Author Topic: How to (start) building a corvette-based or OPV-based fleet in 5 years  (Read 17215 times)

adroth

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Re: How to (start) building a corvette-based or OPV-based fleet in 5 years
« Reply #45 on: November 21, 2017, 07:44:43 AM »
Even more food for thought

Shared Modular Build of Warships
How a Shared Build Can Support Future Shipbuilding
by Laurence Smallman, Hanlin Tang, John F. Schank, Stephanie Pezard
Related Topics: Military Acquisition and Procurement, Military Ships and Naval Vessels

https://www.rand.org/pubs/technical_reports/TR852.html

Some recent shipbuilding programs in the United States and Europe have involved multiple shipyards constructing major modules of each ship for final integration and testing at one shipyard. Most modern shipyards have the capability to build and integrate modules, whether those modules originate at that shipyard or at another. Some yards might need to modify their facilities, however, to handle large blocks, rather than completed vessels, at the waterfront. Shared build might not maintain skills at all shipyards equally, but it might help maintain skills at multiple shipyards.

It requires the cooperating shipyards to set aside any competitive tendencies and help each other to the overall benefit of the program.

Potential benefits include maximizing the learning curve, cross-yard learning, and outsourcing benefits. The Navy needs to decide what it wants from a shared-build strategy, then monitor and manage the program to ensure that it delivers the required outcome, as well as the vessels called for in the program.

adroth

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With the Frigate project now firmly underway . . . this thought exercise is now more relevant than ever.

Hyundai Heavy Industries to start construction of PH Navy’s frigate
By: Frances G. Mangosing - @inquirerdotnet INQUIRER.net / 07:39 PM
May 01, 2018


South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries will finally start the construction of the Philippine Navy’s first missile-capable frigate, one of the country’s biggest military modernization projects worth P18 billion.

The steel-cutting ceremony was held on Monday at the company’s headquarters in Ulsan, South Korea’s state media Yonhap News reported.

< Edited >

Read more: http://globalnation.inquirer.net/166416/hyundai-heavy-industries-start-construction-ph-navys-frigate#ixzz5EGFi57FR
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook


=====

Milestone     Description     Details
           
Critical Design Review     Approval and submission of Plan and Detail Design for the project

Purchase order of steel / major equipment
     Completed March 23, 2018 under Commodore Alberto Carlos. See here.

Original schedule: 10 months after issuance of NTP


               
Steel Cutting Frigate 1     At least 50% of the steel for Frigate 1 received / available on site of builder

Cutting of steel required for two blocks of Frigate 1 completed
     May 1, 2018.

               
Steel Cutting Frigate 2        At least 50% of the steel for Frigate 2 received / available on site of builder

Cutting of steel required for two blocks of Frigate 2 completed. ETA September. Three months ahead of the original six months schedule.
        n/a

Original schedule: 18 months after issuance of NTP, 6 months from Steel cutting of Frigate #1


               
Keel Laying Frigate 1        Completion of at least two blocks of Frigate 1

Delivery of major equipment identified during design review
        n/a

Original schedule: 20 months after issuance of NTP



=====



adroth

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Prospects for local builds were discussed in the thread that focused on domestic-production provisions in the Frigate project

http://defenseph.net/drp/index.php?topic=3276.0

However . . . there are very real impediments to local construction. See Putting the "Philippines as the #4 largest shipbuilder" label into perspective.

However, while these may be a challenge for frigate-sized projects. Perhaps that would not be the case for smaller, Pohang-sized vessels.

The support facilities that Korea is helping the PH build up could very well be the key

http://defenseph.net/drp/index.php?topic=3392.0
« Last Edit: May 03, 2018, 04:04:52 PM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: How to (start) building a corvette-based or OPV-based fleet in 5 years
« Reply #48 on: August 23, 2019, 03:40:08 PM »
https://globalnation.inquirer.net/179257/philippines-to-buy-two-new-corvettes-from-south-korea

Quote
Philippines to buy two new corvettes from South Korea
Inquirer.net / 11:58 AM August 23, 2019

At a proposed budget of P14 billion each, the corvettes would be more expensive than the anticipated missile-capable warships.

The scheme of procurement to acquire the corvettes would likely be government-to-government (G2G).

“The Philippine Navy recommends a G2G mode. We are still going through the procurement process,” Lorenzana said. 

Duterte approved the corvette acquisition program (CAP) a few months ago, according to a memo from the Office of the President dated May 10, 2019.

The Navy presented the CAP during a command conference in Malacańang on May 7, “based on the unsolicited proposal of HHI,” read the document seen by Inquirer.net.

“The President approved the Philippine Navy’s recommendation to prioritize the acquisition of two Philippine Navy corvettes under G2G procurement with Republic of Korea, subject to compliance with relevant laws, rules and regulations,” the memo read.

The Armed Forces of the Philippines has already sent a request for the funds for the two corvettes in early August thru the Department of National Defense.

The ships will be paid through multi-year obligation authority, outside the annual funds from the AFP modernization program.