Author Topic: PHL Firearms Industry - from the backyard to the production line  (Read 189 times)

Ayoshi

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PHL Firearms Industry - from the backyard to the production line
« on: September 08, 2018, 01:28:51 PM »
The gunmakers of the Philippines | BBC - 20 March 2013
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A shot rings out from a factory on the outskirts of the Philippines' second-biggest city, Cebu.

But this isn't an all-too-frequent drive-by killing or an argument that has become violent.

The sound is from a testing range at Shooters Arms, the country's second-largest gun factory.

Shooters Arms produces about 20,000 pistols and shotguns every year, 85% of which are sold abroad - mainly to the US, Canada, Italy and Thailand.

< snipped >

His business has a lot of competitive advantages. He has low labour costs and a highly skilled workforce using a mix of specialised machines and painstaking manual precision to produce high-quality weapons.

He also has a lucrative local market. Filipinos love their guns - even the president is an enthusiast - and the national police say there are 1.2 million registered firearms in the country.

'Proper livelihood'

But Mr De Leon's factory has another positive factor going for it. In the controversial business of gun manufacturing, he can legitimately claim to be making the world safer rather than more dangerous.

Many of the people he employs are from the nearby city of Danao, which is well-known for its gunmaking skills, especially since World War II, when the people of Danao made guns for the resistance effort against the Japanese.

Part of the reason Mr De Leon set up his business near Danao was to tap the potential of these gunsmiths, who had been illegally making unregistered and unregulated firearms inside their homes for decades.

"When we established our business, we hired more than 60% of our employees from Danao. By employing these skilled workers, we provide them a proper livelihood by taking them away from doing illegal gun manufacturing," Mr De Leon said proudly.

But just because Mr De Leon has employed some of Danao's gunsmiths, it doesn't mean that the illegal trade has stopped.


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Ayoshi

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Re: PHL Firearms Industry - from the backyard to the production line
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2018, 01:31:56 PM »
PH gun industry: Small but ‘world-class’ | Rappler - Updated 12:23 AM, January 28, 2013

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The Philippines' gun industry feels the heat of a gun ban but remains confident that its reputation in the international market will keep it alive and well this year

https://www.rappler.com/business/20471-ph-gun-industry-small-but-&lsquo;world-class&rsquo;


Guns in PH. This photo taken on July 15, 2010 shows shop assistants arranging rifles for sale at a gun show in Manila. AFP Photo/Ted Aljibe




Ayoshi

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Re: PHL Firearms Industry - from the backyard to the production line
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2018, 01:33:18 PM »
Danao's ‘paltik’ gun-making industry continues to thrive | GMA news - September 8, 2018 1:10am
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Plea to Duterte

Winnie Banzon, a veteran gun designer who introduces himself as a "frustrated industrialist", had written to President Rodrigo Duterte and asked him to help the Danao's firearms industry.

The Presidential Management Staff had reportedly referred his request to the Department of Trade and Industry and the Department of Science and Technology.

In 1997, Banzon had advocated for the establishment of a gunsmith cooperative in Danao, but this did not get very far as gun manufacturing had remained  illegal.

The Danao local government was hoping to change this, and given President Duterte's roots in Danao (his father's family was from Danao and the current mayor was his cousin), they expected that he could make this happen.

Furthermore, according to Danao City Councillor Jojo Roble, legalizing the industry would bring in regulators, thus robbing criminals of a source of weapons.

"Magdo-domino effect eh. 'Pag tinumba mo 'yung illegal gun-making, matutumba rin 'yung bumibili, matutumba na lahat 'yun," Roble explained. — Margaret Claire Layug/DVM, GMA News
« Last Edit: September 08, 2018, 01:34:54 PM by Ayoshi »