Author Topic: LVTP-7 / AAV-7 / AAVP-7A1 Amphibious Assault Vehicle  (Read 1327 times)

Ayoshi

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LVTP-7 / AAV-7 / AAVP-7A1 Amphibious Assault Vehicle
« on: September 01, 2017, 11:47:31 AM »
From: fas.org
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The LVTP7, which entered the Marine Corps inventory in the early 1970s, was a quantum improvement over the short-ranged LVTP5 of the Vietnam era. Weighing in at 26 tons (23,991 kg) combat-loaded, and with a three-man crew, it can carry 25 Marines. With a road speed of 45 mph (72 km/h), it is also fully amphibious with water speeds up to 8 mph (13 km/h). It is not as heavily armed or armored as the Army's Bradley infantry fighting vehicle; on the other hand, the M2A1 Bradley carries only seven troop passengers. In 1985 the Marine Corps changed the designation of the LVTP7Al to AAV7Al -- amphibious assault vehicle -- representing a shift in emphasis away from the long-time LVT designation, meaning "landing vehicle, tracked." Without a change of a bolt or plate, the AAV7Al was to be more of an armored personnel carrier and less of a landing vehicle.
The AAVP7A1 is an armored assault amphibious full-tracked landing vehicle. The vehicle carries troops in water operations from ship to shore, through rough water and surf zone. It also carries troops to inland objectives after ashore. The amphibious capability of the AAV makes it unique among all DOD systems. This forcible entry amphibious capability is the unique capability that sets the Marine Corps apart from the other services. A portion [64%] of the AAV fleet will undergo a reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) upgrade, and a rebuild to standard (RS) retrofit, to ensure Marine AAVs remain maintainable until the arrival of the Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAAV).

The primary responsibility of the AAVs during an amphibious operation is to spearhead a beach assault. They disembark from ship and come ashore, carrying infantry and supplies to the area to provide a forced entry into the amphibious assault area for the surface assault element. Once the AAVs have landed, they can take on several different tasks: manning check points, Military Operations in Urban Terrain (MOUT) missions, escorting food convoys or mechanized patrol. The standard AAV comes equipped with a MK-19 grenade launcher and a M2 .50 caliber machine gun. With a 10,000 pound capacity, the AAV can also be used as a bulk refueler or a field expedient ambulance. It is easily the most versatile vehicle in the Marine Corps.

From: military-today.com

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The Amphibious Assault Vehicle, usually known as the AAV7 was once called LVTP7 by the US Marine Corps and other users. It is a bulky amphibious tracked vehicle intended to land troops on open beaches so it has to be seaworthy and is thus scaled accordingly.

   Intended as a replacement for the LVTP5 series the LVTP7 prototype appeared in 1967 with production commencing during 1970-1971. In 1985 it was renamed the AAV7. By the time production has ceased over 1 500 had been produced not only for the US Marines but also for seven export customers, including Argentina, Brazil, Italy, South Korea, Spain and Thailand.

   It has a crew of three, including commander, gunner and driver. The capacious troop compartment of the AAV7 can hold up to 25 marines or 4.5 tonnes of supplies. Troops are seated on benches. Entry and exit being via a large rear-mounted ramp or roof hatches.

   The AAV7 is launched at sea from amphibious assault ships. This armored vehicle is self-deploying. It is intended for a forced entry into the semi-aquatic areas. The main mission of the vehicles during an amphibious assault is to spearhead a beach and to secure coastline for ongoing troops. Once ashore functions of the AAV7 include guarding checkpoints, patrolling and carrying troops and supplies inland.

From: Army Recognition

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Variants:
- LVTP-7: original serie produced since 1971
- LVTP-7A1: LVTP-7 Service Life Extension Program. Renamed to AAVP-7A1 from 1984.
- AAV-7: LVTP-7 renamed in 1984
- AAV-7A1:LVTP-7A1 Renamed from 1984
- AAVP-7A1 (Personnel): Armored Personnel Carrier variant of AAV-7A1
- AAVC-7A1 (Command): Command, Control and Communications variant of AAV-7A1
- AAVR-7A1 (Recovery): Wrecker variant of AAV-7A1 including a hydraulic telescoping crane with 2,721kg capacity and a 13,605kg capacity recovery winch.
- AAV-7A1 RAM/RS (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability/Rebuild to Standard): replacement of both the engine and suspension with US Army M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicle components modified for the AAV


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Photos taken from fas.org

« Last Edit: March 17, 2019, 03:37:33 PM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: AAV7 - Amphibious armored personnel carrier
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2017, 11:49:41 AM »
US Marine corps approved a low-rate initial production of the Amphibious Assault Vehicle Survivability Upgrade program | Army Recognition - 31 August 2017
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The Marine Corps approved the Amphibious Assault Vehicle Survivability Upgrade (AAV-SU) program to begin low-rate initial production (LRIP), with the program executive officer for land systems signing a Milestone C decision on Aug. 17 and the program manager awarding SAIC funding for 21 vehicles Tuesday, Advanced Amphibious Assault Program Manager Col. Wendell Leimbach told USNI News.

< snipped >

Developmental testing took place at Aberdeen Test Center in Maryland and the Amphibious Vehicle Test Branch (AVTB) at Camp Pendleton, and the operational assessment took place at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms and AVTB. Throughout the testing, which wrapped up in June, the program office learned a lot of lessons that were fed back into the design. For example, Leimbach said, adding new survivability features into a fixed vehicle hull size “constrained the internal volume” of the vehicle. The award to SAIC includes funding to overhaul 18 personnel-variant vehicles and three command and control-variant vehicles. The Marine Corps originally planned to only upgrade the personnel-variant vehicles but has since decided to include a few dozen command and control vehicles as well.

Ayoshi

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Re: AAV7 - Amphibious armored personnel carrier
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2017, 11:51:35 AM »
AAV-SU
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The Assault Amphibian Vehicle Survivability Upgrade by SAIC.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwiZbZGZaqI


Assault Amphibious Vehicle Survivability Upgrade Program (AAV SUP)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKlgq3RDu74

Ayoshi

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Re: AAV7 - amphibious assault vehicle
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2017, 09:37:13 PM »
USMC’s AAV7, ACV programmes trade capacity, terrain capability for survivability | Jane's 360 - 15 November 2017
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The US Marine Corps’ (USMC’s) two-pronged amphibious vehicle modernisation effort will include some significant survivability upgrades to its legacy AAV7 amphibious assault vehicles, and be complemented with a new personnel carrier with mine resistant ambush protected (MRAP)-levels of protection.

< snipped >

Indeed, the AAV7A2 plans to upgrade four battalions-worth of vehicles with additional belly armour, integrated buoyant armour, blast attenuated seats, and an external armoured fuel tank, improving the vehicle’s underbelly blast survivability to approximately half that of a MRAP-type vehicle, according to Maj Commander.


The AAV-SU programme aims to modernise the AAVs that have been in operation for more than 40 years. Source: USMC/Taylor Cooper

Ayoshi

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Re: AAV7 - amphibious assault vehicle
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2018, 11:08:29 PM »
USMC seeks improved AAV tracks | Janes - 03 May 2018
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Vehicles updated to the AAV-SU standard feature improved resistance against mine and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) with newly added underbody protection. However, this has introduced additional weight that is only partially offset by buoyant ceramic armour on the flanks.

Potential IAT approaches include the replacement of existing tracks made of steel integrated with rubber track pads with rubber-band tracks.

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Re: AAV7 - amphibious assault vehicle
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2018, 05:43:45 AM »
Brazil receives last AAV7A1 RAM/RS armoured amphibious vehicle | Janes - 20 September 2018
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The AAVP7A1 RAM/RS personnel carrier variant was airlifted from the United States to Rio de Janeiro in a US Air Force C-17 Globemaster III transport aircraft.

In 2015 BAE Systems was awarded a USD82 million US Foreign Military Sales (FMS) contract to produce 23 AAV7A1 RAM/RS vehicles by modernising and converting 23 former US Marine Corps AAV7A1s. The vehicles comprise 20 AAVP7A1 RAM/RS personnel carriers, two AAVC7A1 RAM/RS command post vehicles, and one AAVR7A1 RAM/RS recovery vehicle.


The Brazilian Navy has significantly boosted its amphibious assault capabilities with the receipt of 23 AAV7A1 RAM/RS vehicles (AAVC7A1 RAM/RS command post vehicle shown), the last of which arrived in Brazil on 17 September. (Victor Barreira)

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Re: LVTP-7 / AAV-7 / AAVP-7A1 Amphibious Assault Vehicle
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2019, 03:39:56 PM »
Spain could purchase eight AAVP-7A1 Amphibious Armored Vehicles from U.S. | Army Recognition - 16 March 2019 16:33
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The Government of Spain has requested to buy eight (8) Assault Amphibious Vehicles, Personnel (AAVP-7A1) Reliability, Availability, Maintainability/Rebuilt to Standard (RAM/RS); two (2) Assault Amphibious Vehicles, Command (AAVC-7A1) Reliability, Availability, Maintainability/Rebuilt to Standard (RAM/RS); and one (1) Assault Amphibious Vehicle, Recovery (AAVR-7A1) Reliability, Availability, Maintainability/Rebuilt to Standard (RAM/RS).

Also included are Enhanced Armor Applique Kits (EAAK), spare and repair parts, tools and test equipment, technical data and publications, training and training material, U.S. Government and contractor technical and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistics and program support. The total estimated program cost is $107 million.


U.S. Marines with 2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion (2d AABN), 2nd Marine Division (2d MARDIV), conduct an amphibious movement aboard an AAV-7A1 Assault Amphibious Vehicle during the unit's Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation (MCCRE) on Camp Lejeune, N.C., March 12, 2018. (Picture source U.S. DoD)