Author Topic: The Philippines' Strategic Relationship With India  (Read 871 times)

adroth

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The Philippines' Strategic Relationship With India
« on: January 28, 2018, 09:55:50 AM »
The Philippines' Strategic Relationship With India
Duterte’s visit to India highlights a long-standing relationship with more potential for growth.

By Chester Cabalza
January 27, 2018
     
https://thediplomat.com/2018/01/the-philippines-strategic-relationship-with-india/
 
The 61-year old Treaty of Friendship signed in Manila on July 11, 1952 between India and the Philippines was cemented again by Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte as he attended the India-ASEAN Commemorative Summit in New Delhi hosted by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Duterte and Modi exchanged economic and political views, including discussing the possibility of military cooperation. The defense relations of the two maritime nation-states have been marked by frequent visits by Indian navy warships and coast guard ships to the Philippines since 1998 and thereafter in 2017 under the terms of the 2006 Philippines-India Defense Cooperation Agreement.

Being natural allies — English-speaking democratic stalwarts with shared experiences of Western colonialism — India has supported the Philippines’ positions on quite a few international issues, including world trade, labor, and even the latter’s quest in 2004 to become a nonpermanent member of the UN Security Council from 2005 to 2006, when India withdrew its candidacy in favor of the Philippines. In 2011, the Philippines also supported India, as the latter was elected to the rotating two-year membership in the Security Council. For more than a decade, the Philippines and India have continuously held bilateral negotiations assessing their progress on trade, investment, economic, technical, scientific, and technical cooperation. With the world’s exponential growth in digitization and globalization, both countries have emerged as frontline service sectors in the business process outsourcing industry.

The renewed relationship has cemented almost 40 bilateral agreements and memoranda of understanding, alongside several rounds of mutual visits by top leaders, and people -to-people exchanges that have enhanced ancient trade and cultural ties. Amidst the volatile geopolitical and strategic ambiguities in the Indo-Pacific region, New Delhi’s expanding defense posture and economic success can provide prospects for shaping the balance of power in the region.

After the arbitral tribunal’s verdict over the South China Sea case filed by the Philippines against China, India used its influence among Asian neighbors to push for peaceful resolution of maritime differences. As a naval power itself, India had a moral responsibility to push for freedom of navigation as a global interest, asserting that no state has a monopoly over the seas and oceans. India hopes that assertions of maritime and international laws will prevail in maintaining an equitable balance of powers in an evolving multipolar world.

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adroth

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Re: The Philippines' Strategic Relationship With India
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2019, 08:07:44 AM »
How things have moved forward since

PH Army officials visit Indian ship with supersonic missile
By Priam Nepomuceno  October 25, 2019, 9:35 pm

https://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1084246

MANILA -- Ranking Philippine Army (PA) officials on Thursday paid a visit to the "Shivalik"-class guided missile frigate, INS Sahyadri (F-49), to learn more about its missile capabilities which include the "BrahMos", the world's fastest supersonic missile.

Army spokesperson Lt. Col. Ramon Zagala, in a statement Friday, said PA officials led by Major Gen. Reynaldo M. Aquino were welcomed by the ship's commanding officer, Captain Ashwin Arvind.

The officials were toured aboard the ship, which was docked at Pier 15, Manila South Harbor, and briefed about the "BrahMos" missile, which can be launched from ship, aircraft, submarine or land.

“The Philippine Army is interested in acquiring this type of missile as it will strengthen our coastal defense operations,” Zagala said.

Earlier this month, the PA activated its first land-based Missile System Battery under the Army Artillery Regiment. The unit is currently working on its training programs before acquiring its future equipment.

“The Philippine Army puts a premium on upgrading the various areas of its defense capabilities as it plays a vital role in addressing external threats. We ensure the Filipino people that we are on a continuous endeavor of becoming a world-class Army ready to protect our country,” he added.

INS Sahyadri (F-49) is accompanied by an anti-submarine corvette, INS Kiltan (P-30), they arrived in the Philippines last October 23 and will be ending their goodwill on the 26th.

INS Sahyadri has a displacement of 6,200 tons, a length of 142.5 meters and a beam of 16.9 meters, and is armed with a variety of missiles, torpedoes, and rockets for anti-ship, anti-air, and anti-submarine missions along with a 76mm automatic cannon.

INS Kiltan, on the other hand, has a displacement of 3,000 tons, a length of 109 meters, a beam of 12.8 meters and is armed with guns, torpedoes, and rockets. (PNA)