Author Topic: BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151)- [Frigate #2 (P160)]  (Read 24991 times)

adroth

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Re: LOOK: Inside the CMS test site for Philippine Navy frigates
« Reply #15 on: May 26, 2019, 02:01:22 AM »


Manila-based reporters were given a chance to have a quick look at the integrated combat management systems’ test site for BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151). (Photo by FRANCES MANGOSING / INQUIRER.net)



The combat management system (CMS) is considered the “brains” of warships. (Photo by FRANCES MANGOSING / INQUIRER.net)





Inside the integrated combat management systems’ test site for BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151). (Photo by FRANCES MANGOSING / INQUIRER.net)



Hanwha Systems senior manager of overseas business support team Sam Soo Kim said they had developed an exclusive tactical data link system called “Link P” for the two frigates of the Philippine Navy being built by HHI. This can communicate with other similar tactical data link systems and has a 32-digit key code encryption to ensure data security. (Photo by FRANCES MANGOSING / INQUIRER.net)



“Normally the password has 10 digits. Hacking of this password takes millions of years. That’s the theory. Thirty-two digits is a very long password,” says Sam Soo Kim, Hanwha Systems senior manager of the overseas business support team. (Photo by FRANCES MANGOSING / INQUIRER.net)

Read more: https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1123230/look-inside-the-cms-test-site-for-philippine-navy-frigates#ixzz5oxdhye16
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adroth

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Manila-based reporters were given a chance to have a quick look at the integrated combat management systems’ test site for BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151). (Photo by FRANCES MANGOSING / INQUIRER.net)



The combat management system (CMS) is considered the “brains” of warships. (Photo by FRANCES MANGOSING / INQUIRER.net)





Inside the integrated combat management systems’ test site for BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151). (Photo by FRANCES MANGOSING / INQUIRER.net)



Hanwha Systems senior manager of overseas business support team Sam Soo Kim said they had developed an exclusive tactical data link system called “Link P” for the two frigates of the Philippine Navy being built by HHI. This can communicate with other similar tactical data link systems and has a 32-digit key code encryption to ensure data security. (Photo by FRANCES MANGOSING / INQUIRER.net)



“Normally the password has 10 digits. Hacking of this password takes millions of years. That’s the theory. Thirty-two digits is a very long password,” says Sam Soo Kim, Hanwha Systems senior manager of the overseas business support team. (Photo by FRANCES MANGOSING / INQUIRER.net)

Read more: https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1123230/look-inside-the-cms-test-site-for-philippine-navy-frigates#ixzz5oxdhye16
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Buster1123

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Re: LOOK: Inside the CMS test site for Philippine Navy frigates
« Reply #17 on: May 26, 2019, 10:42:50 AM »
I find it really funny that people (the same familiar yellowtard personalities) are still whining about "CMS and Link 16 issue" in social media, when all their points and concerns had already been answered/addressed before, still whining as if they are the ones who will be operating these frigates. If there really were illegalities, just file a case in the court already and quit all the BS in the social media.

grail

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Re: LOOK: Inside the CMS test site for Philippine Navy frigates
« Reply #18 on: May 26, 2019, 10:54:42 AM »
I find it really funny that people (the same familiar yellowtard personalities) are still whining about "CMS and Link 16 issue" in social media, when all their points and concerns had already been answered/addressed before, still whining as if they are the ones who will be operating these frigates. If there really were illegalities, just file a case in the court already and quit all the BS in the social media.

True. There is no legal basis to cancel the contract based on their personal preference, otherwise this project would have been cancelled already.

adroth

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Re: BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151)- [Frigate #2 (P160)]
« Reply #19 on: May 26, 2019, 04:18:24 PM »
BRP Jose Rizal, BRP Antonio Luna first real combat ships for PH
By Priam Nepomuceno  May 21, 2019, 9:13 am

https://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1070312

SEOUL -- The missile-armed frigate BRP Jose Rizal (FF-150), which is scheduled to be launched at the shipyard of Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) in South Korea's southeastern city of Ulsan on Thursday, is the first combat vessel to be designed and purposely acquired for the Philippine Navy (PN), whose fleet is mostly composed of second-hand ships acquired from allies.

"She (BRP Jose Rizal) is the first combat ship to be designed and acquired for the PN along with her sister-ship, the BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151) whose steel-cutting is also scheduled for this week," said Navy spokesperson Captain Jonathan Zata in an interview with the Philippine News Agency late Monday.

Launching is considered the four highlights of a vessel's life with the other three being keel-laying, commissioning, and decommissioning while steel-cutting is considered the formal start of a ship's construction.

The two ships will be armed with a variety of sensors and weapons capable of detecting and neutralizing surface, sub-surface and air threats.

Once the two ships are commissioned into PN service by 2020 and 2021, Zata said these will help secure the country's maritime chokepoints or primary sea routes used for trade, logistics, and naval operations from the above-mentioned threats.

The Philippines and HHI signed a PHP16 billion contract for two missile-armed frigates, with another PHP2 billion set aside for its weapon systems and munition.

Also, Zata said the two ships will become more capable once the two AgustaWestland AW-159 anti-submarine helicopters are integrated into operations.

This is because the AW-159s will extend the range of the ships in detecting and neutralizing surface and sub-surface threats, he added.

This is possible because of the helicopters heavy missile and torpedo weaponry and its various surveillance detections including sonar for submarine location and hunting.

The two AW-159s are expected to be commissioned into PN service by May 27, which coincides with the Navy's 121st anniversary.

These aircraft were acquired for PHP5.4 billion including its munition, mission essential equipment and integrated logistic support.

The AW-159 (previously called the Future Lynx and Lynx Wildcat) is an improved version of the Westland Super Lynx military helicopter.

The helicopter has been ordered for the Royal Navy and British Army.

It is capable of speeds of 291 km/h (181 mph), range of 777 km (483 miles), ferry range of 963 km (598 miles) and an endurance of one and a-half hours (fours hours and 30 minutes if fitted with auxiliary fuel).

The AW-159 can also be armed with rockets, machine guns, missiles, torpedoes and depth charges. (PNA)

LionFlyer

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Re: LOOK: Inside the CMS test site for Philippine Navy frigates
« Reply #20 on: May 26, 2019, 08:09:41 PM »
Still, a pertinent issue remains. Why is the supposed reason for the delay a dependency on ROK's requirement? I would have thought PN paid for TDL support, regardless of ROK and they could have got ahead as a separate, PN specific version of ICMS release.

As for project delays, meh. I have sat on both sides the fence.. haven't seen any major system integration projects not gotten delayed. As long as both parties understand why and come to a mutually agreed accomodation, projects will move ahead.

maverick2007

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Re: LOOK: Inside the CMS test site for Philippine Navy frigates
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2019, 07:50:43 PM »
I find it really funny that people (the same familiar yellowtard personalities) are still whining about "CMS and Link 16 issue" in social media, when all their points and concerns had already been answered/addressed before, still whining as if they are the ones who will be operating these frigates. If there really were illegalities, just file a case in the court already and quit all the BS in the social media.

True. There is no legal basis to cancel the contract based on their personal preference, otherwise this project would have been cancelled already.

I really hate that guy name max , he's insinuator and instigator by feeding his supporter with raw data.

adroth

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Re: LOOK: Inside the CMS test site for Philippine Navy frigates
« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2019, 05:45:42 AM »
Folks, make no mistake, the CMS acquisition was a clusterf*ck.

It was the first time that the PN had ever mounted a project that complicated -- and they waited to bring a consultant onboard AFTER the started the project. It also didn't help that PN Modernization Office, which had been responsible for managing the TWG to make sure they were doing their jobs right, was dissolved before the Frigate Acquisition Project.

Mis-steps were inevitable. It's a miracle that the project actually move ahead at all. If anything, it is a testament to the powers that be to get things done despite controversy.

That being said, there are two undeniable facts that people aren't getting . . . but really should:

- The CMS on the Jose Rizal class ships are the most sophisticated systems ever installed on a Philippine Navy vessel in the service's 121-year history. Period.

- Because of the imported nature of the two CMS candidates, there was a sales representative that got their commission, and another that didn't.

A lot of the comparisons about which systems are better than the other is -- ultimately -- debatable. But dwell the second bullet point a bit, and then take this into consideration:

http://defenseph.net/drp/index.php?topic=2499.0
« Last Edit: May 30, 2019, 07:40:05 AM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: LOOK: Inside the CMS test site for Philippine Navy frigates
« Reply #23 on: May 30, 2019, 02:11:24 PM »
ABS-CBN News
Published on May 22, 2019
Nilinaw ng Hyundai na hindi sila dumaan sa padrino para makuha ang P18 bilyon frigate contract ng Philippine Navy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=a-ubIbu1k7U











« Last Edit: May 30, 2019, 02:34:54 PM by adroth »

grail

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Re: LOOK: Inside the CMS test site for Philippine Navy frigates
« Reply #24 on: May 30, 2019, 03:19:28 PM »
Folks, make no mistake, the CMS acquisition was a clusterf*ck.

It was the first time that the PN had ever mounted a project that complicated -- and they waited to bring a consultant onboard AFTER the started the project. It also didn't help that PN Modernization Office, which had been responsible for managing the TWG to make sure they were doing their jobs right, was dissolved before the Frigate Acquisition Project.

Mis-steps were inevitable. It's a miracle that the project actually move ahead at all. If anything, it is a testament to the powers that be to get things done despite controversy.

That being said, there are two undeniable facts that people aren't getting . . . but really should:

- The CMS on the Jose Rizal class ships are the most sophisticated systems ever installed on a Philippine Navy vessel in the service's 121-year history. Period.

- Because of the imported nature of the two CMS candidates, there was a sales representative that got their commission, and another that didn't.

A lot of the comparisons about which systems are better than the other is -- ultimately -- debatable. But dwell the second bullet point a bit, and then take this into consideration:

http://defenseph.net/drp/index.php?topic=2499.0

yes it was a clusterf.... however "legally speaking" all the equipment and systems in place complies with the minimum technical specifications set, so we can whine all we want but there is no basis for us to cancel the contract just because we did not get the exact equipment that we wished for. The current admin has no choice but to accept the frigate and remove those causing the delay on our side.

adroth

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Re: LOOK: Inside the CMS test site for Philippine Navy frigates
« Reply #25 on: May 31, 2019, 05:41:51 AM »
Time-to-delivery was essential. The administration is keenly aware that it can only "buy time" for so long before it actually needs to show its teeth. The Frigates are part of that. The project was what it was when it got it . . . so it ran with it.

Even if was legal basis for cancellation . . . could we really afford to delay it further . . . and hope that the next administration doesn't change its mind for one reason or another?

===

It'll be interesting to see if the South Korean DAPA lets us get skin in the game and allow us to make our indigenous CMS based on what we now have:

http://defenseph.net/drp/index.php?topic=3035.0
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 05:54:44 AM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: LOOK: Inside the CMS test site for Philippine Navy frigates
« Reply #26 on: May 31, 2019, 06:09:38 AM »
I find it really funny that people (the same familiar yellowtard personalities) are still whining about "CMS and Link 16 issue" in social media, when all their points and concerns had already been answered/addressed before, still whining as if they are the ones who will be operating these frigates. If there really were illegalities, just file a case in the court already and quit all the BS in the social media.

Controversy is always good for newspapers and meme generation. When people don't read the specs, it's easy to fall for memes, especially when looking to justify preconceived notions about people in power rather than looking for facts.

Consider this

Empedrad said the TDL 16 compatibility for the Philippine frigates would require a different procurement activity for the government.

“TDL is not part of the contract. Wala naman nakalagay. It is provided with space but not (supplied) with. Pag binili yun, pwede agad isalpak,” he said.

< Edited >

Empedrad, for all of the reported unpopularity of the man in real life, is correct as he was referring to this

Administrator's note: See also Frigate Acquisition Project thread index for this, and other, sub-systems

=====


PN requirements as per SBB# PN-FAP-16-01



At the end of the day, South Korea -- alone -- can't integrate Link16 with our ships as the US needs to involved in the installation. It's a US-led data-sharing system so they have final say on who gets on, and HOW things get on their system.

"Hanwha still has to develop a Link-16 system..."

Dead giveaway that even the good admiral has been misinformed about TADIL(now just TDL) Link-16. The Koreans need not develop a Link-16 hardware component because it isn't there's to develop, they are not allowed to. Link-16 networks are controlled entirely by the US-based MIDS International Program Office, an office in the Pentagon controlled by the USN and a French officer typically, well... them and the original partner NATO countries.

The program office controls ALL work. Literally ALL WORK.

For example: When the PAF wanted to interface with Link-16, they asked for permission from the office and sent them a requirement for MIDS LVT hardware to be installed into the FA-50s. The IPO worked the request, and got approval from the partner nations on our behalf. They then drafted our requirements into an RFI and got quotes, then picked a contractor for us. The work is stamped a form of high-security FMS, with very specific conditions and restrictions.

The program office chosen contractor then flew to Korea to install the datalink kit into our FA-50s, with some assistance from DAPA and KAI.

Literally at no point in the decision making or hardware process were the Koreans or the Philippines ever involved. None. We were just there to receive the airplanes with the radios and terminals already installed. This is what I've been trying to get everyone to understand.

Naval Shield DOES NOT MATTER, because the Koreans do not have direct access to the TDL hardware... like Canada, Australia, Japan, UAE, Saudi Arabia... the list goes on of richer, more technologically capable countries who are simply at the mercy of the Program Office.

In the case of the Philippines, JUSMAG needs to get onboard. The same would have been true even if Tacticos got the contract.

https://defenseph.net/drp/index.php?topic=277.0
« Last Edit: May 31, 2019, 06:25:26 AM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151)- [Frigate #2 (P160)]
« Reply #27 on: June 07, 2019, 01:53:56 PM »
Korean shipbuilder eyes April 2020 delivery of BRP Jose Rizal – Navy chief
By: Frances Mangosing - Reporter / @FMangosingINQ INQUIRER.net / 10:19 AM June 06, 2019

MANILA, Philippines — The Philippine Navy’s first missile-capable frigate, the future BRP Jose Rizal (FF-150), could be delivered by April 2020.

In an interview aired on ABS CBN News Channel on Wednesday night, Flag Officer in Command Vice Admiral Robert Empedrad said the Korean shipbuilder of the Philippine Navy frigates, Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI), has intentions to deliver it months ahead of the previously announced target date September 2020.

< Edited >

The second frigate, BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151), is expected to be delivered by March 2021.

Empedrad said the BRP Jose Rizal will sail to Subic Bay on reaching the Philippines from South Korea. Navy personnel would be part of the crew but they would not be the ones to sail it to the Philippines.

“We will send our personnel there to train but based on the contract, the delivery of the ship is in Subic Bay. Ang mag-sail ng barko ay hindi Navy. We will have our crew as part of the sailing crew but they will not sail the ship back to the Philippines,” he said.

< Edited >

Read more: https://globalnation.inquirer.net/175998/korean-shipbuilder-eyes-april-2020-delivery-of-brp-jose-rizal-navy-chief#ixzz5q8fpunwV
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Ayoshi

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Re: BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151)- [Frigate #2 (P160)]
« Reply #28 on: August 31, 2019, 02:41:10 AM »
https://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1078985

Quote
PH's 2nd missile frigate launch set in November
August 29, 2019, 11:03 am

The launching ceremonies will take place at the Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) shipyard in Ulsan, South Korea.

The BRP Jose Rizal, the country's first missile frigate, was launched at the same facility last May 23.

The first missile frigate is expected to be delivered to the PN by April 2020 while the BRP Antonio Luna is scheduled for September of the same year.

The Philippines and HHI signed a PHP16-billion contract for two missile-armed frigates with another PHP2 billion set aside for its weapon systems and munition.

adroth

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Re: BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151)- [Frigate #2 (P160)]
« Reply #29 on: November 08, 2019, 03:04:32 PM »
https://mobile.twitter.com/FMangosingINQ/status/1192682555272658944

Today in Ulsan, South Korea: Ship launch for PH Navy’s second missile-capable frigate BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151) at Hyundai Heavy Industries shipyard. Defense Sec. Lorenzana, top defense and Navy officers were in attendance. A guest at the event shared these photos to Inquirer.