Author Topic: Will HMS Ocean Find a Buyer in Asia?  (Read 741 times)

dr demented

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 317
    • View Profile
Will HMS Ocean Find a Buyer in Asia?
« on: April 15, 2017, 12:26:54 PM »
The odds on favorite is Brazil to get the ship.  But if that deal doesn't go through.........

As the article suggests, imagine if Malaysia or Indonesia get HMS Ocean instead.

http://thediplomat.com/2017/04/will-hms-ocean-find-a-buyer-in-asia/

Quote
Will HMS Ocean Find a Buyer in Asia?

Could HMS Ocean find its next steward in the Asia-Pacific?

By Robert Farley
April 14, 2017

It looks as if HMS Ocean is for sale.

Constructed between 1993 and 1998, HMS Ocean has served as the Royal Navy’s primary amphibious assault ship since commissioning. She displaces 21,000 tons, makes 18 knots, and can carry up to 18 helicopters. She also has facilities for carrying and deploying boats, marines, and ground vehicles. In short, HMS Ocean is a fairly standard big, flat-decked amphibious warship, with a decent amount of wear and tear but also with some years left in her service window. The Royal Navy expects to need her less in anticipation of the completion of its two new large carriers, HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales.

The asking price for HMS Ocean appears quite low; reportedly around $75 million, payable in installments. Of course, costs associated with maintenance and the acquisition of helicopters would be more significant, but should be manageable for any navy that already has some experience with maritime helicopters.

Rumor now has it that Brazil is the most likely buyer. Earlier this year, Brazil finally gave up on the NAe Sao Paulo, an older aircraft carrier purchased in 2000 from France. This leaves Brazil without a (semi) operational carrier for the first time since 1960. But deals can fall apart and re-materialize quickly; recall that no one expected Egypt to acquire the two ex-French, almost-Russian Mistral-class amphibs until it suddenly did. If Brazil doesn’t buy, a few nations in the Asia-Pacific might be interested.

The Royal Malaysian Navy has undertaken significant modernization efforts over the past decade, including the acquisition of modern submarines, frigates, and patrol aircraft. The leap to a 21,000 ton helicopter carrier would be quite a jump, but Malaysia’s strategic situation encourages such thinking; a wide maritime space, with many islands and extremely busy shipping routes is an ideal environment for a mid-range amphibious warship.

The Indonesian Navy faces strategic and operational problems similar to those of Malaysia, only more so; it needs to patrol a huge maritime space while also maintaining HA/DR capabilities. A big amphib is perfect for these kinds of responsibilities, and HMS Ocean could help Indonesia develop the expertise necessary to operating a next generation warship.

Chile operates a small but modern fleet, and historically has displayed periodic interest in large ships. Given long-term tensions between Chile and Argentina, London might find the idea of transferring the carrier to Santiago particularly appealing.

Mexico represents a conundrum for naval analysts; a large, wealthy country with a substantial coastline, and very real maritime monitoring issues, but with virtually no high-end navy to speak of. Although Mexico is not as dependent on maritime trade as many other countries (given the amount of exports that passes by truck or rail to the United States), shipping still accounts for a significant percentage of Mexican exports. And Mexico is certainly wealthy enough to experiment with a “starter” carrier such as HMS Ocean. However, even if Mexico acquired Ocean, it is likely that the navy would use the ship in the Caribbean, rather than the Pacific.

Other potential targets include Pakistan and Taiwan, although sale to either would generate significant political problems with India and China, respectively. Australia, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, and Japan already have ships in the same general class as Ocean, so likely are not plausible landing spots. In any case, the transfer of HMS Ocean to a new navy would represent the continuation of a trend that has been developing since the 1990s: the spread of amphibious warships around the world’s fleets.

mamiyapis

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 112
    • View Profile
Re: Will HMS Ocean Find a Buyer in Asia?
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2017, 09:27:46 PM »
It depends how creative the PN could get in justifying the ship, but USD 75 million for an LHD is cheap, especially given her previous owners and the ship's capabilities.

She was refitted as recently as 2014 and is only being retired as cost-saving measure for the cash-strapped British. It would mess up any Chinese Navy planner's day if the PN were able to acquire such a ship.

El_Filibusterismo1978

  • Timawan
  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 45
    • View Profile
Re: Will HMS Ocean Find a Buyer in Asia?
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2017, 10:06:38 PM »
is the price includes the CIWS and the sensors?, Mr. M?

LionFlyer

  • Timawan
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 159
    • View Profile
Re: Will HMS Ocean Find a Buyer in Asia?
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2017, 10:38:52 PM »
If PN has money to spend (80 to 100 million pounds), there are other priorities such as replacing the WWII PCEs. The operating cost, aviation assets and manpower needed to run HMS Ocean are considerable that it leaves only a few navies in running.

Other than Brazil, I will guess Canada as the other non Asian candidate.

Ayoshi

  • Timawan
  • Boffin
  • *
  • Posts: 2145
    • View Profile
Re: Will HMS Ocean Find a Buyer ?
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2017, 09:34:46 PM »
Brazilian government authorises purchase of UK’s HMS Ocean | Janes - 05 December 2017
Quote
The Brazilian Navy requested this authorisation in early 2017 after a decision to retire its NAe São Paulo aircraft carrier, and after the Royal Navy said the LPH could be available for sale once decommissioned in March 2018.

Ocean would be inspected by Brazilian Navy officers before that, while authorisation from the US government is also being requested as the ship has some US-built components.


The UK Royal Navy&#8217;s HMS <I>Ocean</I> helicopter carrier may next be heading to Brazilian service. (Crown Copyright/UK Ministry of Defence)


dr demented

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 317
    • View Profile
Re: Will HMS Ocean Find a Buyer in Asia?
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2018, 11:33:44 AM »
Sale price to Brazil is 84 million pounds.

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/brazil-purchase-hms-ocean-84-million/?utm_source=TW&utm_medium=Twitter&utm_campaign=social

Quote
Brazil announce purchase of HMS Ocean for £84 million
By
George Allison -
January 2, 2018

We were informed by a source in the Brazilian defence community that the vessel has been sold for £84 million.

Roberto Lopes has informed us that the purchase of HMS Ocean by the Brazilian Navy was confirmed within the last week by Brazilian Defence Minister Raul Jungmann.

We understand the first group of four Brazilian officers will head to the UK within the next few weeks.

We also understand that there are doubts over the retention of the Phalanx CIWS by Brazil but are unsure regarding the reasons why. The vessel will remain in the UK until October or November this year.

We broke the news in March that Brazil was interested in helicopter carrier HMS Ocean, this has now been confirmed by the Brazilian government.

Then in April, we reported that the Brazilian Navy had reportedly sent a proposal to pay for helicopter carrier HMS Ocean in instalments.

HMS Ocean is the UK’s only helicopter carrier and the fleet flagship of the Royal Navy. She is designed to support amphibious landing operations and to support the staff of Commander UK Amphibious Force and Commander UK Landing Force.

According to Brazilian journalist Roberto Lopes in an e-mail to us, the ship’s cost to the Brazilian Navy is fixed at £84.3 million pounds (312 million Brazilian Reais). Commander of the Brazilian Navy, Admiral Eduardo Leal Ferreira, claimed that the price of Ocean seemed “convenient”.

Then this week, IHS Janes reported that Brazil’s MoD authorised efforts to purchase Ocean once she leaves UK service.

We understand from Roberto Lopes via e-mail, the source who let us know that Brazil has already submitted a payment plan for the vessel, that the officers involved in the ship acquisition process are optimistic and are already discussing details beyond the technical and financial assessments that have been made, such as the name of the ship.

“Minas Gerais is the strongest designation at the time. Rio de Janeiro was ‘saved’ for the future aircraft carrier. However, nothing definite. Only with the execution of the acquisition is that defined.”

According to someone we spoke to earlier in the year currently on-board the vessel, there were rumours that this is one of a number of possibilities:

“People have been talking about what will happen to the ship after 2018, there were rumours that the vessel might be sold to another navy but there’s been no mention of what navy that might be.”

The helicopter carrier was constructed in the mid-1990s and commissioned in September 1998. In November 2015, the MoD confirmed that HMS Ocean is to be decommissioned in 2018 with no like-for-like replacement.

This comes as the Brazilian Navy have decided to abandon the refit of the  aircraft carrier Sao Paulo and decommission the vessel after a series of technical issues and accidents. Rectification costs are understood to be a major factor in this decision.

The Sao Paulo is a Clemenceau class aircraft carrier commissioned in 1963 by the French Navy as Foch and was transferred in 2000 to Brazil, where she became the new flagship of the Brazilian Navy. The earlier intention of the navy was that the vessel would continue in active service until 2039, at which time the vessel would be nearly 80 years old. IHS Janes reported that during its career with the Brazilian Navy, São Paulo has suffered from ‘serviceability issues and has never managed to operate for more than three months at a time without the need for repairs and maintenance’. It is no surprise therefore that the navy have now announced, as reported by DefesaNet, that the ship will be ‘demobilised and subsequently decommissioned’.