Author Topic: Diwata 1 - First Philippine microsatellite  (Read 2328 times)

adroth

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Diwata 1 - First Philippine microsatellite
« on: October 07, 2016, 10:54:56 AM »
First Philippine satellite reaches space station
By Rainier Allan Ronda (The Philippine Star) | Updated March 28, 2016 - 12:00am

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2016/03/28/1566913/first-philippine-satellite-reaches-space-station

MANILA, Philippines – The US commercial spacecraft Cygnus carrying the Philippines’ first microsatellite Diwata-1 has successfully reached the International Space Station (ISS) and is now being unloaded of its 7,500-pound payload.

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He said the deployment into orbit of Diwata-1 was scheduled on April 20 or 21.

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At the ISS, Diwata-1 will be placed inside the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD), nicknamed “Kibo.”

Toward the end of April, Kibo will release Diwata-1 into space at an altitude of 400 kilometers from the earth’s surface.

In the weeks leading to this, DOST-PCIEERED and another unit, the DOST Advanced Science and Technology Institute will speed up work on the setting up of a temporary ground receiving station in the DOST ASTI building that will receive the satellite images taken by Diwata-1.

Ayoshi

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Re: Diwata 1 - First Philippine microsatellite
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2016, 01:02:21 PM »
dost.gov.ph

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The benefits of having our own satellite

DIWATA-1 is a low earth orbit (LEO) satellite set to fly 400km above the earth. It serves as a training platform and pave the way for the Filipino team to further develop their skills in space technology.


But more than this, the potential uses of Diwata’s images include improved weather detection and forecasts, disaster risk management, detecting agricultural growth patterns, monitoring of the forest cover, mining, protection of cultural and historical sites, and the territorial borders of the Philippines Through its sensor, Diwata will be sending vital images and data back to Philippine Earth Data Resources and Observation (PEDRO) Center which was set up to receive data from the satellite.

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DIWATA 1 is equipped with a High Precision Telescope (HPT) that can determine the extent of damages from disasters, like typhoons and volcanic eruptions. It can also monitor changes in cultural and natural heritage sites, like the Mount Apo or Mayon Volcano.
 
Its Spaceborne Multispectral Imager with LCTF will be able to monitor changes in vegetation and monitor oceans productivity.
 
It also carries a Wide Field Camera that will help scientists and weather forecasters tp better observe cloud patterns and more accurately predict weather disturbances. Its Middle Field Camera assists in determining the locations of images captured using the HPT and SMI.


This is how those Filipino students/scientists will assemble Diwata. (Image: JAXA)

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Photo taken from pcieerd.dost.gov.ph

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NASA ATLAS V with Diwata 1

Photo taken from philstar.com
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Photo taken from nasa.gov
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First Philippine MicroSatellite DIWATA-1 Launched

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YouTube Video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gB8qhtlVgUI
« Last Edit: October 11, 2016, 04:13:55 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: Diwata 1 - First Philippine microsatellite
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2020, 11:52:54 AM »
https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1270303/new-study-confirms-decommissioned-microsat-diwata-1-can-measure-cloud-top-height

Quote
New study confirms decommissioned microsat Diwata-1 can measure cloud-top height
INQUIRER.net / 09:32 PM May 05, 2020

A study from the open-source international journal Scientific Reports – shared on Tuesday by the Space Technology and Applications Mastery, Innovation and Advancement (STAMINA4Space) Program which handled Diwata-1 – said this is due to the microsatellite’s ability to lock targets or take photos of cloud bands in various angles as it moves around the earth.

Initially, it was thought that remote-sensing earth-observation satellites can only provide a bird’s-eye view of the clouds, as they can use cameras facing the earth while on low earth orbit.  However, the target-locking mode which captures cloud images at a fast speed of 200 milliseconds can create three-dimensional images of clouds.

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According to STAMINA4Space, estimating cloud-top heights can give an insight in the development of thunderstorms, and is highly essential during the Philippines’ dry months as it can help predict the amount of rainfall that would be generated after the summer season.

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Diwata-1, a 50-kilogram microsatellite, was decommissioned last April 7, 2020, after it eventually lost altitude and re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere.  Still, Diwata-1 exceeded its initial slated lifespan of 18 months, feeding scientists with data for almost four years.

During its lifetime, Diwata-1 covered at least 114,087 km. sq. of the Philippines’ land, or roughly 38.0% of the country’s area.  Diwata-1 also orbited approximately 22,643 times around the Earth and passed by the Philippines roughly 4,800 times.

STAMINA4Space said Diwata-1 served as a blueprint for other satellite releases including the Maya-1, the nanocube satellite launched in August 2018 tasked to help scientists create geohazard maps.