Author Topic: The Pivot to Asia  (Read 439 times)

adroth

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The Pivot to Asia
« on: May 29, 2018, 03:40:45 PM »
The Legacy of Obama’s “Pivot” to Asia
The president's Asia legacy is not worst in recent history. But it's not the best either.

http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/09/03/the-legacy-of-obamas-pivot-to-asia/

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n the management of great power relations in North Asia, the administration has delivered a sub-par performance. The George W. Bush administration handed off strong and generally trusting relationships with all the major powers — China, India, and Japan. Obama will be handing his successor a very tense relationship with Beijing and continuing uncertainty in the Japanese government about U.S. reliability, despite some important developments on security cooperation with Tokyo and a very successful presidential visit to Hiroshima this spring. Exogenous factors contributed heavily to the current problems with China to be sure: The 2008 financial crisis looked to Beijing like the beginning of secular American decline and Chinese President Xi Jinping turned out to be a far tougher counterpart than the mild-mannered Hu Jintao was. But the administration compounded these problems by failing to articulate its bottom line in Asia. In 2009, the president emphasized his intention to respect China’s “core interests” in Asia, to the alarm of American allies. Then, in 2011, after an emboldened China began throwing its weight around, the administration announced its “rebalance” to Asia with new military deployments to Australia, to the alarm of China. Then, in 2013, the administration shook American allies again by walking away from the “red line” on Syria and announcing support for Xi Jinping’s “New Model of Great Power Relations” — a proposed condominium of the United States and China in Asia that looked very much like the earlier pledge to respect China’s core interests.

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