually and the program is expected to be completed by no later than 2023. The government also increased the budget for the program from NT$129.6 billion ($4.2 billion) to NT$140.2 billion ($4.5 billion) in September, factoring in the acquisition of new missiles and a ground proximity warning system.


The first F-16V fo Taiwan is seen on the runway at Chiayi. (photo: courtesy of Formosa Military Image Press)

Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2019, 08:54:35 AM »
https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3585155

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The U.S. is open to the possibility of licensing to Taiwan the intellectual property and production line expertise relative to F-16V production, posing an opportunity for Taiwanese industry development and employment, reports suggest.

< snipped >

The Taiwan Government is expected to request a quote for the 66 proposed F-16V fighters, with the U.S. expected to confirm price and availability in the middle of 2019. This would then lead to payments taking place through the Ministry of National Defence's budget for 2020.

According to international prices, the sale of 66 F-16V fighters would amount to around US$10 billion (NT$308.98 billion). The price would be greater if Taiwan was to manufacturer the jet in Taiwan, reported UDN.

In January 2017, the Taiwan Air Force began to upgrade its existing fleet of 145 F-16A/B fighters at a total cost of NT$110 billion (US$3.46 billion). The first of these upgraded fighters took to the skies in Oct. 2010, with the project expected to be completed before 2022.

Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2019, 05:11:34 AM »
Taiwan to purchase new American fighter jets | Air Recognition - 08 March 2019 16:49
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Taiwan's military is currently upgrading its 144 F-16 A/B jets to F-16Vs as part of a US$3.68 billion project launched by the government in 2016. The retrofit program includes installing advanced equipment such as the AN/APG active electronically scanning array radar system, which is in use on American F-22 and F-35 fighters.

The comprehensive upgrade of the Air Force's entire F-16 fleet is expected to be completed by the end of 2023, according to the MND.

https://www.shephardmedia.com/news/defence-notes/taiwan-asks-us-new-fighter-jets-defend-against-chi/
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Defence officials would not confirm how many fighter jets they have asked for in the purchase request, or what model. Local media Apple Daily reported Taiwan was seeking 66 F-16V at a cost of $13 billion including missiles, logistics and training.

‘It does not matter if it is F-15, F-18, F-16 or F-35, as long as it fits our combat needs,’ Tang Hung-an, a major-general with Taiwan's Air Force Command Headquarters said. Tang added that the letter of request to the US did not specify which type of aircraft Taiwan wants.   


Taiwan air force F-16 fighter jet (Picture source:  Voice of America/Public Domain)

Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2019, 12:26:15 AM »
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Are the US and China About to Face off Over American Fighter Sales to Taiwan? | The Diplomat - March 25, 2019

If that report is true, the United States would be turning course on what has been a longstanding reluctance to sell fighters to Taiwan, even as it has authorized other arms sales in line with the 1979 Taiwan Relations Act, which requires the U.S. government to support Taiwan “with arms of a defensive character.”

Even as the Obama administration and the Trump administration have approved weapons and spare parts for sale to Taiwan, fighters have long been seen as a bridge too far given Beijing serious reservations.

The United States authorized the sale of 150 F-16 fighters to Taiwan in 1992. The Obama administration, after receiving a request from Taipei, turned it down, initiating a set of upgrades instead to Taipei’s existing fleet.

< snipped >

The prospect of a fighter sale to Taiwan this time comes at a time of particularly heightened U.S.-China tensions. The Trump administration has been known to seek leverage with Beijing across issues and it is possible that this may turn into the latest case of Taiwan being used a possible bargaining chip as Trump seeks to clinch a favorable trade deal with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

Trump, however, has been unconventional on Taiwan policy in the past. As president-elect, he broke expectations by receiving a telephone call from Tsai. That call occurred at a time when Trump had yet to endorse the United States’ one-China policy as president — something that he did for the first time in February 2017.

Either way, Tsai’s fighter request and the Trump administration’s reported acceptance could set up another major area of turbulence between the United States and China.

https://thediplomat.com/2019/03/are-the-us-and-china-about-to-face-off-over-american-fighter-sales-to-taiwan/

Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2019, 12:56:10 PM »
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Why a US Sale of Fighter Jets to Taiwan Matters | The Diplomat - April 03, 2019

In the lead-up to the 1996 Taiwanese presidential elections, mainland China conducted a series of missile tests to express its displeasure against the pro-independence leanings of then-leader Lee Teng-hui and impress on the Taiwanese electorate that returning Lee to office might lead to war.

The United States’ response to the so-called Third Taiwan Strait Crisis, which was to order two aircraft carrier groups to the area, did the trick. The largest display of American military might since the Vietnam War forced a humiliating Chinese backdown and persuaded Beijing it needed to modernize its military to counter the U.S. Navy. The Chinese move also backfired as Lee’s popularity in Taiwan gained a shot in the arm for standing up to the mainland.

Back in 1996, China’s military budget was only about twice that of Taiwan’s and approximately 16 times smaller than that of the United States. Today, the People’s Liberation Army’s (PLA) budget is almost 22 times larger than Taiwan’s and over one-third that of the United States. China’s advanced short-range ballistic missile could destroy every runway attached to Taiwan’s six air force bases and destroy almost all Taiwanese fighter planes in the early moments of a war. The PLA has established superiority over Taiwan in the air, and on and under the water. The only thing the PLA cannot achieve is landing troops on Taiwan without suffering unacceptable losses.

< snipped >

Since the Taiwan Relations Act came into force, the United States has deliberately embarked on a policy of “strategic ambiguity” with respect to its military commitments to Taiwan in the event the latter is attacked. Whether the United States intervenes is a matter of political judgment and strategic assessment. Under the Barack Obama administration, the decision to only offer Taipei upgrades to its aging F-16 A/B planes suggested to Beijing that de-escalating tensions arising from differences over Taiwan was the predominant mindset.

In contrast, the Trump administration has shown unprecedented willingness to escalate tensions with China over political, strategic, and economic differences. The speech by Vice President Mike Pence last October at the Hudson Institute and the 2017 National Security Strategy pulled no punches in identifying China as a comprehensive rival to the United States. If the sale of F-16V planes goes through, then, it is evidence that the mindset in Washington with respect to Taiwan has also changed and is less accepting of mainland sensibilities and demands. Such a sale would be an indication that preserving de facto Taiwanese independence is once more considered critical to U.S. and allied strategy when it comes to keeping the PLA confined to inside the so-called First Island Chain.

That would be a significant blow to Chinese President Xi Jinping’s plans. In a wide-ranging speech on Taiwan in January to mark the 40th anniversary of the “Message to Compatriots in Taiwan” delivered to the 1978 National People’s Congress, Xi implied that “reunification” with Taiwan was a “historic task” he wanted to achieve during his tenure. A U.S. sale of F-16Vs to Taiwan — and all it implies — makes fulfillment of that task less likely.

Finally, the strength of American support for Taiwan will influence how other nations respond to persistent Chinese attempts to reduce international space within which Taiwan can act as a de facto sovereign entity.

https://thediplomat.com/2019/04/why-a-us-sale-of-fighter-jets-to-taiwan-matters/



Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2019, 03:15:51 AM »
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US Moves Ahead With $8 Billion F-16 Fighter Jets Sale to Taiwan | The Diplomat - August 16, 2019

The Trump administration has notified Congress on August 15 that it would submit the arms deal package for informal review, sources familiar with the sale told The Washington Post. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee and House Foreign Affairs Committee are expected to receive the submission of the arms sale to Taiwan for informal review from the U.S. Department of State by Friday evening, according to two sources. Congress is not expected to raise objections.

This latest move by the Trump administration comes amid accusations by U.S. lawmakers of both parties that the White House has delayed approving the $8 billion weapons sale to soften the ground for a future U.S.-China trade deal and use it as a bargaining chip during ongoing trade negotiations. Approval of the F-16 deal was reportedly deferred after trade advisers appealed to U.S. President Donald Trump. Trade negotiations between the two countries have currently reached a stalemate.

This July, the U.S. State Department approved the sale of 108 M1A2T Abrams tanks, along with a range of support equipment and arms including M88A2 HERCULES vehicles, and M1070A1 Heavy Equipment Transporters for an estimated $2 billion. It also approved the sale of 250 Block I -92F MANPAD Stinger missiles and four I-92F MANPAD Stinger Fly-to-Buy missiles.

https://thediplomat.com/2019/08/us-moves-ahead-with-8-billion-f-16-fighter-jets-sale-to-taiwan/


Ayoshi

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ROCAF F-16V
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2019, 04:07:34 AM »
https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/3764903

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Trump OK's F-16V fighter deal to Taiwan
2019/08/19 11:04

According to information provided by the White House press office, before leaving for New Jersey, Trump told the press that he had approved the arms sale and he indicated his confidence that the Senate would pass the weapons deal, reported CNA. Trump said that the deal is worth US$8 billion and that it will bring a lot of jobs to the U.S., indicating his confidence that Taiwan will use the F-16 "very responsibly," according to the report.

The sale of the F-16V fighters is the largest weapons deal between the U.S. and Taiwan in recent years. At a time when the U.S.-China trade war is at an impasse, and Trump has started to link the trade war with the Hong Kong protests, the sale of the fighter jets will surely irritate Beijing.

Many experts believe that the F-16V can carry and fire many newer short- and medium-range air-to-air missiles and will be more effective in countering the threat posed by China's 4th generation fighters such as the Su-35 and J-10. The warplane's manufacturer Lockheed Martin points out that the new F-16 has a number of avionics, weapons, and radar technologies that previous models did not have, and is designed to operate well into 2070 and beyond.

Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2019, 02:52:51 AM »
https://www.shephardmedia.com/news/defence-notes/us-approves-sale-66-f-16-fighters-taiwan/

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US approves sale of 66 F-16 fighters to Taiwan
21st August 2019 - 08:43 GMT

Taiwan will get the latest version of the Lockheed Martin-built fighter, the F-16C/D Block 70, in the $8 billion deal, the State Department said.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a statement that President Donald Trump had green-lighted the proposed sale after Congress was notified last week.

The F-16s ‘are deeply consistent with the arrangements, the historical relationship between the United States and China,’ Pompeo said. ‘Our actions are consistent with past US policy. We are simply following through on the commitments we've made to all of the parties.’

Taiwan's plan to upgrade its air defences comes amid increasing Chinese military incursions into its air space.

A spokesman for the Taiwanese president released a statement saying the jets would ‘substantially enhance our air defence capabilities to help Taiwan's self-defence and maintain the people's freedom and welfare.’

The sale's approval will have a key role in ‘peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait and region, especially in the wake of China's frequent military actions... in the region in recent years,’ the statement said.

Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2019, 05:03:23 AM »
https://www.janes.com/article/92049/rocaf-s-f-16-upgrade-programme-is-back-on-track-says-taiwanese-defence-minister

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RoCAF’s F-16 upgrade programme is ‘back on track’, says Taiwanese defence minister
21 October 2019

Speaking to reporters on 16 October, Yen admitted that the Phoenix Rising programme had suffered delays because of a shortage in manpower at the state-owned aviation company Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation (AIDC), but pointed out that an additional 200 employees have now been hired at AIDC's purpose-built F-16 upgrade facility in Taichung. As a result, the programme is expected to be completed as planned in 2022.

The programme, which was launched in 2016, is being carried out by Lockheed Martin and its local partner AIDC, with the first upgraded F-16V aircraft being delivered to the RoCAF in October 2018.

First unveiled at the Singapore Airshow in 2012, the F-16V features the Northrop Grumman AN/APG-83 Scalable Agile Beam Radar (SABR) active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar (derived from the F-16E/F Block 60 AN/APG-80), a new Raytheon mission computer, the Link 16 datalink, modern cockpit displays, an enhanced electronic warfare (EW) system, and a ground collision avoidance system.

The F-16Vs will be able to carry various weapon systems, including air-to-surface ordnance such as the AGM-154 Joint Stand-Off Weapon (JSOW) and the AGM-88 High-speed Anti-Radiation Missile (HARM). Among the air-to-air weapons that can be carried by the aircraft is the AIM-9X Sidewinder infrared-guided air-to-air missile (AAM), which can be aimed by the pilot using the Joint Helmet-Mounted Cueing System.

Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2020, 11:46:33 PM »
https://www.janes.com/article/93224/aidc-lockheed-martin-to-set-up-f-16-maintenance-facility-in-taiwan

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AIDC, Lockheed Martin to set up F-16 maintenance facility in Taiwan
16 December 2019

Taiwan's Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation (AIDC) has signed an agreement with Lockheed Martin to deepen collaboration on providing maintenance, repair, overhaul and upgrade (MRO&U) capability for F-16 Fighting Falcon multirole combat aircraft.

AIDC said that under the "strategic alliance", which was signed in Taichung City in Taiwan on 17 December, the two companies will establish an F-16 maintenance centre in Taiwan focused on supporting the Republic of China (RoC) Air Force's expanding F-16 fleets. AIDC is also expected to look to provide similar services to other F-16 operators in the Asia Pacific.

AIDC said the agreement, through which Lockheed Martin is expected to transfer supporting technologies to Taiwan as part of wider industrial co-operation obligations, is also aligned with the government's stated objective to ensure maintenance and support activity for frontline military equipment is carried out locally. The strategy is aimed at both ensuring military capability and boosting national industrial competencies.

Ayoshi

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Re: ROCAF F-16
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2020, 11:27:20 AM »
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Singapore Airshow 2020: Taiwan pioneers with its F-16V programme
5th February 2020 - 06:30 GMT

There are not too many operational differences between the F-16 Block 20 and F-16V, so a qualified pilot just needs to finished new combat training inside the cockpit. After familiarity with the new APG-83 AESA fire-control radar and weapon system, he will be verified as an F-16V pilot.

The training programme take place at Chiayi Air Base with the 4th Tactical Fighter Wing, and Luke Air Force Base in the US with the 21st Fighter Squadron. Pilots train on the APG-83 radar, new flight management system and digitised cockpit. Integrated with the Joint Helmet-Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS), Taiwan’s F-16Vs are able to fire AIM-9X Sidewinder air-to-air missiles.

Operational capabilities are enhanced through a Link 16 data link, Sniper targeting pod and Joint Direct Attack Munitions (JDAM). All this will elevate Taiwanese F-16s into the modern era, helping to compensate for the fact that Taiwan could not obtain F-35s from the US.

The F-16V retrofit programme is conducted by the Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation (AIDC) in Taichung. AIDC recruits retired ROCAF maintenance crews, and approximately 25-28 aircraft are expected to roll out every year.

In August 2019 the US approved an $8 billion arms sale to Taiwan for another 66 F-16C/D Block 70 fighters. This variant is equivalent to the F-16V configuration, but it has a more powerful General Electric F110 engine.

Delivery is expected to begin in 2023, and these F-16s will help build up the ROCAF’s 8th Tactical Fighter Wing on Taiwan’s east coast.

https://www.shephardmedia.com/news/air-warfare/singapore-airshow-2020-taiwan-pioneers-its-f-16v-p/