Author Topic: China’s Shipbuilding Industry  (Read 2952 times)

Ayoshi

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China’s Shipbuilding Industry
« on: January 16, 2017, 10:25:33 PM »
China urges shipbuilders to secure foreign acquisitions | IHS Jane's 360 - 16 January 2017
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A statement by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) on 13 January said foreign acquisitions were one part of a "plan of action to accelerate the transformation and upgrading" of China's naval/commercial shipbuilders by the end of the decade.

The national shipbuilding plan was written by a number of Chinese government agencies including the MIIT's State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense (SASTIND), the Ministry of Finance, and the China Banking Regulatory Commission.

see also: Book -- Chinese Naval Shipbuilding: An Ambitious and Uncertain Course

Ayoshi

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China Shipbuilding signs co-development deal with PLA naval university | IHS Janes 360 - 10 March 2017
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The state-owned China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC) and the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Naval University of Engineering have signed an agreement to collaborate on military technologies, CSIC has announced.

< snipped >

The PLA Naval University of Engineering has been credited with developing a number of systems for PLAN applications.

In recent years the university has developed naval target recognition systems, access control systems and an electromagnetic catapult system for future aircraft carriers.

Ayoshi

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Re: China’s Shipbuilding Industry
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2017, 07:11:58 PM »
China to sell off major stakes in naval shipyards | IHS Jane's 360 - 21 August 2017
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The China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC) is to sell major stakes in two of its biggest naval shipyards, state-run news in China reported on 19 August.

Citing announcements to the Shanghai Stock Exchange, the reports said CSIC will divest stakes in the Dalian Shipbuilding Industry Company (DSIC) and the Wuchang Shipbuilding Industry Group (WSIG) to eight Chinese investors.

According to the reports, the divestments will be worth CNY22 billion (USD3.3 billion), and will proceed through debt-to-equity swaps. This marks the first instance of such a financing method being utilised in the defence industry, the reports said.

Ayoshi

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Re: China’s Shipbuilding Industry
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2018, 01:11:05 AM »
China quietly increasing warship numbers | Janes - 21 September 2018
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Until recently, the launch of ships for the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) has been accompanied by images posted on social media sites by Chinese navy enthusiasts, and the commissioning of ships reported by state-owned news media.

However, in 2018 a number of warships appear to have been launched with very few photographs emerging online, and ship commissionings have taken place without media coverage. This suggests that the Chinese authorities want to curtail awareness of the shipbuilding programme and are suppressing the circulation of images or creating an environment in which self-censorship is producing the same result.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2018, 01:32:33 AM by Ayoshi »

Ayoshi

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Re: China’s Shipbuilding Industry
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2018, 12:18:26 AM »
China’s CSIC secures ‘international credit line’ worth USD7.3 billion | Janes - 06 December 2018
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The agreement is expected to support a range of industrial activity and is the latest in a series of similar deals announced in recent years.

Citing a statement by CSIC, China’s State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence (SASTIND) – the government’s leading defence industrial agency – said that the new “international credit line” was formally agreed by CSIC and the Bank of Shanghai on 4 December.

Ayoshi

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Re: China’s Shipbuilding Industry
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2019, 02:03:39 AM »
China shipbuilder to deliver first homegrown cruise ship in 2023 | asia.nikkei.com - November 10, 2018 01:31 JST
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The ship, along with a second due the following year, will be designed and built by CSSC, U.S. cruise giant Carnival and Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri under a recently signed deal. A joint venture launching this week between CSSC and Carnival will operate the ship, with the possibility of building an additional four vessels.

The $770 million, 135,000-ton vessels will have a passenger capacity of 5,246 across 2,125 cabins. That dwarfs one of Japan's largest cruise ships, the Asuka II, with a gross tonnage of around 50,000 and a capacity of 872 passengers.

China's leisure travel demand is growing as its middle class expands. In 2017, around 4.95 million Chinese went on a cruise, up 8% on the year, according to an industry group survey. The count is expected to break 5 million for 2018, and further growth is expected in the future.


A Royal Caribbean cruise ship at port in China's Liaoning Province. The number of Chinese people taking cruises rose 8% in 2017. © Reuters

Ayoshi

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Re: China’s Shipbuilding Industry
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2019, 12:48:32 AM »
https://www.janes.com/article/90416/chinese-shipbuilding-merger-geared-toward-technology-development

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Chinese shipbuilding merger geared toward technology development
13 August 2019

In comments to the state-owned China Securities Journal on 11 August, Hu also stated that the merger will not create a monopoly given the growing capabilities of China’s private-sector shipbuilders. After years of planning, the merger was finally confirmed by the two state-run corporations in July.

A schedule for the merger has not yet been confirmed by the Chinese government, although Hu indicated it could start soon.