Author Topic: Retitled: Saving Boracay  (Read 526 times)

adroth

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Retitled: Saving Boracay
« on: March 07, 2018, 07:53:14 PM »
Administrator's note: See also:

One-stop shop for Boracay establishments
TIEZA gets regulatory powers over Boracay water concessionaires
Guards bar DENR's Cimatu from Boracay mega-casino property


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PRRD to declare state of calamity in Boracay
 March 7, 2018, 7:56 am

http://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1027688

MANILA -- President Rodrigo R. Duterte announced on Tuesday, March 6, that he would place Boracay under a state of calamity.

“Ngayon, I know it work hardships and that is why I would be declaring a state of calamity,” he said in a speech during the oath taking of the Presidential Anti-Corruption Commission at Malacañan Palace.

The Chief Executive explained that placing the island under a state of calamity would allow the government to extend assistance to those who are displaced financially.

“Ang state of calamity may component ’yan na pambigay talaga for those who are displaced financially,” he said.

The President said he ordered Department of Interior and Local Government officer-in-charge Eduardo Año to put an end to Boracay’s problem in six months.

“Sabi ko na, ‘Sir, inutusan kita six months. Tapusin mo. ‘Yung hanap ka. Six months. Tapusin mo ‘yang problema sa Boracay,’” he said.

At the same time, Duterte urged the public to work together with the government in the clean-up of the island.

“In the meantime, if I were from Boracay or you guys there, the best thing for you to do is to cooperate with the government and hasten the cleanup,” he said.

The President explained that the problem in the island is an issue of public interest, public safety, and public health.

“So ‘yang tatlo na ‘yan I am invoking it and it is one of the -- mga abugado dito, a mass function of… I can order for this thing to happen because it is of public interest, public safety and public health. Para malaman ninyo,” he said.

Duterte also warned the courts not to interfere by issuing a temporary restraining order (TRO).

“I would caution the courts not to interfere by issuing TRO because you would just exacerbate the situation and the worse, baka hindi kita paniwalaan,” he said.

Last month, the President described the island as a cesspool and has ordered Environment Secretary Roy Cimatu to clean up Boracay.

Meanwhile, the President said the deployment ban in Kuwait would remain until his conditions are met.

“Ang sabi ko, the ban stays until I meet the guys and talk,” he said.

He said employers should treat overseas Filipino workers well by allowing them to get enough sleep and food; should not confiscate their passports, and should not be sexually assaulted.

"Ngayon, ‘pag wala ‘yan, sorry. Umuwi kayo dito," he said.

In a press conference in February, the President announced the deployment ban in Kuwait amid the deaths of domestic workers.

The PACC officials sworn in by the President were Dante Jimenez as chairman; Greco Belgica, Rickson Chiong, Gregorio Luis Contacto III as commissioners; and Eduardo Bringas as executive director. (PND)
« Last Edit: October 29, 2018, 06:44:43 PM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: PRRD to declare state of calamity in Boracay
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2018, 07:54:20 PM »
Boracay problem due to lack of participatory governance: DILG exec
By Liza Agoot  March 7, 2018, 1:09 pm

http://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1027633

BAGUIO CITY — The environmental degradation issue now hounding the island resort of Boracay municipality in Aklan could be due to years of lack of participatory governance--or simply, lack of coordination--a government official said here on Tuesday.

Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) Undersecretary Austere Panadero, on the sidelines of the Open Government and Participatory Governance regional dialogue for Luzon (cluster 2) here, said Boracay's situation now did not happen overnight, but took about 10 years to blow up.

"Ang sitwasyon (sa Boracay) hindi nangyari nang biglaan, mahabang panahon, may mga nangyayari 10 years back that compounded the situation today (The situation in Boracay did not happen overnight; it took many years; some happened even 10 years back that compounded the situation today),” Panadero said, pointing out there was lack of participatory governance in Boracay.

Panadero said participatory governance is bringing all sectors together, getting inputs from various sectors in the locality to come up with a decision on issues, including plans and programs that have future effects on the community.

He said the government is now looking closely at the situation and those found to have done well would be praised, while those who did wrong would be punished.

He said the DILG, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), Department of Tourism (DOT), Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH), and the local government units concerned would come up with a consolidated report and united stand on how to save the place from further destruction.

“Sa kasalukuyan lahat yan inaaral na mabuti (at present, all those are being studied very well),” the official said, noting the different sectors in Boracay vary in their plans of action.

"May business sector, local government, development councils--hindi nagkatugma-tugma ng balak kung ano gagawin. Siguro ang isang scenario nangyari dyan, napakabilis ng development, ang pagtayo ng mga commercial establishments. Hindi nakasabay ng husto ang infrastructure, maraming shortcuts. So yun ang naging dahilan kung ano yung mga nangyayari ngayon (There is the business sector, local government, development councils--their plans did not align with each other. Maybe, one scenario that happened there is too rapid development. The construction of commercial establishments was not able to equal that of the infrastructure requirement. A lot of shortcuts were done. That is the reason for what is happening at present).”

Panadero described the Boracay issue as a “template for future development".

"That is the guidance that the Cabinet has given to all implementing agencies involved in implementing the environmental laws,” he said. (PNA)

adroth

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Re: PRRD to declare state of calamity in Boracay
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2018, 01:28:45 PM »
May 28, 2015
JICA, Japanese, Filipino scientists' project backs conservation of ‘highly endangered' Boracay ecosystem

https://www.jica.go.jp/philippine/english/office/topics/news/150528.html

The Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and a group of Japanese and Filipino scientists warned of "imminent loss" if the current environment situation in Boracay Island prevails.

A study on Boracay conducted from 2010 to 2015 involving Japanese and Filipino scientists as part of JICA project called Coastal Ecosystem Conservation and Adaptive Management (CECAM) showed that Boracay's coral reef ecosystem has been seriously degraded by tourism-related activities.

Based on analysis of satellite images, coral cover in Boracay declined by about 70.5% for the past 23 years (1988-2011). The highest decrease in coral cover recorded over the 23-year period was between 2008 and 2011 as tourist arrivals rose by 38.4%.

Unmonitored snorkelling and diving activities in coral rich areas have contributed to damage sustained by corals, according to study.

"JICA shares the collective vision of stakeholders in Boracay to promote a more sustainable tourism development in the island. Through CECAM findings, we hope that LGUs and policy makers will be able to use scientific and technological knowledge from the project to address critical environment issues affecting the study's pilot sites," said JICA Senior Representative Takahiro Morita.

"Tourism is an important economic driver in the Philippines. By protecting marine resources, we are also helping sustain the tourism industry, and jobs creation in the country," added Morita.

The island is also experiencing beach erosion. Thus, as part of the CECAM initiative, JICA has installed five closed circuit television cameras (CCTV) along the beach for real-time monitoring of wave conditions and observation of algal blooms or green tide.

The CCTVs also helped CECAM scientists analyze shrinking of beach area and sand erosion that affect the island especially during dry seasons.

Boracay is a world-renowned tourist destination known for its 4-kilometer beach of powdery white sand. Uncontrolled commercial development of the 1,000 hectare island since the 1990s continues to threaten the island's environment.

CECAM scientist Dr. Miguel Fortes from the University of the Philippines (UP) also cautioned that water quality level at the eastern part of Boracay beach is alarming, making it unsafe for swimming and other human activities.

Direct discharge of untreated waste water near the shore brings about poor water quality level that consequently results in frequent algal blooms and coral reef deterioration.

"It's very crucial that the sustainability of Boracay's environment will not be exchanged for short-term economic gains. We hope to continue working with planners and policy makers in the island through knowledge and technology sharing that will help conserve the coastal environment. The use of geospatial technology and decision support systems needs to be operationally incorporated within the planning and decision making process," said Dr. Ariel Blanco, another CECAM scientist from UP.

The coral reef ecosystem is Boracay's most important resource. According to sediment analysis, Boracay's famous white sand is mostly from coral fragments and the seaweed Halimeda. Coral reefs also lessen the impact of strong waves to the beach hence protecting it from sand erosion.

Aside from Boracay, the CECAM project also covered other pilot sites that have their own ecosystem challenges such as Bolinao in Pangasinan, Puerto Galera in Mindoro Oriental, Taklong in Guimaras, Naawan in Misamis Oriental, Laguna Lake and Manila Bay in Metro Manila.

CECAM is part of the "Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development" (SATREPS), established jointly by JICA and the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). Among others, it aims to address global issues through international research by Japanese researchers collaborating with their counterparts in developing countries.

adroth

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Re: PRRD to declare state of calamity in Boracay
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2018, 08:14:42 PM »
Tourism Sec. Bernadette Puyat: ‘Tourists should manage expectations on Boracay’
Catherine Talavera (The Philippine Star) - October 12, 2018 - 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines — Tourists should manage their expectations of Boracay after the island remained as one of the best in Asia as voted by readers of Conde Nast Traveler, Tourism Secretary Bernadette Romulo-Puyat said yesterday.

“It is an honor for our destinations to be voted once again in the Condé Nast Traveler Readers’ Choice Awards. This serves as an invitation to the tourists in time for the winter vacation,” Puyat said in a statement.

Despite its closure to tourists, Boracay remains of interest to foreign tourists as it secured second spot on the list.

< Edited >

Boracay, which is currently undergoing rehabilitation, is set for a soft opening on Oct. 26.

Puyat earlier said the rehabilitation of the island would continue even after its soft opening, as it will be done in phases.

Completion of the first phase of the rehabilitation will be in October, Phase 2 by the middle of 2019 and Phase 3 by the end of 2019.

< Edited >

Read more at https://www.philstar.com/headlines/2018/10/12/1859337/tourism-sec-bernadette-puyat-tourists-should-manage-expectations-boracay#V2qoaLhhbxsFwHP2.99

adroth

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Re: Retitled: Saving Boracay
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2018, 06:13:10 PM »
What's happening in Boracay, the island paradise ruined by tourism?
Hugh Morris, travel writer
13 SEPTEMBER 2018 • 1:09PM

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/asia/philippines/articles/boracay-closure-when-will-island-reopen/

Boracay, a tiny island once considered among the world’s most idyllic – but closed to visitors earlier this year due to the effects of overtourism, is in a race against the clock to be ready for its reopening date next month.

The tiny outcrop in the Philippines has been off-limits since April, when a six-month period of repair and restoration was announced after the country’s president described it as a “cesspool”. But now, with the reopening date just six weeks away, tourism experts say the island is still recovering.

What is Boracay and why was it shut?

The Philippines has experienced a surge in tourists in recent years. Just over one million went there in 1990 – last year it was 6.6m. And almost a third of those tourists - more than two million - visited Boracay, which measures just 3.98 square miles and has a resident population of just 30,000. That’s all the more remarkable when you consider that the Philippines has 7,640 other islands to choose from, according to the most recent estimate from the country’s National Mapping and Resource Information Authority.

A decade ago, Boracay certainly was worth visiting. The magazine Travel+Leisure declared it the best island in the world back in 2012, thanks largely to the powder soft sand of White Beach. But back in April Rodrigo Duterte called it a “cesspool”. His verdict came after a video showing sewage flowing directly into Boracay’s blue waters went viral. The controversial leader castigated local authorities for permitting unchecked development and dispatched an emergency government taskforce to save the island from an ecological catastrophe. Inspectors found over 800 environmental violations. Figures showed that rubbish generated per person on Boracay was more than three times higher than in the capital, Manila.

< Edited >

adroth

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Re: Retitled: Saving Boracay
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2018, 06:19:14 PM »
Tourists to sign oath before entering reopened Philippine island
THIS stunning island has reopened to visitors after a six-month shutdown. But there’s an unusual condition of entry they now have to agree to.

Caroline McGuire
The Sun
OCTOBER 30, 201811:50AM

https://www.news.com.au/travel/world-travel/asia/tourists-to-sign-oath-before-entering-reopened-philippine-island/news-story/ed0c641539352bf7aae8228e31b7b382

BOATLOADS of tourists have finally started returning to an island paradise locked up for six months.

Officials reopened Boracay Island in the Philippines to visitors after a shutdown to clean waters President Rodrigo Duterte had called a “cesspool” due to years of overcrowding, partying and neglect, The Sun reported.

And now, officials have imposed new rules to regulate the influx of visitors and beach parties, decongest resorts and prevent sewage from being discharged directly into the turquoise waters.

Only a portion of Boracay’s hotels and other businesses have reopened under the new rules, and a fraction of the more than 20,000 workers who lost their jobs have been rehired.

< Edited >

Visitors will be kept to about 6000 daily and, in an unusual move, they will be asked to sign an oath to follow the new rules, including proper waste disposal and a ban on liquor, smoking, bonfires and wild partying on the beach, officials said.

Only 157 of Boracay’s hundreds of hotels, inns, restaurants and souvenir shops have reopened after complying with the regulations, including connecting to authorised sewer pipes and maintaining a 30m distance from the ocean.

< Edited >

Just two years ago, Boracay was voted the world’s best island.

But in February, Mr Duterte ordered Boracay shut for rehabilitation and said the waste being discharged into the sea had made its waters a “cesspool”.

During the closure, authorities discovered a hidden sewage pipe discharging waste directly into the coastal waters and two hotels built on restricted wetlands.

Some resorts were demolished because they had encroached into a no-build area fronting the sea — one of many violations that had been unchecked for years.

A mayor was suspended and 16 other officials faced complaints of neglect of duty over Boracay’s deterioration.

< Edited >