Author Topic: Manila's Botched Hostage Crisis (2010)  (Read 1154 times)

adroth

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Manila's Botched Hostage Crisis (2010)
« on: January 15, 2019, 05:39:24 AM »
The Aftermath of Manila's Botched Hostage Crisis
By Emily Rauhala / Manila    Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2010
 
Ted Aljibe / AFP / Getty Images

http://content.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,2013609,00.html

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Then, an ex-police inspector stepped on to a tourist bus with an M16 rifle.

At 10:00 a.m. on Monday morning, Rolando D. Mendoza commandeered a bus carrying Hong Kong tourists in downtown Manila. Mendoza was reportedly furious about his dismissal on corruption charges and demanded redress, at gunpoint. As the standoff progressed, television crews swarmed the scene and Manileños gathered in restaurants and shops to follow live footage. Many were still watching, hours later, when shots rang out, SWAT teams moved in and gunfire swallowed the vehicle. Mendoza killed eight people before the police managed to shoot him dead. Another victim later died in a hospital.

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Hong Kong, for one, is outraged. "Fury in HK Over Manila Bloodbath," read a headline in the city's English-language daily, the South China Morning Post. The city, a semi-autonomous sliver of southern China, issued a travel warning and urged its residents to leave the the Philippines at once. Donald Tsang, the territory's chief executive, spoke with unusual candor on the matter: "The way it was handled — particularly the outcome — was very disappointing," he said. The Philippine consulate, meanwhile, was swamped by protesters bearing placards and petitions. Online, the tone was vicious: "SWAT = Sorry We Aren't Trained," was a common refrain.

In addition to Hong Kong and China, several other governments have issued travel warnings for the Philippines. And, though there has been no threat of trade sanctions, some businesses are bracing for a backlash. "I'm just waiting for it," said Joseph Rubio, a Filipino who does business in China. Aquino, the optimist, urged calm. "We should not just give up because of this one incident," he said.

Manila — and, indeed the country — is now engaged in a high-stakes blame game centered, primarily, on the police, the press and the President himself. The only consensus, so far, is that security forces botched the rescue. Gunshots were heard at 6:40 p.m. on Monday, but the SWAT team did not storm the bus until after 7:30 p.m. "How could it take them so long?" asked Mike Santos, 50, a customs broker. So far, four members of the SWAT team have been sacked and the head of Manila's police department is on voluntary leave pending an investigation.

The media have come in for blame as well. Footage from the standoff may have helped the gunman figure out what the police and the hostage negotiators were up to: he was reportedly watching himself and the would-be rescuers on the bus's onboard TV. He then supposedly started firing when he saw his brother being escorted from the scene. In light of the criticism, President Aquino said he may consider new "limitations" on the media. His office admitted, too, that there were "defects" in the handling of the crisis. These concessions, though, did not earn him absolution. He's been roundly criticized, at home and abroad, for his lack of visibility during the crisis.

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adroth

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Re: Manila's Botched Hostage Crisis (2010)
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2019, 07:30:51 AM »
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adroth

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Re: Manila's Botched Hostage Crisis (2010)
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2019, 07:31:03 AM »
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adroth

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Re: Manila's Botched Hostage Crisis (2010)
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2019, 07:33:17 AM »
President Duterte apologizes for Manila hostage crisis
April 13, 2018

https://pcoo.gov.ph/news_releases/president-duterte-apologizes-for-manila-hostage-crisis/
 
Hong Kong — President Rodrigo Roa Duterte on Thursday, April 12, apologized to the Chinese for the hostage-taking incident in Manila in 2010 that left eight tourists dead.

“May I address myself to the Chinese people who are here, who are with us, who joined us. From the bottom of my heart, as the President of the Republic of the Philippines and in behalf of the people of the Philippines, may I apologize formally to you now,” he said in his speech during his meeting with the Filipino community here.

The Chief Executive said both the government and the people of China have always wanted for an apology.

Duterte further noted that no official apologies from the Philippines have been made.

The President also assured the Chinese that the incident would not happen again.

“We are sorry that the incident happened and as humanly possible, I would like to make this guarantee also that it will never, never happen again,” he said.

The President’s working visit here was capped by a meeting with more than 2,000 members of the Filipino community at the Kai Tak Cruise Terminal in Kowloon.

Duterte told the Filipinos here to stop worrying about the Philippines, as he cited the drop in illegal drugs and terrorism cases.

“We are safe. We are good,” he said.

“Palagay ko naman there has been a lessening use of drugs, criminality, terrorism, and all,” he added.

In addition, Duterte said his administration is pursuing graft and corruption relentlessly.

“Basta we’re doing all right except for a few who are undermining the government,” he said.

President Duterte underscored in his speech that the Philippines has so many favors to thank China for.

“I’d like to thank people and the government of China for being so good to us,” he said.

He also reminded Filipinos to respect China.

“All I ask is that we just follow the rules,” he said.

There are around 222,000 Filipinos in Hong Kong.

Meanwhile, President Duterte announced that he would witness the signing of the Philippines’ deal with the Kuwaiti government, which aims to protect the welfare of overseas Filipinos workers (OFWs) in Kuwait.

“I think that to give honor also to the Kuwait government, I will go there for the signing just to witness it,” he said.

The President discussed the demands set by the Philippine government, such as OFWs should have a day off once a week; there should be no confiscation of passports and cellphones; and that they should be allowed to cook their own food. PND