Author Topic: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress  (Read 4163 times)

Ayoshi

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Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« on: October 04, 2016, 03:21:34 PM »
Boeing
Quote
Five Decades and Counting

The Boeing B-52H is in its fifth decade of operational service. It primarily provides the United States with immediate nuclear and conventional global strike capability. The B-52H is the most combat capable bomber in the U.S. inventory. Due to its high mission-capable rate, long range, persistence and ability to employ accurate standoff weapons and Joint Direct Attack Munitions, the B-52H continues to be a major contributor to the U.S. and allied forces.

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B-52 Technical Specifications

Primary Function   Heavy bomber
Power plant   8 Pratt & Whitney engines TF33-P-3/103 turbofan
Thrust   Each engine up to 17,000 lbs
Wingspan   185 ft (56.4 m)
Length   159 ft, 4 in (48.5 m)
Height   40 ft, 8 in (12.4 m)
Weight   Approximately 185,000 lbs (83,250 kg)
Max Takeoff Weight   488,000 lbs (219,600 kg)
Fuel Capacity   312,197 lbs
Payload   70,000 lbs (31,500 kg)
Speed   650 mph (Mach 0.86)
Range   8,800 mi (7,652 nautical miles)
Ceiling   50,000 ft (15,150 m)
Crew   5 (aircraft commander, pilot, radar navigator, navigator and electronic warfare officer
Initial operating capability   May 1961 (Current ‘H’ Model)
Armament   Approximately 70,000 lbs (31,500 kg) mixed ordnance -- bombs, smart weapons, mines and missiles. Modified to carry air-launched cruise missiles and Miniature Air Launched Decoy.


Photo taken from nationalinterest.org
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Image credit: U.S. Air Force
« Last Edit: October 02, 2017, 03:44:10 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2016, 03:26:04 PM »
USAF begins receiving new B-52 'smart' weapons bay launchers | IHS Jane's 360 - 14 January 2016
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Six of the US Air Force's (USAF's) 76 B-52Hs are now equipped with the new system, according to the company. The 1760 Internal Weapons Bay Upgrade (IWBU) enhancement modifies an existing Common Strategic Rotary Launcher in the internal weapons bay into a Conventional Rotary Launcher and increases the total number of smart weapons the B-52 can carry and deliver.

The launchers, which can be transferred between aircraft, can carry, target, and launch eight Joint Direct Attack Munitions (JDAMs). Future increments of the launcher are expected to add the capability to carry Joint Air-to-Surface Stand Off Missiles (JASSMs) and Miniature Air Launched Decoys (MALDs).

USAF returns mothballed B-52 bomber to service | IHS Jane's 360 - 03 October 2016
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The US Air Force (USAF) has returned a Boeing B-52H Stratofortress strategic bomber aircraft to service that had been mothballed in the 'boneyard' at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (AFB) in Arizona.

It took approximately 45,000 man-hours to restore 'Ghost Rider' to full operating capability after six years in the boneyard. (US Air Force)
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'Ghost Rider' takes off for Minot Air Force Base, N.D., where it will rejoin the B-52H fleet. After undergoing a nine-month overhaul and upgrade by the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Complex, 61-007 left Tinker Air Force Base on 27 September. (US Air Force)
« Last Edit: October 02, 2017, 03:44:44 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2017, 02:58:51 AM »
USAF B-52H bomber test-launched unarmed AGM-86B nuclear cruise missiles | air recognition - 20 January 2017
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The B-52H aircrews departed Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota, for the Utah Test and Training Range, about 80 miles west of Salt Lake City, and launched the unarmed ALCMs during three separate sorties.

The ALCM is a key air component of the nuclear triad, providing the nation a strategic capability to assure our allies and deter potential adversaries. It provides a clear, visible and tailorable deterrent effect, and denies geographic sanctuaries to potential adversaries.

The AGM-86B is designed to deliver a nuclear payload on target, destroying it on impact. As a standoff weapon, the ALCM can be launched from outside the combat area, allowing aircrews to strike distant targets with a high degree of accuracy without exposing themselves to potentially deadly enemy fire. A B-52H can carry six ALCMs on each of the two externally-mounted pylons and eight internally on a rotary launcher, giving the B-52H a maximum capacity of 20 missiles.

An unarmed AGM-86B Air-Launched Cruise Missile is released from a B-52H Stratofortress Sept. 22, 2014, over the Utah Test and Training Range during a Nuclear Weapons System Evaluation Program sortie (Credit: USAF/Staff Sgt. Roidan)
« Last Edit: October 02, 2017, 03:44:51 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2017, 01:00:45 PM »
USAF B-52 bomber completes first ever leaflet drop tests for PSYOP | Air Recognition - 09 August 2017
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An important part of U.S. military operations overseas is communicating with the local population. This can be done in a number of ways including something as simple as distributing leaflets. In psychological operations, leaflets with messages are often dropped from aircraft in order to reach a wide area.

Testers from the 419th Flight Test Squadron are looking to see if B-52 Stratofortress bombers can accomplish this task.

The squadron recently completed two successful sorties where a B-52 released eight PDU-5/B leaflet bombs over the Point Mugu Sea Test Range and eight more over the Precision Impact Range Area on Edwards Air Force Base.


A frame from a video shows the PDU-5/B leaflet bomb activating and dispersing the leaflets
(Credit: U.S. Air Force)
« Last Edit: October 02, 2017, 03:44:56 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2017, 03:42:30 PM »
From The Aviationist - Sep 28 2017

French C-135FR Tanker Refuels U.S. Air Force B-52 Bomber Over Europe In Rare International Refueling Operation


A French air force KC-135 Stratotanker, refuels a B-52 Stratofortress over Europe Sept. 25, 2017. The Stratofortress is deployed from Barksdale Air Force Base, La., to RAF Fairford, United Kingdom in support of bomber assurance and deterrence operations. U.S. Strategic Command bomber forces regularly conduct combined theater security cooperation engagements with allies and partners, demonstrating the U.S. capability to command, control and conduct bomber missions across the globe. Bomber missions demonstrate the credibility and flexibility of the military’s forces to address today’s complex, dynamic and volatile global security environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Joshua J. Garcia)
« Last Edit: October 02, 2017, 03:45:01 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2017, 03:08:10 PM »
US Air Force: No imminent plans to put B-52s on 24-hour alert | Defense news
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Washington — The U.S. Air Force has no immediate plans to put its nuclear-capable B-52 bombers back on 24-hour alert, although officials have acknowledged the service is making improvements to facilities that could support a change in status should U.S. Strategic Command make that decision.

In an Oct. 22 story, Defense One reported that the Air Force was preparing to put the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress back on 24-alert for the first time ever since 1991. The story, based on an interview with Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein, noted that an alert order had not been given by STRATCOM head Gen. John Hyten.

The report ignited a firestorm of media attention from mainstream publications that interpreted the return to alert status as a foregone conclusion, not as a possibility, and questioned whether this was yet another sign of increasing tension with North Korea.

Ayoshi

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2018, 08:40:01 PM »
USAF looks to quadruple B-52 external weapons load | Janes - 22 June 2018
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According to a request for information (RFI) issued on 21 June, Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) is seeking a new external weapons pylon that will take the B-52’s current 10,000 lb (4,536 kg) maximum external load (across two underwing pylons) to 40,000 lb (18,144 kg).

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The RFI provided no details as to planned costs and timelines for the pylon upgrade, except to say that the total effort from development to fielding should be accomplished between 36 and 72 months. Responses to the RFI are due by 15:00 hrs Central Standard Time on 20 July.

The new pylon would enable the B-52 to carry any of the air-launched munitions in the USAF inventory up to the 22,000 lb Massive Ordnance Air Burst (MOAB) bomb.


One of the B-52's two external pylons seen loaded with MALD-J decoys. The USAF is now looking for a new pylon that will take the current weight limit of 5,000 lb up to 20,000 lb. Source: Raytheon


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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2018, 03:35:32 AM »
The US is sending an unmistakable message to China — four B-52 bomber flights through the East and South China Seas this month
Ryan Pickrell Aug. 30, 2018, 5:21 PM

https://www.businessinsider.com/us-heavy-bombers-are-frequently-tearing-across-chinas-backyard-2018-8

US Air Force B-52H Stratofortress heavy long-range bombers, powerful weapons of war, have made multiple flights through the East and South China Seas this month.

These flights are part of US Indo-Pacific Command's Continuous Bomber Presence mission, which aims to strengthen America's deterrence in the face of emerging threats.

News of these flights comes on the heels of a Pentagon report that China's bombers are increasingly active in the region, often pushing the limits to project power at greater distances.

Several US Air Force B-52H Stratofortress heavy long-range bombers have flown through the contested East and South China Seas multiple times this month, sending an unmistakable message to potential challengers.

Four flights involving no more than two bombers each time were carried out in the disputed seas as part of US Indo-Pacific Command's Continuous Bomber Presence (CBP) mission. Two B-52s assigned to the 96th Expeditionary Bomber Squadron (EBS) participated in joint anti-submarine training exercises with two US Navy P-8 Poseidon aircraft on Aug. 1 in the East China Sea, US Pacific Air Forces (PACAF) said in an official statement.

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Ayoshi

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2018, 01:07:55 AM »
AFA 2018: Boeing believes US Air Force, not company, will select new engines for B-52 | Janes - 16 September 2018
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A Boeing executive believes it is likely the US Air Force (USAF), not the company, will select the new propulsion systems for the service’s lucrative B-52 re-engining effort.

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Boeing, serving as integrator for the effort, is also the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) of the B-52 Stratofortress long-range heavy bomber, an eight-engine aircraft that declared initial operational capability (IOC) in 1952. In addition to GE, Pratt & Whitney, and Rolls-Royce are expected to compete to put new engines on the B-52.

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Integration will also include cockpit upgrades for the engine instruments and throttle system and the interface with the electronic engine controllers between the airframe and the engine controllers themselves.

Ayoshi

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2019, 05:13:09 AM »
Northrop Grumman touts SABR radar for B-52 | Janes - 27 February 2019
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The USAF is looking at several options to satisfy its Radar Modernization Program (RMP) to replace the B-52's now obsolete Northrop Grumman AN/APQ-166 mechanically-scanned radar.

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The service launched the RMP programme for its 76 aircraft bomber fleet in February 2016 (since then one aircraft has crashed, but has been replaced by one returned from storage), with a competition set to be launched this year.

As the incumbent supplier the company has high hopes for its AN/APG-83 system, which is also known as the Scalable Agile Beam Radar (SABR).

Ayoshi

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2019, 09:09:56 AM »
http://defenseph.net/drp/index.php?topic=2236.0

Boeing contracted to integrate LRSO cruise missile with the B-52H bomber | Janes - 15 March 2019
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Under the provisions of the contract, Boeing will undertake aircraft and missile carriage equipment development and modification, and full integration and testing of the LRSO for the USAF fleet of B-52H platforms. The programme is expected to be completed by 31 December 2024.

The Air Force Material Command issued a pre-solicitation notification on 10 April 2018, indicating that it intended to award the aircraft original equipment manufacturer (Boeing) up to USD250 million to integrate the LRSO weapon on the USAF's fleet of 76 B-52H bombers between 1 January 2019 and 31 December 2023 (with provision for an additional year if needed).

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Intended to penetrate and survive integrated air-defence systems and prosecute strategic targets in support of the Air Force's global attack capability and strategic deterrence core function, the LRSO is a developmental, nuclear-capable cruise missile concept that is being proposed as a significantly enhanced replacement for the currently fielded AGM-86 Air-Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM). Both conventional and nuclear variants of the LRSO weapon are required to reach initial operational capability before the retirement of their respective ALCM versions - around 2030.

Ayoshi

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2019, 03:41:03 PM »
https://www.janes.com/article/89840/raytheon-selected-for-b-52-radar-replacement

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Raytheon selected for B-52 radar replacement
12 July 2019

Under the contract, (the value was not disclosed) Raytheon will design, develop, produce, and sustain active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar systems for the USAF's fleet of 77 B-52 bombers (one of which is being reactivated from the 'boneyard' at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base). The radar is based on AESA technologies developed from the AN/APG-79/82 family, though it has not yet been given a designation of its own.

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The USAF looked at several options to satisfy its Radar Modernization Program (RMP) to replace the B-52's now obsolete Northrop Grumman AN/APQ-166 mechanically-scanned radar. Speaking previously to Jane's, a senior USAF official noted, "It's an old radar. It doesn't have the reliability we'd like to have, and if you're flying long-duration missions and you get to a two-digit mean time between failure, it means you're flying around with a broken radar a lot."

These options included the AN/APG-83 AESA system that was being offered by the incumbent radar supplier, Northrop Grumman.

Ayoshi

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2019, 03:37:59 AM »

AN/ASQ-236 Dragon's Eye pod being mounted on a B-52H for testing. USAF

Ayoshi

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2020, 07:43:30 PM »
US Air Force conducts test-launch of AGM-183A hypersonic weapon from B-52 bomber | Air Recognition - 12 August 2020


A B-52H Stratofortress assigned to the 419th Flight Test Squadron is undergone pre-flight procedures at Edwards Air Force Base, California, Aug. 8. The aircraft conducted a captive-carry flight test of the AGM-183A Air-launched Rapid Response Weapon Instrumented Measurement Vehicle 2 at the Point Mugu Sea Range off the Southern California coast. (U.S. Air Force photo by Giancarlo Casem)