Author Topic: USCG WPB 110 Island class patrol boat  (Read 213 times)

Ayoshi

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USCG WPB 110 Island class patrol boat
« on: April 03, 2018, 04:59:49 AM »
From: globalsecurity.org
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The United States Coast Guard acquired forty-nine 110' ISLAND Class patrol boats, of which forty-one remained in service as of early 2012, the others having been withdrawn from service following an unsucessful conversion to the WPB 123' configuration. The ISLAND Class' missions are to provide offshore surveillance, law enforcement, and perform search-and-rescue (SAR) operations. As such, the patrol boats were designed to have a 5-day endurance and a 3-ton payload margin. These boats replaced the Coast Guard's 95' and 82' patrol boats in this role. Originally, a construction contract for sixteen 110' boats was awarded in Fiscal Year 1984 (FY84) to the Marine Power and Equipment Company of Seattle, Washington. However, a United States District Court disallowed the award because of irregularities in the procurement process. As a result, Bollinger Shipyards in Lockport, Louisiana was awarded the contract for the 16 boats in August 1984.

In FY86, the U.S. Navy purchased an additional sixteen 110' patrol boats for the Coast Guard under the Department of Defense (DOD) Augmentation Appropriation. Next, the Coast Guard purchased five more patrol boats under the Anti-drug Abuse Act of 1986. All of the above mentioned procurements plus the final 12 boats were awarded to Bollinger Shipyards. The cost per patrol boat was approximately $7 million. The boats of the 110' ISLAND Class were commissioned between November 1985 and 1992.

At the time of contract award the design of the ISLAND class was approximately 20 years old. The design is based on an existing patrol boat developed by the British firm, Vosper Thornycroft (UK) Ltd. Such a route was chosen in order to minimize procurement costs and ensure the Coast Guard obtained a proven design. The ISLAND Class has a steel hull with aluminum deck and superstructure. In addition, they have a flush-deck with a round-bilge planing hull that is equipped with an active fin stabilization system.

However, after the first boats came into service it was discovered that the ISLAND class suffered from hull problems, most notably the development of cracks when operated in heavy seas. As a correctional measure, heavier bow plating was added to patrol boats WPB 1317 through WPB 1349. Other changes include an improved water purification system, and improved habitability and mooring fittings. Because of this and other modifications the patrol boats are grouped in A (WPB 1301-WPB 1316); B (WPB 1317-WPB 1337); and C (WPB 1338-WPB 1349) series.

The Island class has a round-bilge planning hull equipped with a active fin stabilization system. The hull was constructed in an inverted position to achieve better hull fairness. The steel hull and aluminium superstructure is bonded together using the Detacouple technique. The class is designed with a five day endurance.


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Photos taken from military.com
« Last Edit: April 03, 2018, 05:07:30 AM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: USCG WPB 110 Island class patrol boat
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2018, 05:04:24 AM »
Two former USCG Island Class cutters bought by Sea Shepherd | marinelog.com
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June 3, 2015 — Sea Shepherd Conservation Society has secured two new ships to join what it calls "its international eco-Navy."

Sea Shepherd uses direct action tactics to protect marine life, notably targeting the Japanese whaling fleet, sealing and shark finning, and its activities have often been characterized as extreme, bringing it criticism from other conservation groups.

This month Sea Shepherd USA revealed that in January it purchased two recently decommissioned U.S. Coast Guard 110-ft Island-class fast patrol vessels, the USCG Block Island and the USCG Pea Island. .

The two ships, now renamed the Jules Verne and the Farley Mowat, purchased in Baltimore, are now berthed in Key West, FL.

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US Coast Guard transfers two Island-class cutters to Costa Rica | Naval Today - October 17, 2017
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The transfer ceremony of the former cutters Long Island and Roanoke Island took place in Caldera, Costa Rica, on October 13.

Costa Rica is the third nation to receive the 110-foot patrol boats which are being gradually decommissioned by the US Coast Guard.

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Long Island and Roanoke Island are the fifth and sixth 110-foot patrol boats transferred to a foreign partner nation. The Coast Guard will provide new equipment to outfit the cutters, and technical and training services through the foreign military sales program before the Costa Rican Coast Guard sails the cutters from the Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay, Maryland, to reach Costa Rica in spring 2018.


US Coast Guard file photo of cutter Roanoke Island.

Ayoshi

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Re: USCG WPB 110 Island class patrol boat
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2018, 05:06:05 AM »
Ukraine to receive two former US Coast Guard Island-class cutters | Naval Today - April 3, 2018
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Ukraine will not be paying for the cutters, it was noted, and the only costs associated with the cutters would be transfer expenses and the subsequent training of Ukrainian maintenance crews.

It was not specified which vessels Ukraine would receive but it is likely that the cutters in question are ‘Cushing’ and ‘Nantucket’ which were decommissioned in March 2017 after 30 years of service.

Island-class cutters have been in service with the US Coast Guard since 1985 and are now being replaced Sentinel-class fast response cutters.

Ayoshi

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Re: USCG WPB 110 Island class patrol boat
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2018, 09:27:51 AM »
US vessels donated to Costa Rica depart Baltimore | Janes - 09 April 2018
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The two patrol boats, formerly known as Long Island and Roanoke Island , are 110 ft Island-class cutters that were constructed in the 1980s and were decommissioned by the US Coast Guard in 2015. The vessels will be renamed Libertador Juan Rafael Mora Porras (GC110-1) and General Jose Maria Cañas Escamilla (GC110-2) and will be used by Costa Rica’s coast guard (Servicio Nacional de Guardacostas: SNC).