Author Topic: Burke-class USS John McCain collides with Philippine-fl-- err, Liberian-flagged  (Read 8701 times)

horge

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Burke-class USS John McCain collides with Philippine-fl-- err, Liberian-flagged freighter

The destroyer USS John S. McCain collided with a merchant vessel on Monday morning as "search and rescue efforts" ensued,
the U.S. Navy says. The collision happened near the Strait of Malacca while the U.S. warship was headed to Singapore for a
routine port visit. The U.S. ship appeared to have damage to part of its side.

“There are currently 10 sailors missing and five injured,” the navy said in a statement posted on the website of the commander
of the US Pacific fleet. The USS John S. McCain is currently sailing under its own power and heading to port.

The merchant vessel, the Alnic MC, is a Chemical/Oil Products Tanker currently under the flag of Liberia.


http://www.c7f.navy.mil/Media/News/Display/Article/1283879/uss-john-s-mccain-collides-with-merchant-ship-near-strait-of-malacca-update-100/
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=11908132
http://www.wcvb.com/article/us-military-vessel-collides-with-merchant-ship/12039353
http://www.kcra.com/article/us-military-vessel-collides-with-merchant-ship/12039353
https://www.vesselfinder.com/vessels/ALNIC-MC-IMO-9396725-MMSI-636017930

link to Burke-class collision back in June: http://defenseph.net/drp/index.php?topic=1914.0
« Last Edit: August 21, 2017, 10:21:11 AM by horge »

horge

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some photos published by the Chicago Tribune


USS John S. McCain, portside waterline damage
Roslan Rahman / AFP/Getty Images


USS John S. McCain, portside waterline damage
Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Fulton / AP

Ayoshi

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IHS Jane's 360


USS John McCain, seen here after the collision on 21 August 2017. Source: Royal Malaysian Navy

adroth

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Remains of all 10 missing US sailors from destroyer found: US Navy
 August 28, 2017, 1:56 pm

http://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1007722

SINGAPORE -- All 10 missing sailors from the USS John S. McCain were confirmed dead as their remains had been found aboard the ship now docked at the Singapore Changi Naval Base, the US Navy said Monday.

The destroyer collided with oil tanker Alnic MC in waters off the eastern side of Singapore last Monday.

Of the 10, six were electronics technicians, two interior communications electricians and two information systems technicians, aged between 20 to 39.

Two  bodies were identified last week, according to the US Navy.

The search and rescue operation at sea for the unaccounted was suspended last Thursday after the US Navy decided to focus on recovery of the warship itself.

According to the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore, the Singapore-coordinated search and rescue efforts with the United States, Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia covered 5,524 square km and involved more than 300 personnel from various Singapore agencies.

The collision was the second involving a destroyer from the US 7th Fleet in two months.

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horge

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Off to Yokosuka for repairs



The guided-missile destroyer USS John S McCain (DDG-56) is loaded on heavy lift transport MV Treasure,
off the coast of Singapore, Oct. 7. Treasure will transport McCain to Fleet Activities Yokosuka for repairs.
https://news.usni.org/2017/10/08/video-timelapse-uss-john-s-mccain-loaded-heavy-lift-transport#more-28661

dr demented

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The McCain had to be diverted to the Philippines due to a 4 inch crack which developed in the hull while in transit from Singapore to Yokosuka.

https://news.usni.org/2017/10/21/destroyer-mccain-developed-crack-in-hull-while-on-heavy-lift-transport-vessel-being-rerouted-to-philippines-for-inspection

Quote
Destroyer USS John S. McCain Developed Hull Crack in Transit on Heavy Lift Vessel; Ship Routed to Philippines for Inspection

By: Megan Eckstein
October 21, 2017 10:54 AM

Destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG-56) developed a 4-inch crack in its hull while being transported via heavy lift vessel and will be rerouted to the Philippines for inspection, a U.S. 7th Fleet spokesman told USNI News.

Following an Aug. 21 collision with merchant vessel Alnic MC, McCain was being transported from Singapore, where the collision occurred, to Yokosuka, Japan, where repairs will take place. During the transit on heavy lift transport vessel MV Treasure, the crack – “about four inches long on the starboard side, amidships” with an accompanying small dent – was noticed, Cmdr. Clay Doss told USNI News.

The new damage, combined with inclement weather and heavy seas associated with Typhoon Lan, forced Treasure to reroute to the Philippines.

“Once pier side, experts will inspect the crack and determine if any additional repairs are needed before continuing to Yokosuka,” Doss said.
“MV Treasure had already slowed because of the storm, and pulling in allows inspection of the small crack while the weather improves.”

The Navy determined McCain could be repaired in Yokosuka, Japan, due to the nature of the damage – berthing and mechanical spaces were flooded and damaged, but many of the major electrical systems were unharmed, unlike the USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62) collision that destroyed the ship’s radar and combat system. Transporting the ship to Japan instead of the United States for repairs would be the quicker and less costly decision, with the Navy determining the repairs could be completed in Yokosuka for about $223 million.

Dutch

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Flooded in less than a minute: How USS McCain sailors escaped the worst-hit berthings | Channel News Asia - 02 November 2017

Quote
WASHINGTON: Only two of the sailors who had been in the worst-damaged room on the USS John McCain managed to escape, it emerged in the US Navy's report on the destroyer's collision with a tanker in the Straits of Singapore.

The ten other sailors who had been in Berthing 5 at the time of the accident were killed.

The berthing is 15 feet (4 metres) wide, but the impact compressed the space to only 5 feet wide, the report said.

< Edited >

The impact created a 8.5-metre-wide hole on the side of the McCain, where Berthings 3 and 5 were located.

All sailors with significant injuries were in Berthing 3 at the time, and all the sailors who were killed were in Berthing 5.

BERTHING 5: FLOODED IN LESS THAN A MINUTE
Based on the size of the hole, and the fact that Berthing 5 was below the waterline, it was likely that the space flooded fully in less than a minute after the collision, the report said.

The first sailor to escape from Berthing 5 was already on the ladder leading out of the room to the deck above, when the collision took place. The impact knocked him to the ground, but he managed to climb out.

The second - and last - sailor who escaped heard the crashing and pushing of metal before the sound of water rushing in. Within seconds, water was at chest level.

< Edited >

The sailor found that the blindfolded egress training, a standard that requires training to prepare sailors for an emergency, was essential to his ability to escape, the report noted.

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BERTHING 3: SAILORS PINNED IN THEIR RACKS
Berthing 3, which is immediately above Berthing 5, also suffered substantial damage, including a large hole in the bulkhead. Racks - as the bunks are known - and lockers detached from the walls and were thrown about, leaving jagged metal throughout the space, the report said.

A sailor from Berthing 3 was thrown to the ground "as the wall next to him blew apart in the collision", and had to be pulled to safety by other sailors. He was among those who were medically evacuated later.

< Edited >


View within Berthing 3 post-collision. (Photo: US Navy)


Ayoshi

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Navy finds deep-rooted failures led to fatal collisions | Defense news
Quote
A comprehensive review of the Surface Navy conducted by the Navy’s Fleet Forces Command found that both the Japan-based 7th Fleet headquarters leadership and its ship commanders allowed training and proficiency to erode as they sought to keep ships underway to meet operational requirements.

“The risks that were taken in the Western Pacific accumulated over time and did so insidiously,” according to the report released Thursday. “The dynamic environment normalized to the point where individuals and groups of individuals could no longer recognize that the processes in place to identify, communicate and assess readiness were no longer working at the ship and headquarters level.”

< snipped >

The review raised troubling questions about the ability of surface warfare officers in today’s fleet and their ability to act under pressure.

In a detailed analysis of the four major accidents in 7th Fleet this year — two deadly collisions, a grounding and a minor collision with a fishing boat — the review found that officers and enlisted sailors performed poorly when faced with a dangerous situation.

The review ascertained that in all four incidents this year, when the crews were faced with an extreme situation, they delayed actions, froze and did not alert their crews of imminent danger.


Tugboats from Singapore assist the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain as it steers towards Changi Naval Base, Republic of Singapore following a collision with the merchant vessel Alnic MC while underway east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore on Aug. 21. (Joshua Fulton/Navy)

adroth

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Former CO of USS John S. McCain Pleads Guilty to Negligence in Collision Case
By: Sam LaGrone
May 25, 2018 5:05 PM

https://news.usni.org/2018/05/25/former-co-uss-john-s-mccain-pleads-guilty-negligence-collision-case

WASHINGTON NAVY YARD – The commander of the guided-missile destroyer that collided with a merchant ship off Singapore in August 2017 pleaded guilty to a single charge of negligence for his role in the incident that killed 10 sailors.

As part of an agreement to plead guilty, former USS John S. McCain (DDG-56) commander Cmdr. Alfredo J. Sanchez admitted to not setting the proper watch team for the busy shipping lane the ship was entering, or taking proper action when the bridge crew lost control of the ship due to a poor understanding of the helm controls.

A military judge sentenced Sanchez to a punitive letter of reprimand and forfeiture of $6,000 in pay. As part of the agreement, he has requested to retire, and that request will be allowed or denied later in the accountability proceedings. The results of the court-martial also put a federal misdemeanor on his record. Sanchez had faced admiral’s mast shortly after the collision and was given credit for his punishment at sentencing.

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In the court-martial, Sanchez admitted he acted against the recommendation of his operations officer, navigator and executive officer. They advised Sanchez to set McCain’s sea and anchor detail as the ship was entering the heavily traveled Singapore traffic separation at 5 a.m. local time on Aug. 21. A ship’s sea and anchor detail include a U.S. warship’s most experienced ship handlers that are put on the watch bill when the ship enters difficult operating areas. Instead, Sanchez ordered the more experienced watch team to get an extra hour of sleep and said he would supervise the less experienced crew on the bridge.

During the transit, a change in settings on the ship’s new digital integrated bridge and navigation system caused the 18-year-old helmsman to lose control of McCain when the steering function was transferred to another terminal on the bridge.

“We put this on this 18-year-old,” Sanchez said.
“I did not put him in a position to succeed.”

While the watch spent three minutes attempting to gain control of the ship, it had drifted into the path of the oiler Alnic MC. McCain did put on a signal to indicate to other ships it was out of control, but it did not attempt to reach other ships via bridge-to-bridge radio or sound warning blasts of the ship’s horn, nor did it sound the collision alarm inside the destroyer.

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« Last Edit: September 02, 2018, 02:03:58 PM by adroth »

adroth

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Surface Forces Are Refocused
By Vice Admiral Thomas S. Rowden, U.S. Navy
Posted January 03, 2018

http://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/Pages/Surface-Forces-Are-Refocused.aspx#.W4uBrOhKjD4

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Fitzgerald and John S. McCain

While there is a good deal of focus being placed on the degree to which mission qualifications had been waived in the Japan-based Forward Deployed Naval Force (FDNF), both the Fitzgerald and John S. McCain had demonstrated the minimum requirements for getting under way and conducting routine operations.

In each collision, known and understood direction—whether from the commanding officer or technical authorities—was ignored or disregarded by watchstanders. In each case, there were notable deviations from standard operating procedures. Do such deviations occur as the result of systemic failures in the production of surface ship readiness at a force level? If so, how? What is the transmission path of the error that begins as a mismatch of supply and demand resources at the fleet level and ends up with a qualified officer of the deck not making required reports to the commanding officer?

This question is difficult, if not impossible, to answer, because the “dots” do not necessarily connect. Regardless of whether a systemic failure is demonstrated across the fleet, we must be critical of all the policies, procedures, and schools we use to man, train, and equip the fleet. This is a complex process and requires synchronization across the community and Navy to ensure both unit-level proficiency and force-level support are improved to achieve the readiness and warfighting proficiency our nation demands and our sailors deserve.

Comprehensive Review

On 2 November 2017, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Admiral John Richardson released the findings of a panel led by Admiral Philip Davidson, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, that reviewed the state of readiness of the surface force and how that readiness interacted with the specific circumstances involved in the incidents of 2017. In his findings, Admiral Davidson identified gaps in doctrine, organization, training, material, leadership and education, personnel, and facilities. For example:

n doctrine, the review found weaknesses in the way operational tasking is prioritized and issued to Japan-based ships; in organization, variances were identified in headquarter staffs and the manner by which they execute command and control and manage the readiness of assigned forces; in training, gaps were noted in the way seamanship and navigation skills are provided and assessed for individuals and teams on surface ships; for material, inconsistencies and gaps were found in the configuration control and oversight of bridge navigation systems; in leadership and education, deficiencies were noted in the leader’s ability to identify, mitigate, and accept risks, and then learn rapidly from near-miss events and other hazards; in personnel, gaps were identified in the qualification and proficiency of the surface force in seamanship and navigation; and in facilities, gaps were identified in the shiphandling trainers and associated shore-based infrastructure in place to support training for seamanship and safe navigation at sea. 3

The panel’s report categorizes these gaps in five key areas or tenets:

(1) Fundamentals. Basic skills such as seamanship and navigation, rigor in individual qualification processes, proficiency, and adherence to existing standards.

(2) Teamwork. The extent to which the surface force deliberately builds and sustains teams, and whether they are tested with realistic and challenging scenarios.

(3) Operational Safety. The process and tools by which ships are made ready for tasking, ships are employed, and technology is used to safely operate at sea.

(4) Assessment. The extent to which ships and headquarters plan, critically self-assess, generate actionable lessons learned, and share knowledge across the force.

(5) Culture. The sum of the values, goals, attitudes, customs, and beliefs of the surface force that defines its identity. 4

The report speaks to these five tenets, noting that its key findings and recommendations “are intended to instill the needed capabilities and proficiencies to make the surface force safer and more effective.” 5 The conclusions contained in the report are an important start to revitalizing the professionalism of the surface force and reestablishing warfighting excellence on a base of sound and fundamental competence.

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adroth

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USS John S. McCain Collision, A Year Later
By: Ben Werner
August 21, 2018 4:03 PM

https://news.usni.org/2018/08/21/35947

< Edited >

When McCain collided with a civilian tanker, the merchant ship’s bulbous bow struck the port side of McCain, causing extensive flooding below the waterline, and crumpling berthing and some mechanical areas. The damage was severe, but the flooding did not damage many of McCain’s electronic components. The Navy determined McCain could moved from Singapore, where it pulled into port following the collision, and repaired in Japan.

However, a crack developed in McCain’s hull while being transported to Japan on a heavy lift transport. Due to the 4-inch crack amidship on McCain’s starboard side and bad weather from a Typhoon, McCain’s transit to Japan took a detour to the Philippines.

In December, McCain arrived in Japan to begin an estimated year-long, $223-million repair job to make the ship seaworthy again. This project will be one of the largest to occur at U.S. Naval Ship Repair Facility-Japan Regional Maintenance Center, according to the Navy.

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Ayoshi

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https://navaltoday.com/2019/07/18/post-repair-tests-reveal-new-issues-on-uss-john-s-mccain/

Quote
Post-repair tests reveal new issues on USS John S. McCain
Posted on July 18, 2019

Rectification works are underway and are expected to be completed in October 2019, NAVSEA spokeswoman Colleen O’Rourke confirmed to Defense News. A redelivery is set to take place in the summer of 2020.

USS John S. McCain is undergoing the repairs at the Navy’s Ship Repair Facility and Japan Regional Maintenance Center (SRF-JRMC) Yokosuka with support from personnel from Bath Iron Works (BIW), who originally built the ship.

adroth

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USS John McCain Back to Operations Almost 3 Years After Fatal Collision
By: Gidget Fuentes
June 16, 2020 3:20 AM

https://news.usni.org/2020/06/16/uss-john-mccain-back-to-operations-almost-3-years-after-fatal-collision

The guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG-56) is resuming operations in 7th Fleet three years after a devastating collision killed 10 sailors.

Last week, the ship and the crew completed the six-month basic phase training, a key milestone before returning to the fleet.

“We’re back, and we’re more ready and we’re more lethal than ever before,” Cmdr. Ryan Easterday, McCain’s commander, said during a conference call with journalists on Tuesday morning, Japan time.

The crew aboard the Yokosuka, Japan-based McCain started the basic phase in November following a two-year maintenance period that included upgrades to some warfighting systems. This spring, the ship got underway for certifications and a final battle problem.

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