Author Topic: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft  (Read 14973 times)

adroth

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Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« on: September 24, 2016, 12:41:04 PM »
The official Website

http://www.tejas.gov.in/


Ayoshi

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2016, 11:55:48 PM »
India signs for 83 more Tejas Mk-1A fighter jets | Air Recognition - 09 November 2016
Quote
The DAC decision brings the total number of Tejas fighters ordered to 123 examples. A first batch of Tejas fighters was ordered in 2006, followed by a second batch of 20 aircraft in 2010. This new order brings the total number of Tejas fighters ordered to 123.

The Tejas Mk-1A will feature major improvements such as an Israeli Elta 2052 AESA radar, pod mounted Electronic Warfare (EW) suite, and Cobham in-flight refueling probe. India's Development Agency (AGA) is also considering additional AAMs and precision munitions Aeronautical.

A HAL Tejas Mk1 fighter jet (Credit: Ashwin Kumar)

adroth

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2017, 11:23:41 AM »
India Took a Shocking 33 Years to Develop a Jet Fighter (And It’s Still Not Ready for Combat)
Dave Majumdar
November 23, 2016

http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/india-took-shocking-33-years-develop-jet-fighter-its-still-18505

The Indian government is proposing to export its Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) Tejas light combat aircraft to other Asian nations. New Delhi hopes that the indigenously developed fighter’s relatively simple design and potentially low maintenance costs will be a selling point for the jet. But India’s prospects for selling the its “new” fighter are highly dubious.

“The government proposes to export the Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) Tejas to other countries. In this connection preliminary discussions have been held with a few friendly countries,” reads a statement from Indian defense minister Shri Manohar Parrikar. “Presently, HAL has established facilities for manufacturing and delivery of 8 LCA per annum. There is a plan to ramp up the production rate from 8 to 16 Aircraft per annum progressively by 2019-20.”

It’s unclear which potential customers might be interested in the Tejas, though New Delhi has been trying to market the jet overseas with an appearance at the Bahrain air show earlier this year. But given that India has been trying to develop the Tejas since the 1980s without delivering a viable combat aircraft, it is highly doubtful that any of New Delhi’s allies would be willing to purchase such a fighter. Moreover, even after more than 33 years of development, the Tejas continues to be plagued with problems—though developers believe that they can resolve outstanding issues with the aircraft within a year. “I told them that all shortcomings should be fulfilled and the plane should be ready in a year,” Parrikar told the Hindustan Times on Nov. 20.

< Edited >

Despite, India’s bold claims, the generally unimpressive Tejas is not in the same league as other comparable aircraft in the export fighter market. The Swedish Saab JAS-39 Gripen and even upgraded older model F-16s and F/A-18s generally offer superior performance for comparable and sometimes even lower prices. Moreover, the Tejas—with a hodgepodge of technologies drawn from Israel, France, Russia and the United States, among others—would be a nightmare to clear for export.

Despite being billed as an indigenous aircraft, roughly 25 percent of the current Mk-1 version of the aircraft is built from imported components. While that might seem fairly low, those components are the core of what makes a fighter a fighter. Imported systems on the Tejas include the Israel Aerospace Industries/ELTA EL/M-2032 radar, an Elbit helmet-mounted cueing system, a British-made Martin Baker ejection seat and an American General Electric F404 afterburning turbofan. Additionally, many of the jet’s weapons—such as the GSh-23 23 mm cannon—are of Russian origin. Indeed, the very fact that the Tejas is equipped with a U.S. engine means that Washington has a veto on which nations New Delhi can offer the aircraft to for sale. Thus, a potential customer might be better served to simply purchase a used F-16 or F/A-18—which are far better jets with a far more attractive package of weapons (not to mention political clout).

Meanwhile, India recently ordered 83 more Tejas Mk-1A jets, a slightly refined version of the current Mk-1 aircraft, of which 20 are on order. The Tejas Mk-1A will replace the current mechanically-scanned radar with a new Israel Aerospace Industries/ELTA EL/M-2052 active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, a new electronic warfare pod and a Cobham in-flight refueling probe. There are also a host of other improvements to correct the deficiencies found on the original Mk-1.

< Edited >

adroth

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2017, 01:48:25 PM »
http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/india-took-shocking-33-years-develop-jet-fighter-its-still-18505

< Edited >

New Delhi is continuing to refine the aging Tejas design with the Mk-II version, which is set to make its debut in 2025. The new version of the jet will be equipped with the 22,000-pound thrust class General Electric F414 engine, which was originally developed for the Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet. However, the Indians are attempting to revive the failed Kaveri indigenous engine that was originally slated to power the Tejas before it became glaringly apparent that it was not up to the task. The France’s Snecma is working with the Indians to certify the Kaveri engine for the flight of a Tejas light combat aircraft prototype in 2018.

Ayoshi

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2017, 05:50:02 PM »
Saab offers advanced sensor suite for India's Tejas LCA Mk1A fighter jet | Air Recognition - 15 February 2017
Quote
Saab, in partnership with Indian industry, offers a solution that will bring the required Airborne Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) Fighter radar and Electronic warfare capability to India and the Indian Air Force. Thanks to our extensive technology development Saab can offer the latest technology, on time for the LCA Mk 1A needs, at low risk.

The AESA fighter radar is developed by Saab with antenna technology based on the latest technologies using Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Silicone Carbide (SiC) substrates in combination with the latest generation of exciter/receiver and processor technology, giving optimum installed performance in a dense signal environment.


A IAF's Tejas LCA Mk1A fighter jet taking off during Aero India 2017 (Credit: Ministry of Defence of India)

adroth

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2017, 10:51:23 AM »
View: Navy's rejection of Tejas is a lesson, failure of DRDO
BY IANS | UPDATED: FEB 08, 2017, 08.08 PM ISTPost a Comment

The peremptory rejection of the shipborne variant of the Tejas light combat aircraft (LCA) by the Indian Navy seems to have surprised most navy-watching analysts. Their confusion has been compounded by the near-simultaneous issuance of a global request for information (RFI) for procurement of "57 multirole fighters for its aircraft carriers" by Naval HQ.

One can deduce two compelling reasons for this, seemingly, radical volte face by the only service which has shown unswerving commitment to indigenisation (lately labelled 'Make in India') for the past six decades.

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/57034043.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/57034043.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst


mamiyapis

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2017, 10:13:55 PM »
The Tejas is a joke of an aircraft, already under production and yet still seemingly changing it's internal systems on the whim of either the DRDO, AGA, or the IAF.

Some Indians are very touchy on the aircraft and defend it despite every major defense news agency calling it a failed aircraft.

adroth

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2017, 05:46:06 AM »
http://m.timesofindia.com/india/Navy-rejects-Tejas-says-overweight-fighter-does-not-meet-its-requirements/articleshow/55756350.cms

While the IAF is going to get at least 120 Tejas, under the LCA project which was cleared way back in 1983, while the Navy was supposed to get around 50 of the indigenous fighters. In August this year, IAF finally inducted the first two Tejas fighters in the 45 "Flying Daggers" Squadron, which will be fully constituted with 20 jets only by 2018.

IAF had earlier ordered 40 Tejas jets, with the defence ministry in November giving the initial approval for procurement of another 83 Tejas Mark-1A fighters from HAL for Rs 50,025 crore. The Mark-1A version, which is the one IAF really wants, will be ready only by 2020 or so. It will have an AESA (active electronically scanned array) radar and advanced electronic warfare (EW) suite, as also be capable of mid-air refuelling and firing advanced BVR (beyond visual range) missiles.

adroth

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2017, 03:27:35 PM »
Bahrain Air Show 2016. See time index 2:49

https://youtu.be/vVpXdhVW7P4

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Deploying ordnance

https://youtu.be/a4faKAJXpcg

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National Geographic (2012)

https://youtu.be/GZgQeESL0q4

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https://youtu.be/AmI-FTuGxtk

Published on Mar 11, 2015

With three consecutive start-ups of its engine after overnight soak in extreme cold (around -15ºC) conditions of Ladakh, that too without any external assistance, Tejas, the Indian Light Combat Aircraft has achieved yet another and a rare distinction. Starting the fighter aircraft under such extreme condition without any external assistance or heating is a technology breakthrough. The requirements become further stringent when the starting is to be done three times consecutively with a partially charged battery. Team LCA led by AERD&C of HAL, and members from ADA, NFTC, IAF, CEMILAC and DGAQA have succeeded in achieving this.
Copyright: ADA
« Last Edit: July 02, 2017, 04:29:33 PM by adroth »

Ayoshi

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2017, 12:50:16 PM »
India’s Tejas programme suffers more delays | IHS Jane's 360 - 09 August 2017
Quote
The MoD said in a statement on 4 August that state-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) has delivered just four aircraft to the IAF out of 40 ordered in 2005. All these aircraft were previously scheduled to be delivered to the IAF by 2017–18.

The four aircraft so far delivered are from a batch of 20 designated for initial operational clearance (IOC), while the remaining 20 aircraft were designated for final operational clearance (FOC).

The MoD said that 12 remaining aircraft under the IOC batch are at the production stage and four more aircraft, which will be used as trainers, will be produced following necessary approvals by the MoD’s Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA).

It added that production of the 20 FOC aircraft will also depend on clearance by the ADA, which has led the Tejas development programme for the past three decades.


The Indian Air Force has received just four Tejas LCA aircraft out of an order for 40 placed in 2005. Source: IHS Markit/Patrick Allen

Ayoshi

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2017, 05:56:10 PM »
HAL aims to double production of LCA over next three years | IHS Jane's 360 - 23 August 2017
Quote
India’s state-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) aims to double production of the indigenously developed Tejas Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) for the Indian Air Force (IAF) from 8 to 16 platforms per year from 2019-20, company officials have said.

HAL intends to accomplish this by investing an additional INR12.31 billion (USD191.78 million) in expanding the existing LCA assembly line in Bangalore and establishing a second one by using its BAE Systems Hawk 132 jet trainer licence-building facility.


A HAL Tejas takes off with a full load. The programme overall has struggled to get off the ground, but HAL now has plans to ramp up production. (HAL)
« Last Edit: August 23, 2017, 10:05:15 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2017, 11:03:41 PM »
From: india.com - Updated: November 27, 2017
Quote
New Delhi, Nov 29: India is developing an ultra-light version of its supersonic cruise missile BrahMos which can be fired from the indigenous Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) Tejas. With the successful test-firing of a modified Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM) BrahMos from multi-role air superiority fighter Sukhoi SU-30 MKI, Indian Air Force (IAF) is confident of getting the missile configured on Tejas.

The version which will be fitted on Tejas will be called BrahMos NG (BrahMos Lite) and it will be much lighter although the payload will be the same. The weight of BrahMos NG is expected to be just 1.4 tonnes and the range too will be only 120 km. The version of BrahMos to be fitted on Tejas is expected to be ready by 2019. Each Su-30 MKI can carry just one BrahMos each weighing 2.5 tonne with either a conventional or nuclear warhead weighing 300 kg and a range of 300-400 km.

adroth

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2017, 01:36:03 PM »
Note: Related discussion on the forum’s FB extension: https://m.facebook.com/groups/781170378635478?view=permalink&id=1508341009251741&ref=m_notif&notif_t=like

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Tejas far behind competitors, not enough to protect Indian skies: IAF
The IAF made a presentation to the government to explain why Tejas alone can't meet India's requirements.

Sudhi Ranjan Sen  | Posted by Sonalee Borgohain
New Delhi, November 10, 2017 | UPDATED 19:54 IST

http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/tejas-indian-air-force-f-16-mig-21-fighter-planes-ajit-doval/1/1086425.html

The IAF made a presentation to the government to explain why Tejas lags behind Sweden-made JAS 39 and US F-16.The IAF made a presentation to the government to explain why Tejas lags behind Sweden-made JAS 39 and US F-16.

Tejas - the indigenously made Light-Combat single engine fighter - isn't enough to protect Indian skies, the India Air Force (IAF) has told the government. The response came after the South Block asked the IAF to scrap its plans of acquiring single-engine fighters from global, top sources told India Today.

The IAF said the Tejas is far behind its competitors like the JAS 39 Gripen manufactured by the Swedish aerospace company Saab and the US made F-16 manufactured by Lockheed Martin, sources said.

National Security Advisor Ajit Doval is understood to have raised the issue following which the government asked the IAF to scrap its plans to acquire foreign made single engine fighters and go for the Indian made fighters only. Recently, the IAF made a presentation to the government to explain why Tejas alone can't meet India's requirements.

Documents accessed by India Today reveal that the IAF has told the government that the "endurance" of Tejas in combat is just about 59 minutes as against 3 hours of Gripen and nearly 4 fours for the F-16. Also, Tejas can carry a pay-load of about three tons against nearly six tons and seven tons by the Gripen and F-16 respectively.

"In other words, for target that needs about 36 bombs to be destroyed, one will have to deploy six Tejas as against just three Gripen or F-16," the IAF has told the government.

The IAF has also said Tejas needs 20 hours of serving for every hour of flying as against six hours for Gripen and 3.5 hours for F-16.

< Edited >
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 09:24:16 PM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2017, 02:10:36 PM »
Indian Air Force: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft Can’t Protect Indian Skies
A new report by the IAF said that the Tejas fighter jet lags behind its foreign competitors like the JAS-39 Gripen.


By Franz-Stefan Gady
November 14, 2017
     
https://thediplomat.com/2017/11/indian-air-force-tejas-light-combat-aircraft-cant-protect-indian-skies/
 
< Edited >

According to IAF assessments, the Tejas LCA, when compared to Saab’s JAS-39 Gripen and Lockheed Martin’s F-16, boasts reduced airborne endurance — 59 minutes versus three hours for the Gripen and nearly four hours for the F-16. The Tejas can also only carry a weapons payload of around three tons against nearly six tons by the Gripen and seven tons by the F-16.

Furthermore, maintenance requirements for the Tejas LCA are also higher than with foreign combat aircraft. The Tejas LCA requires 20 hours of serving for every hour of flying against six hours for the Gripen and 3.5 hours for the F-16. In addition, the service life of the Tejas LCA is also half that of the 40 years found in both the Gripen and F-16.

< Edited >

HAL has repeatedly stated that it intends to address the technical shortfalls. In May 2015, the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) of India — the Indian government’s principal oversight body —issued a report highlighting technical problems with the Tejas LCA, including inadequate electronic warfare capabilities, problems with the onboard radar system, and reduced internal-fuel capacity.

The shortcomings are expected to be tackled in the upgraded Mark I-A variant of the LCA, which was slated to take to the skies for the first time this year. The upgraded LCA will be fitted with an advanced AESA radar system and a new electronic warfare sensor suite, among other thing. The IAF also wants to arm its Tejas fleet with I-Derby beyond-visual-range (BVR) air-to-air missile.

< Edited >

However, HAL has not been able to meet the target of producing eight Tejas aircraft per year. In July 2016, the IAF inducted the first two serially-produced LCAs, followed by two more aircraft in the same year. Twelve more aircraft are currently at the production stage. The Indian government has also been pushing HAL to ramp up production capacity from eight to 16 aircraft per year.

Ayoshi

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Re: Tejas Light Combat Aircraft
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2018, 05:23:23 PM »
India’s LCA Tejas demonstrates hot refuelling capability | Janes - 28 February 2018
Quote
India’s locally designed Tejas Light Combat Aircraft (LCA) has demonstrated its hot refuelling capability, the state-owned Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) announced on 27 February: a move that brings the platform closer to achieving final operational clearance (FOC).

< snipped >

The Tejas LCA is the first aircraft in the Indian Air Force (IAF) service being qualified for hot refuelling, HAL added.

The latest development comes after the IAF issued a request for proposal (RFP) to HAL on 20 December 2017 for the procurement of 83 Tejas LCAs for an estimated INR500.25 billion (USD7.8 billion).


HAL carried out a hot refuelling of a Tejas LCA on 26 February. (HAL)