Author Topic: Sukhoi Su-34 (Fullback)  (Read 192 times)

Ayoshi

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Sukhoi Su-34 (Fullback)
« on: November 04, 2017, 02:02:57 AM »
From: Military Today

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The Sukhoi Su-34 (NATO designation Fullback) was developed primarily for the strike/attack role to replace the Su-24 Fencer. It is a derivative of the Su-27 Flanker, easily distinguished by its side-by-side cockpit and 'platypus' nose.

   First flown in 1990, this aircraft was originally designated the Su-27IB. In 1995 a pre-production aircraft, designated as the Su-32, was revealed. Development was slow due to limited funding. Until 2004 a total of 8 pre-production aircraft were built for trials and evaluation. A couple of years ago Russian Air Force has adopted the Su-34 designation for this aircraft. The Su-34 officially entered service with the Russian Air Force in 2014. As of 2015 Russian Air Force operates 76 of these attack aircraft. It was stated that total Russia's requirement is for 200 interdictors of new type. The Su-34 is also proposed for export customers, however it received no orders to date. Upgrade programmes continue for surviving Russian Su-24s to extend their service lives.

   The Su-34 Fullback design retains the Su-27s basic layout, construction of the airframe, engines, most of its wing structure, tail and substantial part of onboard equipment. It also uses canards of the Su-30 for improved maneuverability. Aircraft has entirely new nose and forward fuselage with cockpit. The advantage of a side-by-side cockpit is that duplicate instruments are not required for each pilot. It is also more comfortable on longer missions. The Su-34 has a modern glass cockpit, with color multi-function displays. Nose section of the Fullback accommodates advanced multi-mode phased array radar, capable of terrain following. Cockpit and some other crucial components and systems are armored. Aircraft is fitted with comprehensive electronic counter measures equipment.


Photo taken from ausairpower.net
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Photo taken from thechive.com

see also: Flanker Export & News


Ayoshi

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Re: Sukhoi Su-34 (Fullback)
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2017, 02:07:31 AM »
From nationalinterest.org

The Su-34 Strike Fighter: Russia's Ultimate Weapon to Destroy ISIS? - September 29, 2015
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Russia has deployed at least four advanced Sukhoi Su-34 Fullback strike aircraft to Syria as it works to shore up the besieged regime of Bashar Al-Assad and to combat ISIS terrorist. Pentagon officials have confirmed the deployment according to reports.  The Fullback, which is a dedicated strike derivative of the Su-27 series, is the most advanced ground attack aircraft Russia has committed to its nascent Middle Eastern campaign. It is the jet’s first combat deployment outside Russia.

Originally conceived in during the last decade of Soviet rule, the Su-34 was designed primarily as a replacement for Russia’s increasingly decrepit fleet of Cold War-era Su-24 Fencer strike aircraft. Like the Fencer, the Fullback has side-by-side seating. Unlike the Fencer, the Su-34—taking full advantage of its Flanker lineage—is provisioned with a formidable air-to-air self-defense capability. In addition to short-range R-73 high off-boresight dogfighting missiles, the Su-34 carries the long-range radar-guided R-77 air-to-air missile. That means like its nearest Western equivalent, the Boeing F-15E Strike Eagle, the Fullback able to conduct “self-escorted” strike missions. It also has an unorthodox rearward facing radar to warn the crew about an threat approaching from behind.


While the Su-34 is capable of air-to-air combat in an emergency, the Fullback is a strike aircraft. The aircraft has a roughly 700 mile combat radius on internal fuel but is provisioned for aerial refueling with a probe and drogue system. Because the jet is expected to remain aloft for hours at a time, the Russians have uncharacteristically provided for crew comfort. The cabin has overhead space behind the ejection seats, which allows the pilots to stand up and even move around to an extent.

The core of the Fullback’s sensor suite is the Leninets B-004 passive electronically scanned array radar. The system uses the same basic phased array radar technology found on other Flanker variants, but is optimized for air-to-ground operations. It’s not clear what kind of capability the system offers, but it is thought be able to engage air-to-air targets at over 75 miles and air-to-surface targets at more than 60 miles. Like its Western counterparts, it is reasonable to assume its provides synthetic aperture radar mapping and ground moving target indication capability—but it not entirely clear that it does.


Does Russia Really Want to Replace the Su-25 Frogfoot with the Su-34 Fullback bomber? - November 2, 2017
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A senior Russian official is suggesting that Moscow should develop a single-seat derivative of the Sukhoi Su-34 Fullback bomber to replace the Sukhoi Su-25 Frogfoot close air support aircraft. However, it is unclear what benefit the Russian Air Force would derive from building such a machine.

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Nonetheless, the Russians will need to replace the Su-25 at some point—that is true. ”An attack aircraft will always be needed,” Bondarev said. “The Su-25 has been upgraded to the Su-25SM3 version. It has a very reliable airframe and huge modernization and repair potential. I believe it will fly for another 10-15 years. Naturally, we will have to replace it eventually and today various options are being considered.”

However, while the Flanker-series jets are fantastic and versatile warplane designs, the airframes are not ideal for the close air support role and probably should not be used to replace the Su-25. A source in the defense industry told apparently told TASS that the Russians are working on an experimental design for an attack aircraft based on the Su-34 bomber, which could start development in 2018. The project, as with many Russian Air Force lines of effort, seems to be completely redundant and would remove one of the Fullback’s key advantages—the presence of a dedicated weapons systems officer.

However, a supersonic attack aircraft design would make somewhat more sense than a replacement for the Su-25, though newer Flanker derivatives such as the Su-30SM and Su-35S have significant built-in strike capability already. But a Su-25 replacement should logically look more like a next-generation version of the Frogfoot or the U.S. Air Force’s A-10 Warthog, both of which are designed to fly at low altitudes and absorb serious punishment from ground fires. Certainly, a Flanker derivative is not suitable for that role.