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Messages - adroth

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1
Thread Indices / Re: Philippine Military Aviation
« on: Today at 01:39:36 PM »
TBA

2
Thread Indices / Re: Philippine Military Aviation
« on: Today at 01:39:22 PM »
TBA

3
Thread Indices / Philippine Military Aviation
« on: Today at 01:38:51 PM »
Aircraft of the AFP

Operational

Aircraft  Service  Description  Threads
             
Combat, Fixed-wing           
             
KAI T-50 / FA-50

  Acquired to satisfy the Surface Attack Aircraft / Lead-In Fighter Trainer
(SAA/LIFT) requirement.
  Surface Attack Aicraft / Lead-In Fighter Trainer Acquisition Project
What is the FA-50 really for?
A primer on FA-50 systems
Are the PAF's FA-50PHs overpriced?
A2A refueling options for the FA-50
multi-platform OBOGS issues and the FA-50PH
No additional FA-50PHs orders for now -- DND
KAI T-50 Family news & upgrades
Golden Eagle @ USAF T-X
Indonesian KAI T-50i Trainer Jets
Details of Botswana FA-50 bid emerge
             
Combat, Rotary-wing           
             
Utility, Rotary-wing           
             
Training, Fixed-wing           
             
Training, Rotary-wing           
             

Historical




======



C/o the Francis Neri albums



4
MiG-29 start-up to shut down
Polish Air Force
Kleine Brogel Air Base

https://youtu.be/iXRSyj_mNis






5
Airports and Civil Aviation / Re: New Bohol International Airport
« on: June 23, 2018, 11:30:20 PM »
Japan plans to provide 42.48-B yen loan to PH
By Leslie Gatpolintan  June 22, 2018, 6:55 pm

http://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1039166

MANILA -- Japan plans to provide official development assistance (ODA) loans of up to 42.48 billion yen (about PHP20.6 billion) for two infrastructure projects, including upgrading the Metro Rail Transit (MRT) 3 railway in Manila, as it strongly supports the sustainable economic development of the Philippines.

Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono expressed his country’s intention to extend ODA loan financing, subject to the necessary Japanese and Philippine governments’ approval processes for the projects, during the Japan-Philippines Foreign Ministers’ Meeting held Wednesday in Tokyo.

Kono bared planned total loan provision of up to 38.101 billion Japanese yen for the MRT Line 3 Rehabilitation Project, and provision of up to 4.376 billion yen for the New Bohol Airport Construction and Sustainable Environment Protection Project, to Philippine Foreign Affairs Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano.

< Edited >

Likewise, Japan offered additional funds for construction of a new airport in Bohol province in a bid to handle the increasing passenger numbers.

“It is expected that due to the construction of the new Bohol airport, the province will be able to handle nearly three times as many aircraft arrivals and departures as before, improving the convenience and safety of air transportation, and contributing to the revitalization and sustainable growth of the region,” added the MOFA of Japan.

During the fifth meeting of the Japan-Philippines Joint Committee on Infrastructure Development and Economic Cooperation also held Wednesday in Tokyo, participants from two countries discussed approaches to cooperating in order to resolve the major challenges the Philippines is addressing.

< Edited >


6
Filipino Potential / Japan plans to provide 42.48-B yen loan to PH
« on: June 23, 2018, 11:25:36 PM »
Japan plans to provide 42.48-B yen loan to PH
By Leslie Gatpolintan  June 22, 2018, 6:55 pm

http://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1039166

MANILA -- Japan plans to provide official development assistance (ODA) loans of up to 42.48 billion yen (about PHP20.6 billion) for two infrastructure projects, including upgrading the Metro Rail Transit (MRT) 3 railway in Manila, as it strongly supports the sustainable economic development of the Philippines.

Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono expressed his country’s intention to extend ODA loan financing, subject to the necessary Japanese and Philippine governments’ approval processes for the projects, during the Japan-Philippines Foreign Ministers’ Meeting held Wednesday in Tokyo.

Kono bared planned total loan provision of up to 38.101 billion Japanese yen for the MRT Line 3 Rehabilitation Project, and provision of up to 4.376 billion yen for the New Bohol Airport Construction and Sustainable Environment Protection Project, to Philippine Foreign Affairs Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano.

“Based on this pledge, the Government of Japan and the Government of the Philippines are scheduled to sign exchange of notes concerning the yen loans in the future,” the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA) of Japan said in a statement.

In response to a request from the Philippine government, Japan will provide the funds necessary to rehabilitate the MRT Line-3, the 17-kilometer train running the stretch of EDSA with a total of 13 stations.

Japan will utilize its technology to upgrade the line to quality infrastructure, thereby improving the safety and comfort of the railway.

“It is expected that due to the rehabilitation of the MRT 3 Line, approximately twice as many trains as currently will run appropriately by 2022 (two years after the completion of the project), greatly improving their transport volume, alleviating the serious traffic congestion in Metro Manila, and contributing to the alleviation of air pollution and climate change,” it said.

Likewise, Japan offered additional funds for construction of a new airport in Bohol province in a bid to handle the increasing passenger numbers.

“It is expected that due to the construction of the new Bohol airport, the province will be able to handle nearly three times as many aircraft arrivals and departures as before, improving the convenience and safety of air transportation, and contributing to the revitalization and sustainable growth of the region,” added the MOFA of Japan.

During the fifth meeting of the Japan-Philippines Joint Committee on Infrastructure Development and Economic Cooperation also held Wednesday in Tokyo, participants from two countries discussed approaches to cooperating in order to resolve the major challenges the Philippines is addressing.

These include also the rehabilitation of the MRT-3 Line, the Metro Manila subway project, and other infrastructure development projects, as well as assistance to development in Mindanao based on progress of the peace process.

Infrastructure development in Metro Manila and the regions is among the major fields of cooperation identified under Japan-Philippines joint statement on bilateral cooperation for the next five years.

In the joint statement issued during the visit of President Rodrigo Duterte to Japan last October, the Japanese government would strongly support the sustainable economic development of the Philippines by extending quality infrastructure assistance, utilizing its funding and technology to the maximum extent, for developments under “Build, Build, Build” infrastructure program.

Other fields of cooperation between the two countries include energy, creation of employment and improvement of living standards, Mindanao, public safety, information and communications, environment, agriculture, and disaster risk reduction. (PNA)

7
Politics and Government / A nationalist agenda
« on: June 23, 2018, 11:03:23 PM »
From: https://thediplomat.com/2016/10/is-duterte-nation-building-in-the-philippines/

< Edited >

Building a nation?

Duterte speaks the truth about U.S. colonialism, but not the whole truth. He speaks truly about U.S. colonialism and “the Philippines,” but he is not openly truthful about “the Philippines,” ignoring or glossing over important class, geographic and ethno-linguistic cleavages that lie beneath its politics of patrimonial elitism.

One reason for the latter is, as we have seen, that he and his family are from that class itself. But this cannot be all there is to it, for his predecessors (even his immediate predecessor President Benigno Aquino III, who himself attempted, as Duterte is now, to negotiate a peace agreement with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front) steered very clear of any overt criticism of the United States’ historical and continuing role in shaping Philippine politics. It is not only the elite: nowhere in the world does the United States enjoy as high popular support as in the Philippines.

Why has he broken with this convention?

The fundamental reason would seem to be the conviction that the Philippine state cannot purge itself of systematic traditions of patrimonial corruption unless it does so from the foundations of a perceived and universally shared Philippine national identity. And such a shared identity, in a land of many identities, demands a single, us-versus-them, narrative foundation of the kind his simplified history of U.S. colonialism implies.

In this context his drawing of outraged Philippine attention to the U.S. massacre of the Moro people at the battle of Bud Dajo is a key move. First, in acknowledging grievances (though only by generalizing them as not only Moro, but Filipino), and second, through this generalizing, in reframing the official national mythology. For the Moro people, it is a rare public recognition of historical grievances by a Philippine president. For the leftist movement, it is an acknowledgement of their historical narrative: that the plight of the Filipino poor is due to the domination of a neo-colonial comprador bourgeoisie beholden to and kept in power by American interests.

“Nation-building” is so common a trope in public parlance in the Philippines that it is almost meaningless. It has also proved elusive, not the least because of the difficulty of weaving a common narrative in such a diverse political community riven with so many fault lines of language, culture, ethnicity, geography, and class. But it is, we suggest, entirely plausible that this is what Duterte’s actions amount to, even if it is impossible to be sure with what clarity, if any, he understands that this is what they do.

Consider too that Philippine political scientists often talk about mayors as a special breed of politician: down-to-earth, aware of limitations, and pragmatic. With over two successful decades in municipal politics, these are the traits Duterte’s behavior manifests. Drugs are a problem in the Philippines. What is the most direct way of dealing with it? Kill drug pushers and users. Is it feasible? Yes. Let us do it. China is encroaching on Philippine maritime territory. Is it possible to repel China? No. Let us deal with China, then. The insurgencies are a fundamental challenge to the state and a major loss of treasure and life. Can they be defeated? No. Let us negotiate peace with them. All these are part of what add up to an effective nation-building project, perhaps not planned, but playing out so. The insurgencies are the capstone of this. President Aquino had tried to stir up nationalism against China and not without success, but it was not an issue the Moro people or the rural poor were interested in getting behind. He succeeded in signing a peace agreement with the MILF but that was sabotaged in the legislature, by among others, Senators Alan Peter Cayetano and Bongbong Marcos, Duterte’s running mate and ally.

His obsession with drugs and more broadly (petty) criminality might be based on personal conviction but it struck a chord. He was able to thematize it and create a platform that apparently all socioeconomic classes can share. By changing the national narrative as he appears to be doing, he might be able to bring those two other key segments, which have never really fit in: the Muslims of Mindanao and the revolutionary left.

However, much that great scholar of Southeast Asian nationalism, Benedict Anderson, would have disapproved of his penchant for brutal methods, it may be that Duterte sees himself (if only through a glass dimly) as, in his strongman way, constructing “an imagined political community,” a Philippine nationalism “imagined as both inherently limited and sovereign.”

Certainly this would explain his difference-denying account of Philippine political history, and his determination to set that story against the colonial sovereign authority of the United States, just as it fits with his us (good filipinos) versus them (drug dealers) narrative, and his assertion of Philippine autonomy in foreign affairs.

Whether this is a good way to build a nation is another question.

8
Quote
"In the case of (diesel-electric) submarines, we can get just one or two, if needed, and for the multi-role fighters, we don't need to get the whole squadron (12 aircraft). We can just get six, we can comply with the budget," Andolong said in Filipino.

You could probably buy everything on the list... but you end up buying 1, 2 or 3 of each. Makes for good press (e.g "we fulfilled our roles") but it is just poor planning to shoehorn the projects based on budget without any operational considerations. For some of these projects, there is a minimum number for sustainment and operations reasons.

Funds for the AFP modernization program are drawn from the AFP Modernization Trust Fund (AFPMTF). The national budget is only one of the sources of the funds for the AFPMTF, and the President is actually empowered to source funds from other alternative sources. It'll be interesting to see how he swings this.

9
China Topics / Yuanwang 3 - Space event support ship (AGM)
« on: June 23, 2018, 04:06:10 PM »
From Combat Fleets of the World, 15th Edition

Yuanwang means "Look Long". First two, initially observed during 5-80 Chinese ICBM tests in the central Pacific, were refitted in 1986-87 and again in 1991-92. Have been subordinated to China's satellite launch and tracking control department and are officially known as "Space Event Ships".

=====


Questions raised on Chinese ship's stay in Davao City
August 14, 2010 - 12:00am

DAVAO CITY, Philipines  – Local officials have raised questions on the stay at the Sasa Wharf here for 10 days of M/V Yuanwang III, a Chinese national scientific tracking and survey ship.

Officials of various agencies here are equally unaware of details on the arrival of what locals have tagged as the “Chinese spy ship.”

< Edited >

The Coast Guard official said there could deception on the part of those behind the ship since they failed to submit the ship’s description to the offices concerned.

< Edited >

Army Lt. Col. Randolph Cabangbang, spokesman of the Armed Forces’ Eastern Mindanao Command, said the ship was given clearance to dock until Aug. 15 reportedly for it to replenish its supplies.


Read more at https://www.philstar.com/nation/2010/08/14/602127/questions-raised-chinese-ships-stay-davao-city#jZR7BTKgLvQGFxkc.99

10
China Topics / Re: Spotted PLAN - Spy Ship in Davao "Yuan Wang 6"
« on: June 23, 2018, 03:18:24 PM »
Yuan Wang class vessel have been visiting Davao for years

Questions raised on Chinese ship's stay in Davao City
August 14, 2010 - 12:00am

DAVAO CITY, Philipines  – Local officials have raised questions on the stay at the Sasa Wharf here for 10 days of M/V Yuanwang III, a Chinese national scientific tracking and survey ship.

Officials of various agencies here are equally unaware of details on the arrival of what locals have tagged as the “Chinese spy ship.”

< Edited >

The Coast Guard official said there could deception on the part of those behind the ship since they failed to submit the ship’s description to the offices concerned.

< Edited >

Army Lt. Col. Randolph Cabangbang, spokesman of the Armed Forces’ Eastern Mindanao Command, said the ship was given clearance to dock until Aug. 15 reportedly for it to replenish its supplies.


Read more at https://www.philstar.com/nation/2010/08/14/602127/questions-raised-chinese-ships-stay-davao-city#jZR7BTKgLvQGFxkc.99

11
Dick Gordon commends AFP plan to purchase submarines
Published June 22, 2018, 4:07 PM
By Mario Casayuran

https://news.mb.com.ph/2018/06/22/dick-gordon-commends-afp-plan-to-purchase-submarines/

Senator Richard J. Gordon doffed his hat off to the Department of National Defense (DND) for its plan to buy submarines as part of its military upgrade amid growing security challenges in the Southeast Asian region.

Gordon said the earlier than expected acquisition is a ‘’step in the right direction.’’

< Edited >

A few years ago, the Commission on Appointments (CA) confirmed the appointment of a Philippine Navy officer who was subsequently sent to train on submarine warfare in Germany.

The DND has announced that the purchase of submarines had been moved from the military’s shopping list under Horizon 3 to Horizon 2. Projects under Horizon 2 will be implemented from 2018 to 2022, while Horizon 3 projects will run from 2023 to 2028.

< Edited >

12
Philippines moves ahead with ‘second horizon’ modernisation
Jon Grevatt, Bangkok - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly
21 June 2018
 
http://www.janes.com/article/81234/philippines-moves-ahead-with-second-horizon-modernisation?utm_campaign=CL_%20Jane%27s%20360-June-22-2018_PC5308_e-production_E-11307_KP_0622_0715&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

< Edited >

Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte has given approval to the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) to progress plans to procure a wide range of defence equipment under its ‘second horizon’ modernisation programme, which runs 2018–2022.

The state-run Philippines News Agency (PNA) reported on 20 June that the second horizon programme has been allocated “roughly PHP300 billion” (USD5.6 billion) and includes the procurement of a range of tactical military platforms including multirole combat aircraft and diesel–electric submarines.

Department of National Defense (DND) spokesman Arsenio Andolong was quoted by the PNA as saying Duterte has approved the funding programme, which also encompasses an accelerated schedule for the submarine procurement. This was originally scheduled for the 2023–2027 third horizon but has now been moved forward, said Andolong. “This is not included in horizon three any more,” he said. “It has been pushed into horizon two [and the procurement] must be studied.”

< Edited >

PN officials have said the service requires at least two submarines and that the procurement was initiated in 2015 through the issue of a preliminary request for information (RFI). The PN has also established a submarine office that, as part of planning processes, is reviewing contemporary submarine designs and drawing up a concept of operations. Philippine Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana also confirmed in 2017 that the Russian-made Kilo-class submarine was one platform under consideration.

13
General Discussion / Re: The Rule of Three
« on: June 22, 2018, 08:45:22 PM »
The Chinese carrier-deployment gap highlights the importance of the rule-of-three

Carrier rendezvous at Dalian Shipyard
Some wonder if mooring the two carriers in Dalian has crated a 'defense void' in disputed areas of the South China Sea
By FRANK CHEN MAY 30, 2018 6:45 PM (UTC+8)

http://www.atimes.com/article/chinas-two-carriers-both-dock-in-dalian/

Liaoning, the People’s Liberation Army’s solo aircraft carrier in service, has joined her sister ship, the nation’s first domestically built carrier which has yet to be christened, at the Dalian Shipyard since Sunday.

Chinese papers and military buffs are hailing the historic rendezvous of the two seagoing airbases, relishing the picture-perfect occasion of two huge vessels moored alongside each other.

Liaoning is back at her homeport of Dalian in the northeastern Chinese province it is named after for scheduled maintenance as well as R&R for her crew, having spent the majority of the first half of the year at sea. It also led an armada of ships and submarines in April which included a high-profile passage through the Taiwan Strait.

The last time Liaoning was in dry-dock was in May 2014, in the same berth where the Soviet-era vessel was retrofitted. The new homemade carrier is almost a lookalike of the Liaoning with an identical ski-jump bow. It is also moored at the Dalian Shipyard after undergoing its first sea trial earlier this month.

Recent photos indicate the new carrier is undergoing checks below her waterline, with some activity suggesting newer layers of anti-corrosion coating being put on the hull.

< Edited >

Some have also questioned if there’s now a “defense void” on China’s offshore fronts, in particular in the South China Sea, given the fact that the US sent in the Higgins, a guided-missile destroyer, and the Antietam, a guided-missile cruiser, last week right after Liaoning sailed out of those waters.

A big navy needs at least three carriers to work in shifts: one berthed for checks, one at sea for training purposes while the third stays combat-ready.

< Edited >


======




14
Carrier rendezvous at Dalian Shipyard
Some wonder if mooring the two carriers in Dalian has crated a 'defense void' in disputed areas of the South China Sea
By FRANK CHEN MAY 30, 2018 6:45 PM (UTC+8)

http://www.atimes.com/article/chinas-two-carriers-both-dock-in-dalian/

Liaoning, the People’s Liberation Army’s solo aircraft carrier in service, has joined her sister ship, the nation’s first domestically built carrier which has yet to be christened, at the Dalian Shipyard since Sunday.

Chinese papers and military buffs are hailing the historic rendezvous of the two seagoing airbases, relishing the picture-perfect occasion of two huge vessels moored alongside each other.

Liaoning is back at her homeport of Dalian in the northeastern Chinese province it is named after for scheduled maintenance as well as R&R for her crew, having spent the majority of the first half of the year at sea. It also led an armada of ships and submarines in April which included a high-profile passage through the Taiwan Strait.

The last time Liaoning was in dry-dock was in May 2014, in the same berth where the Soviet-era vessel was retrofitted. The new homemade carrier is almost a lookalike of the Liaoning with an identical ski-jump bow. It is also moored at the Dalian Shipyard after undergoing its first sea trial earlier this month.

Recent photos indicate the new carrier is undergoing checks below her waterline, with some activity suggesting newer layers of anti-corrosion coating being put on the hull.

< Edited >

Some have also questioned if there’s now a “defense void” on China’s offshore fronts, in particular in the South China Sea, given the fact that the US sent in the Higgins, a guided-missile destroyer, and the Antietam, a guided-missile cruiser, last week right after Liaoning sailed out of those waters.

A big navy needs at least three carriers to work in shifts: one berthed for checks, one at sea for training purposes while the third stays combat-ready.

< Edited >


======



15
Philippines moves ahead with ‘second horizon’ modernisation
Jon Grevatt, Bangkok - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly
21 June 2018
 
http://www.janes.com/article/81234/philippines-moves-ahead-with-second-horizon-modernisation?utm_campaign=CL_%20Jane%27s%20360-June-22-2018_PC5308_e-production_E-11307_KP_0622_0715&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

< Edited >

Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte has given approval to the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) to progress plans to procure a wide range of defence equipment under its ‘second horizon’ modernisation programme, which runs 2018–2022.

The state-run Philippines News Agency (PNA) reported on 20 June that the second horizon programme has been allocated “roughly PHP300 billion” (USD5.6 billion) and includes the procurement of a range of tactical military platforms including multirole combat aircraft and diesel–electric submarines.

Department of National Defense (DND) spokesman Arsenio Andolong was quoted by the PNA as saying Duterte has approved the funding programme, which also encompasses an accelerated schedule for the submarine procurement. This was originally scheduled for the 2023–2027 third horizon but has now been moved forward, said Andolong. “This is not included in horizon three any more,” he said. “It has been pushed into horizon two [and the procurement] must be studied.”

< Edited >

PN officials have said the service requires at least two submarines and that the procurement was initiated in 2015 through the issue of a preliminary request for information (RFI). The PN has also established a submarine office that, as part of planning processes, is reviewing contemporary submarine designs and drawing up a concept of operations. Philippine Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana also confirmed in 2017 that the Russian-made Kilo-class submarine was one platform under consideration.

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