Author Topic: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link  (Read 8806 times)

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 11934
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« on: April 10, 2018, 08:37:38 AM »
Administrator's note: See also Frigate Acquisition Project thread index for this, and other, sub-systems

=====


PN requirements as per SBB# PN-FAP-16-01






======



How this specification became controversial

CMS to be acquired for frigates compliant to Navy specifications
By Priam Nepomuceno  February 19, 2018, 7:46 pm

http://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1025747

MANILA -- Department of National Defense (DND) Secretary Delfin Lorenzana on Monday assured the public that the combat management system (CMS), being acquired for the two frigates contracted by Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI), is compliant to all the specifications set by the Navy.

"No, we are not settling for a less capable system, compliant system (Hanwha CMS), yan ang (that is the) term sa (in) procurement," Lorenzana noted.

Lorenzana made this statement shortly after Monday's Senate hearing where the Navy's Frigate Acquisition Project (FAP) was tackled and the reasons why HHI opted to pick Hanwha over Thales Tacticos, the manufacturer preferred by former PN flag-officer-in-command Vice Admiral Ronald Joseph Mercado.

And while acknowledging that Thales Tacticos is a good CMS brand, the DND chief said the Hanwha CMS being selected to fit the Navy's first two missile-firing capable frigates is equally capable.

"We are not buying a lesser product. We are buying an equally capable product to be put into our ship(s)," he added.

Also, Lorenzana emphasized that Mercado's relief last December was brought about by the latter's refusal to comply with two of his memorandums on the CMS and pronouncements that he will have the project cancelled if Thales Tacticos was not selected to supply the above-mentioned equipment.

"(The reason for his relief as FOIC was) dahil dalawang beses na memo ko hindi n’ya sinusunod tapos, sa mga conference niya (sinasabi) na pag hindi (na)tuloy ang (Thales) Tacticos, ika-cancel niya ang FAP (The reason for his relief as FOIC was he disobeyed my memos twice and he says in his conferences that he will have the FAP cancelled if Thales Tacticos will not be selected)," the DND chief pointed out.

Also, Lorenzana said that it was Mercado who had the specification "Tactical Data Link 16" or the ability to transmit and receive data from various platforms in a bid to justify the preference for the Thales Tacticos CMS.

"Hindi ko alam may motivation siningit nila nung tapos na technical specifications nung Link 16, baka (para) ma-disqualify ang Hanhwa (I didn't know there was this motivation that they have inserted when the technical specifications of Link 16 were done. Maybe, it's for Hanhwa's disqualification)," he added.

< Edited >
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 01:27:03 PM by adroth »

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 11934
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2018, 09:03:24 AM »
About Link16


=====

https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/monograph_reports/MR1235/MR1235.chap9.pdf

TADIL J, JTIDS, AND LINK 16

Several communications systems have been developed over many years to support TADIL communications, or the near-real-time exchange of data among tactical data systems. Each such system is specified by hardware/software characteristics (e.g., waveform, modulation, data rates, transmission media, etc.) as well as by message and protocol standards. The most recent system is the JTIDS/TADIL J system, which is commonly referred to as Link 16 in the United States. Link 16 is an encrypted, jam-resistant, nodeless tactical digital data link network established by JTIDS-compatible communication terminals that transmit and receive data messages in the TADIL J message catalog.

Link 16 data communications standards and technology were developed in the U.S. JTIDS program, which began in 1975. The first JTIDS terminals or Class 1 terminals were large and were installed only on AWACS and at U.S., U.K., and NATO ground-control facilities. Smaller JTIDS terminals (Class 2) were also developed. However,
because of their high cost, large size, and reliability issues, only a limited number of such terminals were procured to equip U.S. fighters specifically—U.S. Navy F-14Ds and a single squadron of U.S. Air Force F-15Cs.

The MIDS program was created to put small, lightweight Link 16 terminals on U.S. and participating allies’ fighter aircraft. MIDS is a major international program led by the United States, specifically the U.S. Navy, and has a Navy captain as its program manager. By international agreement, the deputy program manager MIDS is a French military officer.3 The countries funding the development of MIDS are the United States, France, Germany, Italy, and Spain.

Link 16 can provide a range of combat information in near-real time to U.S. and NATO allies’ combat aircraft and C2 centers. The displayed information includes an integrated air picture with both friendly and hostile aircraft locations, general situational awareness data, and amplifying data on air and ground targets, including air
defense threats. This will contribute to the integrated control of fighters by either ground-based or airborne controllers and will greatly increase the fighters’ situational awareness and ability either to engage targets designated by controllers or to avoid threats, thereby increasing mission effectiveness and reducing fratricide and attrition. An in-depth description of the U.S. Air Force concept of Link 16 employment (COLE) for counterair, interdiction, SEAD, and

< Graphic >

CAS missions can be found in the COLE document prepared by the Link 16 System Integration Office.4 This document describes the information that will be exchanged, how it will be used to support each mission, and the data link architecture that will be employed. Table 9.1 provides a representative list of the various Link 16 terminals
and the platforms (both U.S. and NATO allies) on which they are currently installed or planned for the near future (2010). In principle, if any of these platforms are within line of sight, they could establish tactical communications using Link 16.

LINK 16 TERMINOLOGY

Because Link 16 terminology is not standardized within the United States or within NATO, we list here the specific standards to clearly indicate how we are using the terms in this report. We also compare U.S. and NATO definitions and standards. As discussed above, Link 16 uses JTIDS-compatible communication terminals that transmit and receive data messages in the TADIL J message catalog. Specifically, the terminal interface standards (hardware/software) are presented in the JTIDS System Segment
Specification (SSS) (DCB79S4000C), and the procedural interface standards (message formats and protocols) are presented in the TADIL J Message Standard (MIL-STD-6016). These definitions and standards can be illustrated by examining the process for information exchange for a particular mission. Figure 9.2 illustrates this process for the counterair mission. The AWACS surveillance sensor detects a threat. An AWACS crew member prepares the information that will be sent to the F-15C using the situation
display console (SDC). The flight processor takes the information and formats it into TADIL J messages. The JTIDS Class 2H terminal encrypts the messages and transmits them to the JTIDS network.

The F-15C’s JTIDS Class 2 terminal receives the messages, decrypts them, and filters out nonrelevant messages. The flight processor then extracts the content from the messages and displays the information on the F-15C’s multipurpose color display (MPCD). The JTIDS-compliant radio equipment and the TADIL J message formats and protocols are clearly illustrated. The definition of Link 16 provided above includes just these two components. A broader definition of Link 16 is depicted in Figure 9.2. This systemof-systems concept includes the systems used by the aircrews to perform the functions to move the information from one aircrew to another. Although this broader definition is not used in this report, it clearly depicts the aircrews’ role in Link 16 and the need for interoperability at the aircrew level. Within the United States, confusion arises when JTIDS and Link 16 are used interchangeably for the data link. JTIDS and JTIDScompliant radio equipment (such as MIDS) are just the communications
element. There is also confusion surrounding the use of TADIL J. Some want the term to apply to the link, and others want the term to apply only to the message formats and protocols (as defined by MIL-STD-6016). In this report, we use TADIL J only for the message formats and protocols. NATO has a different view of this terminology. The TADIL J messages and protocols become “Link 16” (STANAG 5516), while the JTIDS communication element becomes “MIDS” (STANAG 4175).

Thus, NATO uses Link 16 in a narrower sense than that used in the United States. There are also differences in standard operating procedures: The United States uses the Joint Multi-TADIL Operating Procedures (JMTOP) (Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Manual CJCSM 6120.01), and NATO uses Allied Data Publication-16 (ADAP-16). JMTOP has been recommended to NATO for adoption.

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 11934
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2018, 10:05:33 AM »
Asian interfaces to the system

Seoul to set up intelligence data link that connects it to Japan-U.S. system
STAFF REPORT

JAN 22, 2016

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/01/22/asia-pacific/seoul-set-intelligence-data-link-connects-japan-u-s-system/#.WmJa_66nGpo

South Korea will set up a military data link to share imagery and real-time intelligence with Japan and the United States, a Korean news agency quoted the nation’s Defense Ministry as saying Friday.

Yonhap news agency said the South Korean military data network will hook into that operated by United States troops, based in Osan, with a so-called Link 16 connection — a tactical data exchange system used by the U.S. and NATO nations.

This gives Seoul an intelligence link to Tokyo, as the Self-Defense Forces already operate a Link 16 connection to the U.S. network, Yonhap said.

< Edited >

Work on a broad bilateral deal to share intelligence fell apart in June 2012 shortly before it was due to be approved, at a time of rapid deterioration in Tokyo-Seoul relations. In December 2014, an agreement with Washington pledged greater trilateral sharing of intelligence on North Korea.

< Edited >

====

South Korea’s Military Plans To Set Up Network To Share Information On North Korea’s Missiles
BY VISHAKHA SONAWANE

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/01/22/asia-pacific/seoul-set-intelligence-data-link-connects-japan-u-s-system/#.WmJa_66nGpo

< Edited >

South Korea plans to use Link 16, a military tactical data exchange network used by the U.S. NATO and other countries, to share text and images of North Korea’s nuclear and missile activities on real-time basis, Yonhap News Agency reported, citing the ministry’s 2016 policy plan. The Link 16’s interface control will be connected to that of the United States Forces Korea in Osan Air Base, 39 miles south of Seoul, and will allow South Korea to access U.S. information collected from its Defense Support Program over the Korean Peninsula.

"Despite the U.S.-Japan linkage, information sharing will not take place without the agreement from each side and, even if it takes place, it will be confined to subjects on North Korea's nuclear weapons and missiles," a defense official said, according to Yonhap.

< Edited >

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 11934
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2019, 07:01:14 AM »
https://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/the-wonders-of-link-16-for-less-midslvts-updated-02471/?fbclid=IwAR0-XMlaBpJCo2XO9kA_euMzy8sC9Q3Utzhx_S74kuSuQuhajYeDqhOgWOM

What one sees, all see. Jam-resistant Link-16 radios automatically exchange battlefield information – particularly locations of friendly and enemy aircraft, ships and ground forces – among themselves in a long-range, line-of-sight network. For example, air surveillance tracking data from an Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft can be instantly shared with fighter aircraft and air defense units. More than a dozen countries have installed Link 16 terminals on over 19 different land, sea, and air platforms, making it an interoperability success story.

< Edited >

As Rockwell Collins notes: external link

“Link 16 provides real-time, jam-resistant secure transfer of combat data, voice and relative navigation information between widely dispersed battle elements. Participants gain situational awareness by exchanging digital data over a common communication link that is continuously and automatically updated in real time, reducing the chance of fratricide, duplicate assignments or missed targets. Each participant in the communication link is able to electronically see the battle space, including assigned targets or threats. The DLS MIDS LVT represents the latest generation of Link 16 equipment incorporating secure data and voice into a single, small, affordable and highly reliable unit.”

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 11934
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
« Last Edit: January 09, 2019, 08:10:04 AM by adroth »

hotandwild

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 21
    • View Profile
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2019, 12:01:47 AM »
Well said.

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 11934
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2019, 07:01:27 AM »
Interesting reply to the Korean FB post. C/o of a long-time Timawa who knows his way around system integration

Quote
Link-P data link network based on the Korean Link network is expected to be compatible with US link 16 by 2019…

2)…….gives the US a political reason not to allow integration of Link –P with Link 16, there shouldn’t be any issue…

No indication that PN frigs will have issue interfacing with Link-16…


The post actually gave me more concern than reassurance. So, does the first sentence imply that the link-P does not functionally exist? What does exist? Proof of concept? Prototype?

On the second and third, how can such reassurance be given if a working, 100% functional link-p does not exist?

The logic that SK and US are close ally which need to talk to work together does not automatically mean that link-p will work. Much of the comments are based on SK needs, not PN requirements. And how can that be logical when, again, an up and up link-p does not seem to exist?

I am not for or against any party in this but if given the same statements (in isolation) and in an acquisition environment, these are red flags to me. considering the delivery timeline, I hope this will not be a case of “doing proof testing in an operational environment” when the boats are handed over….

how about the GRP making an official request to the DoD for a formal program review by NAVSEA/NAVWEPS or DCMA or what ever competent agency there is?


« Last Edit: March 10, 2019, 12:19:46 PM by adroth »


adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 11934
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2019, 02:04:10 AM »
LOOK: Inside the CMS test site for Philippine Navy frigates
By: Frances Mangosing - Reporter / @FMangosingINQ INQUIRER.net / 08:05 PM May 25, 2019

GUMI, South Korea — Hanwha Systems, the chosen supplier of the combat management systems (CMS) for the Philippine Navy’s upcoming frigates, opened up its facilities to Philippine media recently.

< Edited >

Manila-based reporters were given a chance to have a quick look at the integrated combat management systems’ test site for BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151), the second missile-capable frigate which formally started its construction this week.

The selection of the CMS for the first purposely-built missile-capable frigates of the Philippine Navy attracted public attention last year.

< Edited >

Tacticos Thales is compatible with Tactical Data Link 16, a military data exchange network used by the navies of NATO, the United States, and other countries. Hanwha System’s Naval Shield compatibility with TDL 16 is still being developed.

Shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries insisted on choosing the CMS for the Philippine ships, citing a part of the contract. While it first offered Tacticos Thales to the Philippine Navy, it later switched to Naval Shield of Hanwha System.

< Edited >

Hanwha Systems senior manager of overseas business support team Sam Soo Kim told reporters on Wednesday that their standard comprehensive testing for TDL 16 with the US had been delayed to late 2020 due to change of requirements in transmission by the Korean armed forces.

According to Kim, it’s the US that conducts the final and official tests for the certification of TDL 16 compatibility.

But he said they had developed an exclusive tactical data link system called “Link P” for the two frigates of the Philippine Navy being built by HHI.

This can communicate with other similar tactical data link systems and has a 32-digit key code encryption to ensure data security.

“There is 32 digit key code for encrypting (‘Link P’) and we will give this freedom (to the PN) to change the key code. Normally the password has 10 digits. Hacking of this password takes millions of years. That’s the theory. Thirty-two digits is a very long password. Philippine Navy can randomly put in this system,” Kim said.

Empedrad said the TDL 16 compatibility for the Philippine frigates would require a different procurement activity for the government.

“TDL is not part of the contract. Wala naman nakalagay. It is provided with space but not (supplied) with. Pag binili yun, pwede agad isalpak,” he said
.

< Edited >


Read more: https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1123230/look-inside-the-cms-test-site-for-philippine-navy-frigates#ixzz5oxal9P3M
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 11934
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2019, 06:34:35 AM »
Important information that folks have been missing

RADM Cejoco implies it was well written specs:



The PAF's FA-50s are already linked with Link16. Here's how.

"Hanwha still has to develop a Link-16 system..."

Dead giveaway that even the good admiral has been misinformed about TADIL(now just TDL) Link-16. The Koreans need not develop a Link-16 hardware component because it isn't there's to develop, they are not allowed to. Link-16 networks are controlled entirely by the US-based MIDS International Program Office, an office in the Pentagon controlled by the USN and a French officer typically, well... them and the original partner NATO countries.

The program office controls ALL work. Literally ALL WORK.

For example: When the PAF wanted to interface with Link-16, they asked for permission from the office and sent them a requirement for MIDS LVT hardware to be installed into the FA-50s. The IPO worked the request, and got approval from the partner nations on our behalf. They then drafted our requirements into an RFI and got quotes, then picked a contractor for us. The work is stamped a form of high-security FMS, with very specific conditions and restrictions.

The program office chosen contractor then flew to Korea to install the datalink kit into our FA-50s, with some assistance from DAPA and KAI.

Literally at no point in the decision making or hardware process were the Koreans or the Philippines ever involved. None. We were just there to receive the airplanes with the radios and terminals already installed. This is what I've been trying to get everyone to understand.

Naval Shield DOES NOT MATTER, because the Koreans do not have direct access to the TDL hardware... like Canada, Australia, Japan, UAE, Saudi Arabia... the list goes on of richer, more technologically capable countries who are simply at the mercy of the Program Office.

« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 06:45:28 AM by adroth »

adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 11934
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2020, 04:53:54 PM »
https://www.theguru.co.kr/news/article.html?no=9415

Via Google Translate. Errors to be expected.

< Edited >

According to related industries and Philippine media Inquire on the 17th, Navy General Giovanni Carlo Barcordo said on the 10th (local time), "The introduction of the frigate is ongoing without delay." .
 
The certification process that the Philippine Navy is waiting for is whether the CMS of Hanwha Systems mounted on the Philippine Export Escort is compatible with the US Tactical Data Link (LINK16).

The certification process that the Philippine Navy is waiting for is whether the CMS of Hanwha Systems mounted on the Philippine Export Escort is compatible with the US Tactical Data Link (LINK16).

In the beginning, even though Hanwha Systems proposed to the Philippines to test with ADSI, a Link-16 simulator, to verify compatibility, the Philippines side requested verification of ADSI reliability.
 
Hanwha Systems proved its authenticity by providing an official letter from the United States' original ADSI manufacturer to the Philippines, but the Philippine authorities said that the letter of the company was not sufficient and that they had to go through the certification process by asking for US government documents. 
 
From the standpoint of Hanwha Systems, the Philippine authorities are embarrassed by the establishment of a flagship with ADSI certification while the delivery schedule is being completed without any delays, such as the successful completion of a frigate trap equipped with its CMS.

< Edited >

LionFlyer

  • Timawan
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 267
    • View Profile
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2020, 07:00:52 PM »
Interestingly enough, South Korea has a Korean Joint Interoperability Technology Center (K-JITC), which is affiliated to the US JTIC.

Quote
JITC HOSTS KOREAN JOINT IOP TECHNOLOGY CENTER DIRECTOR
By Robin S. Murray

FORT HUACHUCA, Ariz. – Mr. Heon Dong Lee, director, Korean Joint Interoperability Technology Center (K-JITC), visited the Joint Interoperability Test Command the first week of December 2015 to further collaboration efforts between the Republic of Korea (ROK) and the United States that will improve the ROK's interoperability test capabilities.

The ROK has initiated a Foreign Military Sales (FMS) Case with the United States which requests JITC’s assistance in helping the ROK to develop an independent capability to conduct Link 16 standards conformance tests at the K-JITC. Lee was joined by LtCol Min Hwang, chief, K-JITC Evaluation Team; 1LT Seongeun Lee, interpreter; and Sunghoon Eom, Joint United States Military Assistance Group-Korea.

During Lee’s visit a wide range of topics were discussed, to include: an overview of the Tactical Systems Division, demographics of the current JITC Tactical Data Link (TDL) workforce, JITC TDL facilities and capabilities, Service TDL testing organizations that JITC works with, an overview of the JITC TDL Test Director training program, the JITC TDL Standards Conformance Testing methodology, recent ROK TDL test results, a TDL lab demonstration, a review of the status of the Letter of Offer and Acceptance, and an office call with Captain Eric Johnson, commander, JITC. In addition to the technical discussions a no-host dinner was held on the evening of 30 November.

Under the terms of the FMS case, JITC will send two personnel to Korea for a period of six months to help K-JITC conduct a Link 16 standards conformance test on a ROK system. During the six-month test cycle JITC will also provide training and documentation to the K-JITC so they are prepared to independently conduct Link 16 standards conformance testing for Korean systems at the end of the test cycle.

In addition to the K-JITC FMS Case, JITC also has two other pending FMS Cases with the ROK to provide TDL standards conformance testing for the indigenous ROK Link K data link system and for the Korean Theater Missile Operations Cell; JITC anticipates that all three FMS Cases will be executed during calendar year 2016. JITC is also currently conducting TDL standards conformance testing for the ROK AW-159 Maritime Operations Helicopter and the ROK Cheolmae-II Surface-to-Air Missile system.

The K-JITC was founded in 2007 in Seoul, ROK, to provide technical support and professional testing services for the ROK Ministry of Defense. K-JITC currently has a workforce of 150 military and government personnel. JITC has provided support to K-JITC since 2009.
http://jitc.fhu.disa.mil/organization/newsEvents/news/index.aspx


adroth

  • Administrator
  • Boffin
  • *****
  • Posts: 11934
    • View Profile
    • The ADROTH Project
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #12 on: May 03, 2020, 02:02:22 AM »
At heart of the current round of defense social media discussions is the state of certification that Ultra Electronics enjoys with the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC).

A Balik-Scientist who used to be with SPAWAR in San Diego, and still has connections within, has already stated that Ultra Electronics' Link16 simulator is currently not JITC's list. 

Given that the link above is dated 2009, it does beg the question . . . what happened to that "independent testing capability"?

Ultra awarded contract to deliver MDLMS to three destroyers of the Republic of Korea Navy


05/04/17

https://www.ultra-ats.com/latest-news/ultra-awarded-contract-to-deliver-mdlms-to-three-destroyers-of-the-republic-of-korea-navy/


Quote
  Ultra Electronics Advanced Tactical Systems (ATS) was recently awarded a contract to deliver Ultra’s Multi Data Link Management System (MDLMS) to three destroyers for the Republic of Korea Navy. The MDLMS provide the ability to communicate tactical information over a secure, jam-resistant data link using the latest Multifunctional Information Distribution System Joint Tactical Radio System (MIDS JTRS) terminals.

In partnership with Hanwha Systems Co. and supporting the Republic of Korea Defence Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA), the modernization of these destroyers will go through full standards conformance testing of its new Link 16 suite. MDLMS will provide the Republic of Korea Navy with enhanced interoperability with United States Navy maritime and airborne platforms via its certified gateway using the same router installed in Ultra’s flagship product; the Air Defense Systems Integrator (ADSI)®.

Upon successful completion of this program, up to six additional destroyers are planned to be upgraded.

Tim Stanley, ATS President, stated:

“I am pleased to be partnering Hanwha Systems and look forward to continuing our work with the Republic of Korea. This contract underscores our continuing growth and expanding relationships with international partners to bring state of the art Command and Control, sensor correlation and certified datalink gateway functionality into the battlespace.”
« Last Edit: May 03, 2020, 10:15:52 AM by adroth »

LionFlyer

  • Timawan
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 267
    • View Profile
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2020, 08:45:28 AM »
K-JITC Link-16 SCT Capability Development Plan Standards Conformance Test (SCT)

K-JITC does appear to have the capability to conduct the CIT (Combined Interoperability Test) stated by JITC. I would imagine that the final test results would still have to be submitted to JITC/MIDS. I don't think certification can be issued in country. But hey, what do it know? I am not the expert.

maverick2007

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 9
    • View Profile
Re: Frigate Acquisition Project: Tactical Data Link
« Reply #14 on: May 04, 2020, 08:30:27 AM »
According to  Leo Madrid Almazan , A DOST balik scientist from his latest FB post:

Quote
Seriously, the operating word is “conditionally accepted.” The USN has the same criteria if the systems operational and verification tests have some unacceptable issues! The USN will just accept it on the condition that issues shall and that is the operating word, SHALL (more legal), fix the issue or problem before the system is 100% accepted!

Quote
the tests are all done! Just waiting for HHI to use an accepted Link-16 simulator tester so the US JITC can certify the Link-16 terminal aboard the frigates!

Turn-over is imminent  8)