Author Topic: NewsX Exclusive: India completes 'nuclear triad' with INS Arihant  (Read 2355 times)

adroth

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NewsX Exclusive: India completes 'nuclear triad' with INS Arihant
By Ashish Singh
| Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - 17:24
First Published |
Monday, October 17, 2016 - 18:55

http://www.newsx.com/national/43962-newsx-exclusive-india-completes-nuclear-triad-with-ins-arihant
 
New Delhi: In an exclusive information accessed by NewsX, India in its mission to empower its navy has joined "Nuclear triad" club of superpowers who can launch nukes from air, land & water.

In February 2016, India's 1st indigenously built nuclear armed submarine INS Arihant was declared as ready for operations. In August 2016, Prime Minister Modi had quietly commissioned INS Arihant into the Indian Navy and since then it is fully-operational.

INS Arihant's commissioning into the Indian Navy has put India in a group of elite nations. India becomes the 6th country & joins the elite "nuclear triad" club. Earlier, only 5 countries in the world USA, UK, France, Russia and China have developed nuclear-armed submarines.

India has "No First Strike" policy, but Pakistan has a "First strike" policy meaning it is prepared to use nuclear weapons even if India doesn't.

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Ayoshi

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Re: NewsX Exclusive: India completes 'nuclear triad' with INS Arihant
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2017, 02:45:13 AM »
India Launched its Second Arihant-class SSBN Ballistic Missile Submarine Arighat | Navy Recognition - 19 December 2017
Quote
As reported by Indian English-language fortnightly news magazine and news television channel India Today, the second Arihant-class SSBN was launched in a very low key (some would say secret) ceremony on November 19, 2017 at the Ship Building Centre (SBC) in Visakhapatnam.

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The Advanced Technology Vessel (ATV) program calling for the construction of the first Indian nuclear submarines has been implemented since 1974 and is implemented with active Russian technical assistance. The boat is designed under the program with the lead role of the Indian State Organization for Defense Research and Development (DRDO) with the participation of the Indian Navy and the Indian Department of Nuclear Energy (DAE) with the Atomic Research Center in Mumbai (Bhabha Atomic Research Center - BARC). Larsen & Toubro (L & T, a supplier of steel), Walchandnagar Industries (the supplier of the reactor part and the main turbo unit) and Tata Power (the creator of the power plant and boat control systems) are involved as the largest contractors. The construction of ships under this program is carried out by SBC specially created for this purpose in Vishakhapatnam. A shore-based prototype of an 83-megawatt S-1 Indian nuclear reactor was developed on a highly enriched uranium fuel (40%), DAE was built in Kalpakkam and put into operation in September 2006.


Illustration of S 73 Arihant by Covert Shores
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The first picture of S 73 Arihant at the SBC shipyard. Picture via Covert Shores

adroth

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INS Arihant left crippled after ‘accident’ 10 months ago
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2018, 01:16:50 AM »
INS Arihant left crippled after ‘accident’ 10 months ago
Dinakar Peri Josy Joseph NEW DELHI ,  JANUARY 08, 2018 00:30 IST
UPDATED: JANUARY 08, 2018 13:49 IST

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/ins-arihant-left-crippled-after-accident-10-months-ago/article22392049.ece

Nuclear submarine was damaged after water entered its propulsion chamber

Indigenous nuclear submarine INS Arihant has suffered major damage due to ''human error'' and has not sailed now for more than 10 months, say sources in the Navy.

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Arihant’s propulsion compartment was damaged after water entered it, according to details available with The Hindu. A naval source said water rushed in as a hatch on the rear side was left open by mistake while it was at harbour.

The Ministry of Defence did not respond to questions from The Hindu.

The accident

Since the accident, the submarine, built under the Advanced Technology Vessel project (ATV), has been undergoing repairs and clean up, the sources said.

Besides other repair work, many pipes had to be cut open and replaced. “Cleaning up” is a laborious task in a nuclear submarine, the naval source said.

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After that, the submarine was towed to an enclosed pier for extensive harbour trials from the dry docks at Ship Building Centre, away from public view. Arihant was quietly commissioned into service in August 2016 and its induction is still not officially acknowledged. It is powered by an 83 MW pressurised light-water reactor with enriched uranium.

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Illustration of S 73 Arihant by Covert Shores

adroth

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Re: NewsX Exclusive: India completes 'nuclear triad' with INS Arihant
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2018, 06:56:01 PM »
India has 'nuclear triad' and submarine INS Arihant is 'warning to enemies', says PM Modi
The PM says it is a "fitting response to those who indulge in nuclear blackmail", an apparent reference to Pakistan and China.
16:36, UK,
Tuesday 06 November 2018

By Russell Hope, news reporter

https://news.sky.com/story/india-has-nuclear-triad-and-submarine-ins-arihant-is-warning-to-enemies-says-pm-modi-11546308

Indian prime minister Narendra Modi says the first successful voyage by its home-built nuclear submarine is a "warning for the country's enemies".

The INS Arihant recently completed a month-long "deterrence patrol", meaning India now has its long-desired 'nuclear triad', or the capability to fire nuclear weapons from land, air and sea.

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The INS Arihant, which was commissioned in 2016, is the first of five nuclear missile submarines India is planning to build.

The 110m (360ft) long 6,000-tonne vessel can carry 12 K-15 submarine-launched ballistic missiles with a range of over 434 miles (700km).

It can dive to 300m (984ft) and is powered with a 83 MW nuclear power reactor.

First launched in 2009, the INS Arihant's atomic reactor was activated four years later and has since undergone extensive sea trials before being inducted in the Indian Navy in 2016.

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adroth

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Re: NewsX Exclusive: India completes 'nuclear triad' with INS Arihant
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2018, 07:54:30 PM »
India’s long-awaited nuclear-armed submarine goes on its first patrol
More are under construction

Nov 17th 2018

https://www.economist.com/asia/2018/11/17/indias-long-awaited-nuclear-armed-submarine-goes-on-its-first-patrol

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The Arihant’s inaugural voyage was a triumphal step forward in India’s long, often tortuous quest to deploy atomic weapons at sea. Until now India has relied on aircraft armed with nuclear bombs, which might struggle to break through air defences, or land-based missiles, which are at risk of being spotted by gimlet-eyed satellites. Hiding missiles in the ocean solves these problems, giving India more confidence that its forces could survive a nuclear attack from China or Pakistan, and hit back.

But managing such weapons is not easy. One difficulty is ensuring that a submarine can receive orders without giving away its location. India has been building low-frequency radio stations, which use large antennas to propel signals underwater, for this purpose. Yet these are also vulnerable to attack, which is why some nuclear-armed states use airborne transmitters as well.

A second hitch is that the k-15 missiles aboard the Arihant can only fly a puny 750km, which means that the submarine would have to park itself dangerously close to China’s coastline to have a hope of striking big cities. Longer-range missiles, which could be fired from the safety of Indian waters, are in the works. But bigger missiles, and more of them, necessitate a bigger hull. That, in turn, requires that the nuclear-powered subs be fitted with bigger reactors—a fiendish technical challenge.

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