Author Topic: CGC 2901 - 12,000 ton cutter  (Read 239 times)

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 8344
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
CGC 2901 - 12,000 ton cutter
« on: July 03, 2018, 02:56:40 AM »
From: http://cimsec.org/east-asian-security-age-chinese-mega-cutter/16974

< Edited >

Building the Mega-Cutter

During the 2010-2012 period, Chinese policymakers made a series of decisions to vastly expand the capabilities of the country’s maritime law enforcement agencies.  They envisioned a great fleet of ships charged with advancing Beijing’s claims to waters and islands hundreds of miles away from the mainland coast, performing what Chinese texts euphemistically refer to as “rights protection” operations.  In the last two years, the China Coast Guard has received dozens of new ships, many of which have been used to buttress new footholds at Scarborough Reef, the Second Thomas Shoal, the Luconia Breakers, and the Senkaku Islands, and underwrite economic activities in disputed waters, most notably the two-month drilling operations of HYSY 981 in 2014.  CCG 2901 is an outcome of this surge in shipbuilding.

That CCG 2901 would someday put to sea was not a secret. In July 2013, the head of China State Shipbuilding Corporation, Hu Wenming, declared that his company would “accelerate research and development” of maritime law enforcement cutters displacing between 4,000-10,000 metric tons.  In January 2014, the research affiliate of another state shipbuilding firm revealed that the previous year it had signed a contract to do design work for this new ship class.  By late 2014, Chinese netizens were posting photos of the ship in the latter stages of construction.

That CCG 2901 would be studded with deck guns was not a given. Indeed, it represents a noteworthy breach of precedent: almost all of the new ships procured by the China Coast Guard have been unarmed.  This allows Chinese ships to aggressively engage the state and private craft of other countries without conjuring images of gunboat diplomacy or precipitating a war. With CCG 2901, the deterrent value of deck guns trumps these old aversions.

When it is commissioned, 2901 will be based at one of three cities with direct access to the East China Sea. Most likely it will be stationed along Shanghai’s Huangpu River, a hub of Chinese coast guard activity.  It may eventually find a home at a large new base to be built further south in Wenzhou.  It will primarily conduct missions to areas China disputes with Japan, including the sovereign waters adjacent to the Senkaku Islands. However like other ships based in these ports it will no doubt periodically patrol the South China Sea, working with sister units in Guangxi, Guangdong, and Hainan to impose the Chinese legal order in disputed waters.

CCG 2901 is the first, but not the last, of its class.  A second ship is in the latter stages of construction at Jiangnan Shipyard.  It will almost certainly be based at a facility with easy access to the South China Sea, probably on the banks of the Pearl River in the city of Guangzhou (Guangdong).

< Edited >



=====



From: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeff_head/16116500945/in/photolist-pNgMFm-oRp2BV-pL77R1-pvNk65-oRp2NB-pMXPkZ-pR7JDt-pwZusS-pvKAKf-oRkYBU-qyahhx-pvLdea-pMXPrF-pvKAMj-pvLdnB-pL786u-pMXPyV-pvLdbp-qyaheX-pNcxLZ-B9KyrK-Ay62E8-B8xPCd-AvM8i9-AvM88u-B9KA28-B7s2gq-B7s1iy-t9BQFq-sShYsQ

Jeff Head Follow
2015-cstgrd-02
1st Chinese Coats Guard 12,000 ton Cutter, 2901, outfitting