Author Topic: Technology Entrepreneur: Diosdado Bantato  (Read 1598 times)

adroth

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Technology Entrepreneur: Diosdado Bantato
« on: August 27, 2017, 04:54:05 PM »
From: http://www.philstar.com/sunday-life/812977/where-world-dado-banatao

In person, he is an extremely simple man, unassuming, clad in a basic button-down polo and dark trousers. With how low key he is, you would hardly be able to tell that he is a billionaire visionary based in Silicon Valley. He shies away and politely begs off talking about net worth and material assets, and instead lights up and laughs a lot when talking about his work. He is responsible for consumerizing a specific technology used exclusively back then by the US military, and today, we have it on our phones and cars and we call it GPS. According to MorphLabs CEO and co-founder Winston Damarillo, 30 percent of every computer and laptop in existence carries technology and ideas developed by this man.

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After 10 years as an employee, he started his own companies that did very well, and eventually ended up selling some, reportedly one for a $430 million and another for over a billion dollars.

Dado went from individual contributor to first level manager to manager of an entire operation in his early years as an employee in Silicon Valley. “Those are all confidence building events that made me think I can do really challenging things and deliver the product. I think most entrepreneurs go through that process,” he shares.

His first start up company, Mostron, was put up with $500,000 pooled together from friends and founders of the group. They developed a PC motherboard that unfortunately was not so successful. “I felt really bad because that was my idea, but all the customers wanted to buy were the chips that I designed,” Dado reveals.”I learned a lot from there.”

With the same idea from his first startup, with adjustments made, and with someone investing a million dollars in his idea, Dado put up his second startup company with a former boss of his, Chips and Technology. He basically designed the very first chip set for the PC. “It enabled a lot of engineers who wanted to design the PC system to come up with their own design because we took care of the nitty-gritty for compatibility,” he shares. The company grew very, very fast and from the time they started it, they took it public in 22 months, and in four years, the revenue was $650 million.

S3 was (as the name implies) his third start up company. “I was very disappointed with the graphics performance of the PC, it was very slow,” he recalls. After setting up a meeting with Microsoft and a separate meeting with Intel to pitch his idea, he started his redesign of the chip he needed to make the computer run faster. The technical term is “bus,” borrowing from the concept of an actual bus, because it is a collection of signals and data being shipped from one place to another. “Today that bus is called PCI, and it is everywhere. Companies use it now as a standard bus.”

In 1997, he was given the Master Entrepreneur of the Year Award sponsored by Ernst and Young, Inc. magazine and Merrill Lynch Business Financial Services.

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"What I like us to see us begin to create products that can compete globally. Because that is the only way to develop our economy. If we only do it for our own size economy, we are still a developing economy, we will forever be a developing economy."

- Dado Banatao

From: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gBbwqQeEyU







« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 05:30:00 PM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: Technology Entrepreneur: Diosdado Bantato
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2017, 05:43:56 PM »
What it takes to be a successful engineer > entrepreneur > venture capitalist:

". . . for those of you guys who think that being successful is about discovering or thinking something in the shower or whatever . . . no . . . it is a series of training, developing confidence that you can do it . . . will lead you eventually to doing a lot of those things that seemingly are so difficult and impossible to do. It can be done even in a sector of the industry that is so tough which is technology."

https://youtu.be/7YmmrhOL2Bg

« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 05:55:43 PM by adroth »

adroth

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Re: Technology Entrepreneur: Diosdado Bantato
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2017, 06:03:55 PM »
PhilDev

http://www.phildev.org/what-we-do/

====

https://youtu.be/-JJmA48ahBk

APEC SME SUMMIT 2015: Dado Banatao on why innovation will change lives

adroth

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Re: Technology Entrepreneur: Diosdado Bantato
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2019, 07:33:39 AM »
Let a thousand tech startups bloom
DOST, private firms come together to support the local startup community
By: Annelle Tayao-Juego - Reporter / @neltayao
Philippine Daily Inquirer / 05:02 AM September 01, 2019

To help businesses work hand-in-hand with science is one of the many goals of the Philippine Council for Industry, Energy, and Emerging Technology Research (PCIEERD), a grant-giving unit of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), as it works toward its target of supporting the creation, completion, and commercialization of 1,000 local tech startups in the next five years.

“Gone are the days when [scientific] researchers just create a paper about their innovations and publish it in a scientific journal,” says Enrico Paringit, PCIEERD executive director. “Now, we are driving toward creating output that have societal good.”

This means, Paringit adds, that researchers need all the help they can get when it comes to finding a place for their technological innovations in the commercial market—and that’s where PCIEERD’s expertise comes in.

For the past nine years, the council has been partnering with different universities for their Technology Business Incubation program.

The incubators—like coworking spaces—are set up inside these partner universities because such institutions are usually breeding grounds for fresh ideas.

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Mentorship is provided by incubators’ partners, such as investors in their respective regions, corporations, local business chambers and organizations, as well as other universities.

“Researchers don’t really have that entrepreneurial mindset, so that’s where we come in [and help link them to the right people]. If they want to take that entrepreneurial route, we help them; otherwise, we just help them with licensing,” Paringit says.

These university-based incubators cater to startups that are still in the ideation stage, says Pili.

PCIEERD has two incubators that are geared toward helping the more advanced startups: QBO and the Asian Institute of Management (AIM)—Dado Banatao incubator.

So far, PCIEERD has been able to support over 200 startups, 74 of which have “graduated” from the program.

One of their success stories is the development of a transponder for boats by Futuristic Aviation and Maritime Enterprise (Fame), Inc., headed by CEO Arcelio Fetizanan Jr.

The project started in Palawan State University, and was further improved by the AIM-Dado Banatao incubator.

“The initial application was for fishing boats. [Fetizanan] asked for funds to develop low-cost transponders. While there were transponders already available in the market, he saw that these were too expensive, and local fishermen in Palawan couldn’t afford them,” says Pili.

Around 150 boats in Palawan and General Santos City are now equipped with Fame transponders that indicate the boats’ location.

The company is also attracting more clients in Southeast Asia after completing an accelerator program in Singapore, says Pili.

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Read more: https://business.inquirer.net/278034/let-a-thousand-tech-startups-bloom#ixzz5yykNC55H
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adroth

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Re: Technology Entrepreneur: Diosdado Bantato
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2019, 12:28:21 PM »
DTI: PH can become artificial intelligence powerhouse
By /INQ.net |April 10,2019 - 11:40 AM

Instead of fearing artificial intelligence (AI), a supposed threat to the country’s thriving business process outsourcing (BPO) industry, the Philippines can position itself as a global AI hub, Trade Secretary Ramon Lopez said.

In a recent chance interview, Lopez said the Department of Trade and Industry would soon launch an initiative to train the country’s IT and engineering graduates to create AI solutions for the global marketplace.

Lopez said the government could team up with successful Filipino technopreneur Dado Banatao to upgrade the skills of the country’s IT, science and engineering graduates.

The Philippines produces about 100,000 science and engineering graduates every year “but they will have to be trained in fast computing which is the expertise of Dado (Banatao),” Lopez said.

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Banatao is the founder of PhilDev Foundation, a nonprofit organization that advocates to eradicate poverty through the benefits of science and technology.

Lopez said Banatao’s local office, Wave Computing, which is developing the AI Center of Excellence in the Philippines, could also be the government’s partner in unlocking the country’s potential.

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Read more: https://cebudailynews.inquirer.net/227513/dti-ph-can-become-artificial-intelligence-powerhouse#ixzz5z5p8YH8A
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