Author Topic: Made in China 2025  (Read 1732 times)

Ayoshi

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Made in China 2025
« on: July 01, 2018, 10:12:50 PM »
Five things to know about 'Made in China 2025' | Asia Nikkei - April 04, 2018
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What is "Made in China 2025?"

It is an industrial policy blueprint Beijing approved in 2015 that lays out the country's plan to upgrade China's manufacturing base in 10 strategic sectors, such as robotics, semiconductors, aviation and new energy vehicles. The key goal is self-sufficiency. It has set specific targets, such as 70% self-sufficiency for core components and basic materials in industries like aerospace equipment and telecommunication equipment manufacturing.

A key aim is technological independence, thereby reducing room for U.S. interference, and making China less vulnerable to economic sanctions, explained Jianmin Jin, an economist at Fujitsu Research Institute.

"Chinese policymakers have diligently studied the German concept of 'Industry 4.0' which shows how advanced technologies like wireless sensors and robotics, when combined with the internet, can yield significant gains in productivity, efficiency and precision," said Lorand Laskai, research associate at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.

What is the U.S. concerned about?

The extent of U.S. concern is evident in a report released by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative on March 22. Although the report was aimed at revealing in detail China's unfair trade practices, it singled out one Chinese government initiative as a prime example of Beijing's egregious behavior: Made in China 2025, said Laskai. "Made in China 2025" is mentioned more than 100 times in this nearly 200-page report.

What China is trying to do, many experts said, is to take over as leader in industries such as robotics that are seen to drive economic growth in the 21st century. "These are things that if China dominates the world, it's bad for America," U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer told a Senate Committee on Finance late last month. In order to secure this position, Washington alleges, China is engaging in unfair practices such as forced technology transfer.

Ayoshi

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Re: Made in China 2025
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2018, 10:13:54 PM »
Made in China 2025 | CSIS - June 1, 2015

https://www.csis.org/analysis/made-china-2025

adroth

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Made in China 2025
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2019, 07:24:57 AM »
Made in China 2025, Explained

A deep dive into China’s techno-strategic ambitions for 2025 and beyond.
By Elsa B. Kania
February 01, 2019
 
https://thediplomat.com/2019/02/made-in-china-2025-explained/
 
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Made in China 2025 is but one key piece of a complex architecture of plans and policies aimed at generating “innovation-driven development,” an agenda that has emerged as a clear priority under Xi Jinping’s leadership.

In many respects, the launch of this initiative reflected a response to the weakness of Chinese manufacturing capabilities relative to global leaders, while also seeking to take advantage of a perceived opportunity to achieve a new source of growth. Increasingly, Made in China 2025 has come to be emblematic of these ambitions, rightly provoking intense U.S. anxieties over China’s emergence as a technological powerhouse that rivals American leadership. The core objective of advancing “indigenous innovation” to enable China’s “national rejuvenation” has been highly consistent across recent generations of Chinese Communist Party (CCP) leaders. In this regard, the technological dimension of China’s rise is integral to its future trajectory as a rising power with global ambitions.

At its core, Made in China 2025 has aimed to transform China into a “manufacturing superpower.” In particular, the plan highlighted 10 priority sectors, which include new-generation information technology; advanced numerical control machine tools and robotics; aerospace technology, including aircraft engines and airborne equipment; and biopharmaceuticals and high-performance medical equipment. At a time when China’s economy is slowing, the embrace of such emerging industries and technologies is seen as a critical means to sustain and upgrade growth. For instance, the pursuit of advances in intelligent manufacturing is seen as vital to ensure future competitiveness against the backdrop of a new industrial revolution.

These objectives are not unique to China. Made in China 2025 was inspired by a close study of Germany’s “Industry 4.0” initiative.

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« Last Edit: June 16, 2019, 07:30:43 AM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: Made in China 2025
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2019, 06:47:56 AM »
Made in China 2025: The Industrial Plan that China Doesn’t Want Anyone Talking About
MAY 7, 2019 / by EMILY CRAWFORD

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/made-in-china-2025-the-industrial-plan-that-china-doesnt-want-anyone-talking-about/

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Announced by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in 2015, MIC 2025 follows a long line of state-directed plans to channel government support and subsidies toward the development of Chinese companies. The 2025 plan, however, stood out for its ambition. It called for domestic companies to control not just Chinese markets, but also global ones. The plan’s focus on 10 key sectors, including robotics, artificial intelligence, and energy-efficient cars — all industries expected to drive the world economy in the coming decades — gained international attention.

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But to the Trump administration, this strategy was a prime of example of how China’s  development model promotes unfair competition and disadvantages U.S. businesses by subsidizing Chinese companies and limiting market access to foreign ones. The administration’s biggest MIC 2025 critics have argued that the plan’s ambitious targets motivate some of the more questionable behaviors U.S. officials have accused China of, including forced technology transfer and cyber theft. In March 2018, President Trump released a major investigation from the U.S. Trade Representative’s office highlighting MIC 2025’s role in what it called China’s “unreasonable” trade practices.

China took notice. Within weeks of Trump’s first tariff announcement in June 2018, the Chinese government started to downplay MIC 2025 and has avoided mentioning the plan since (which Trump held up as evidence that, thanks to him, China had abandoned the plan). Chinese media has been barred from reporting on it. And in March of this year, Keqiang did not mention MIC 2025 in his annual government work report for the first time since its announcement.

< Edited >

Spoken or otherwise, there seems to be consensus that the principles behind MIC 2025 are alive and well — China just isn’t using that name anymore.

Ayoshi

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Re: Made in China 2025
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2019, 02:31:00 AM »
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Made in China 2025, Explained | The Diplomat - February 01, 2019

At its core, Made in China 2025 has aimed to transform China into a “manufacturing superpower.” In particular, the plan highlighted 10 priority sectors, which include new-generation information technology; advanced numerical control machine tools and robotics; aerospace technology, including aircraft engines and airborne equipment; and biopharmaceuticals and high-performance medical equipment. At a time when China’s economy is slowing, the embrace of such emerging industries and technologies is seen as a critical means to sustain and upgrade growth. For instance, the pursuit of advances in intelligent manufacturing is seen as vital to ensure future competitiveness against the backdrop of a new industrial revolution.

These objectives are not unique to China. Made in China 2025 was inspired by a close study of Germany’s “Industry 4.0” initiative. In this regard, it is not the focus of this initiative, but the intentions reflected in its objectives and execution that are concerning. In a world in which technology and innovation have become highly globalized, China has sought “self-sufficiency” in core technologies across a range of prioritized industries. Implicitly and often quite explicitly, China’s objective to become a manufacturing superpower implies the ambition not merely to catch up with other advanced economies but to surpass and displace them to achieve a dominant position in these industries worldwide.

https://thediplomat.com/2019/02/made-in-china-2025-explained/

adroth

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Re: Made in China 2025
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2019, 04:03:08 PM »
The following commentary was shared by member of the forum's FB extension

https://www.facebook.com/groups/rpdefense/permalink/2273257376093430/

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***Credits to Michael Enright

Everybody is hawking "War" and saying a lot of things based on one sided ... and quite repetitive infographics or newsbites.

I dont believe China will initiate hostilities, but if pushed.. will.

I'd like to offer my 2 cents into this melting pot of ... ideas to offer a different perspective on the matter.l

I hope everyone here (both experts and nonexperts) have already read China's 12th and 13th 5-year plan? Which puts forward its principles and policies ranging from the economy, bri, envi, taiwan, hongkong, macau, international relations.

I have a short summary of the 12 year plan 2011-2015 then a link to 13th 2016 to 2020.

A quick perusal of both plans place signifocant importance on Stability and Quality of Life. Not for the neighbors but for Their Citizens.

The CCP and their People's Social "contract" exchanges freedom and obedience in exchange for prosperity and stability. Hence because of the boom of the 1990s to the Present the social.contract between people and state has been largely upheld.. they did not have to resort to "black mirror" type social controls on the past. China was minting millionaires by the hour, people were happy and everyone followed. Stability was ... is the key to China's continued progress. It was winning.

As of late the cost of this rapid growth is rearing its ugly head in the horizon. First a possible credit implosion, second a slowdown complicated by manufacturing slack, and lastly the environmental cost of such an extended and quick ascent.

To attempt to correct this, They proceeded to direct firms to produce for the domestic market. Blacklisted/Crackeddown on Shadow Banking institutions even initiating in an amnesty scheme. They also made it a performance metric for governors to improve environmental controls and improve quality of life.

While China is busy with those 3, The 12th and 13th 5-year plan resulted in good news and the worst of news. China is set to organically move up around 250,000,000 (250M citizens) from "poor" to "well off" by 2025... at the same time.the Party realizes that there is no amount of concrete, cottom, leather, or steel inside Chima to sustain these people. There really isnt, imagine prsctically opening up an entire country of middle class citizens, where do you get the materials for all of them?

Hence, thats where the concept for the BRI comes from. To secure resources at any cost to maintain stability at home.

Then China still has to sustain access to the Pacific. Its 13th 5 year plan basically states that the way to deal with HK, Taiwan and Macau is to closely integrate them with their economy. (Of course this should be read in conjunctiom with 13th year plan Part CIX, Chapter 78 integration of Mil and Civ Econ).

Nowhere in their 5 year plan does it state that their Policy is one of Military Offensive action. Rather its more of Economic Offensive, tying up both countries economies so that if conflict does erupt it will hurt Both. Even with taiwan their position is "firmly".

Im not discussing the Military Doctrines in this as i leave it to our personnel who are specializing there.

So in all its actions and official policies and documents, Stability has been the Anchor. So why fire the first shot? Why declare war, and give your enemies the chance to coral you and easily block your access to resources for your people. Feeding and providing for over 1.2 Billion people is a logistical nightmare. Imagine blocking off resources, and you have 250million well off, educated chinese angry they cant get their wife a louis vuotton bag, that all their hard earned wealth is unenjoyable. How long do you think the CCP will last?

The only extreme scenario i believe is when there is an imminent danger their shipping lanes will be blockaded then you will see war. Even then there might be some.backdoor dealings to still stave off war.

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