Author Topic: Drug war death toll  (Read 987 times)

adroth

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Drug war death toll
« on: January 31, 2017, 01:01:31 AM »
http://news.abs-cbn.com/news/01/30/17/pdea-to-lead-war-on-drugs-after-bato-disbands-aidg

More than 7,000 people have been killed in the Duterte administration's bloody crackdown on illegal drugs, with 2,250 dead in police operations and the rest classified as "under investigation".

adroth

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Re: Drug war death toll
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2017, 10:59:23 AM »
From: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-philippines-duterte-police-specialrep-idUSKBN17K1F4

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Almost 9,000 people, many small-time users and dealers, have been killed since Duterte took office on June 30. Police say about a third of the victims were shot by officers in self-defence during legitimate anti-drug operations. Human rights monitors believe many of the remaining two thirds were killed by paid assassins operating with police backing or by police disguised as vigilantes - a charge the police deny.

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adroth

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Re: Drug war death toll
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2017, 12:01:40 AM »
Update: 74,650 ‘live’ suspects nabbed so far in ongoing anti-drug campaign
By Christopher Lloyd T. Caliwan 
May 19, 2017

http://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/989280

MANILA, May 19 -- More than 74,000 drug suspects have been arrested so far by various law enforcement agencies (LEA) as part of the government’s continuing effort to wipe out illegal drugs and criminality.

In an update, law enforcement agencies conducted 58,751 anti-drug operations from July 1, 2016 to May 17, 2017 which resulted to the arrest of 74,650 suspects.

Lead agencies involved in the anti-illegal drugs operations are the Philippine National Police (PNP), Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA), National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) and the Bureau of Customs (BoC).

Their consolidated report as of May 17 showed that 2,999 drug suspects died in police operations, while 41 died and 122 were wounded on the side of law enforcement agencies.

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adroth

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Re: Drug war death toll
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2018, 02:54:41 AM »
SolGen won’t give drug war records to SC
By: Marlon Ramos - Reporter / @MRamosINQ Philippine Daily Inquirer / 07:30 AM January 13, 2018

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Solicitor General Jose Calida has reneged on his word to furnish the Supreme Court copies of official police reports and other pertinent documents on the death of some 4,000 suspects in the government’s anti-illegal drug campaign.

Invoking national security, the state lawyer asked the high court to annul its Dec. 5, 2017, order which compelled the Philippine National Police to submit within 60 days its investigation reports on the implementation of President Duterte’s brutal war on drugs.

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Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/959829/solgen-wont-give-drug-war-records-to-sc#ixzz543atQ03z
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

adroth

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Re: Drug war death toll
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2018, 03:18:47 PM »
From; http://www.manilatimes.net/duterte-claims-un-useless-india-speech/376716/

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Cayetano tells Human Rights Watch to apologize

On Friday, Foreign Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano demanded an apology from the international watchdog Human Rights Watch (HRW) for claiming that the Philippines was at its worst human rights crisis since time of strongman Ferdinand Marcos.

Cayetano at the same time called on the HRW to stop politicizing the Philippine government’s war against illegal drugs.

“It (HRW) owes the Philippines and the rest of the international community not just an explanation but also an apology for making unfair accusations by skewing the real numbers just so it could advance its own agenda,” Cayetano said in a statement.

Cayetano was reacting to the international watchdog’s 2018 World Report wherein it stated that President Rodrigo Duterte “has plunged the Philippines into its worst human rights crisis since the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos in the 1970s and 1980s.”

The report also claimed that Duterte’s war on drugs had resulted in an “epidemic of police shootings—often portrayed as ‘shootouts’ but repeatedly shown to be summary executions—[and]had left more than 12,000 people killed.”

Cayetano said the HRW needed to explain how it came up with figures about the number of victims in the campaign against illegal drugs.

“12,000 victims in the campaign against illegal drugs could not be possible since this number failed to take into consideration the number of homicides and murders that have also been taking place all across the country,” Cayetano said.

Cayetano also claimed that had the international watchdog taken a closer look at the situation in the Philippines, it would have seen that Filipinos now felt safer as a result of the government’s efforts to address the illegal drugs problem.

Citing data from the Philippine National Police, Cayetano said there was an 8.44-percent year-on-year decline in the crime volume from January to October 2017 and a 20.56-decrease in index crime during the same period.

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